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Old September 6, 2000, 12:44 PM   #1
jeepster
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Join Date: January 10, 2000
Location: MA,
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Hello Guys,

I have a birthday coming up and have convinced the family to buy me a reloader. I will only be reloading pistol ammo. Mainly 9mm, .40s$w, .44 mag and .45. I am mechanically inclined so i want for than a single stage press. I would like something that will last me a while and will let me reload multiple calibers.
Like I said, I'm a newbie to reloading so I know squat. What manuals or books should I read on this.
Finally what press do you all recommend. It should cost around 300 dollars.
Thanks for any info you can offer.
Jeepster
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Old September 6, 2000, 01:57 PM   #2
Hutch
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Jeep, I always recommend a starter to get a copy of "The ABC's of Reloading" by Dean Grennell. It's a great book, full of useful information. It's been thru several revisions, so I don't know which one is the most current. It is NOT a load manual (I call them recipe books). You'll still need some of those. Start w/ the Lyman, Hornady, Speer, or Sierra guides. There'll all good. I'm not sure if you fat-fingered your post, so it's not clear if you DO or DON'T want a progressive press. I'd recommend you start with a single stage press. It'll always be useful. Even if you later buy a progressive press, there'll always be chores you can use a single stage press for. Call Midway at 800-243-3220 for a catalog. They stock everything you need except the best progressive loader, the Dillon. They're great folks to do bidness with.

All the best.
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Old September 6, 2000, 07:54 PM   #3
WESHOOT2
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Get yourself an RCBS, Redding, or Lyman single-stage.

Dillon for speed(and if you're real serious save more money and buy the XL650).

Buy quality, the stuff will last a lifetime.

------------------
"All my ammo is factory ammo"

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Old September 7, 2000, 01:37 AM   #4
Pete in CO
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by jeepster:
Hello Guys,

I have a birthday coming up and have convinced the family to buy me a reloader. I will only be reloading pistol ammo. Mainly 9mm, .40s$w, .44 mag and .45. I am mechanically inclined so i want for than a single stage press. I would like something that will last me a while and will let me reload multiple calibers.
Like I said, I'm a newbie to reloading so I know squat. What manuals or books should I read on this.
Finally what press do you all recommend. It should cost around 300 dollars.
Thanks for any info you can offer.
Jeepster
[/quote]

I agree with the others. Get the best that you possibly afford, and with extensive reading and research about reloading. The even have VCR tapes to show you the fundamentals of reloading. I leaned many years ago at a friends house that was a reloader. It is another way to learn, remember when in doubt, STOP READ ASK QUESTIONS. Be safe and enjoy years of satisfaction knowing the loads you put together are custom by you.
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Old September 7, 2000, 08:17 AM   #5
Jack Straw
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I would give some consideration to the Dillon AT500. It is basically the RL550 stripped down to be a turret press. That will give you the same learning experience as if you had a single stage press, plus you can upgrade it later to a full progressive press. In the mean time, you can use the cost difference to get dies, components, etc...

When I started, I only planned on loading for pistols but I liked it so much I started loading for my rifles too. That would be another advantage of the AT500/RL550; with the Square Deal B you can't load for rifles.

Not to be repetetive, but by all means go ahead and get a manual and read it so that you will be familiar with the process before you get your equipment. If you know someone that reloads, get them to show you and talk to you in addition to reading a manual.

Happy Early B-day!

Jack
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Old September 7, 2000, 09:01 AM   #6
muddyboots
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I hate to say but, $300 won't go as far as you might hope. If you opt for a single stage press it will be better.

Progressive press- nice, fast, higher price on caliber changes.

You will want to buy only carbide dies for those pistol calibers. Four sets of dies,shell plate holders, press, powder scale, dial calipers, a good reloading manual or two. That's the minimum you need.
Then all those supplies Two types of primers (sm. and lg. pistol), Four different bullet tips (9,40,44,45...that's if you only pick one weight per caliber), you can get by with one powder type if you watch it and are not to picky.

The single stage kits are a good deal RCBS Rock Chucker comes with everything except calipers, buy your primers, powder,tips and you ready to go.

I have progressive and single stage press, sometimes it's nice to have a single stage when trying new loads.

And remember "Reloading Does Not Save Money, you just shoot more".


[This message has been edited by muddyboots (edited September 07, 2000).]
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Old September 7, 2000, 06:26 PM   #7
lowepg
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Only pistol calibers?

Consider the Square Deal from Dillon.

Dont waste your money on a single stage.
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Old September 7, 2000, 08:15 PM   #8
johnwill
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I can't second the recommendation of the Dillon SD. While it's a nice press for what it's intended for, it uses non-standard dies. I'd put an extra $100 with the money and get the Dillon 550B, it uses standard dies and will last your lifetime. I suspect that you might want to load rifle calibers at some time in the future, and then you'd be stuck with a pistol-only setup.
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Old September 7, 2000, 08:28 PM   #9
rr41mag
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I bought a used set from an individual (all RCBS) a few years later I got another deal of almost identical equipment so now I have 2 of everything. (all RCBS) it was cheap but still good equipment. with the rockchucker press you can get the piggyback for it and go progressive. some times at gun shows you can pick up used dies for about a third the price. I got a set of lee .41 mag dies for $12.00.
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Old September 7, 2000, 11:09 PM   #10
Steve Smith
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High, Newbie! I'm kind-of a newbie at the reloading stuff too. I've been doing it for about 4 months not (about 1500 rounds). Being mechanically and technically inclined, I bought a progressive. I started with a Lee Slow 1000, and sold it quickly...it was very troublesome. I then bought a Dillon 550B and the rest is history. That thing is an ammo making machine for sure! I'd reccomend it in a heartbeat. If you don't want to spend much, though, get a single stage for a while.
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Old September 8, 2000, 12:49 AM   #11
jtduncan
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Hutch is on the money. Get a Dillon 550 B.

------------------
The Seattle SharpShooter - TFL/GT/UGW/PCT/KTOG
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Old September 8, 2000, 08:53 AM   #12
M1911
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The Dillon 550B isn't cheap. But it's a great machine. I hadn't done any reloading for a couple months, but needed to do a few hundred rounds in a hurry. Checked the first couple rounds through for weight of powder charge, overall length, and check in the case guage. No problem, everything was perfect. An hour later I had 300 new rounds packed away and the machine cover back on. I love my Dillon. The only thing I don't like about my 550 is that it isn't a 650 or 1050...

Jared
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Old September 8, 2000, 03:13 PM   #13
sundog
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Jeep, since you're wanting to load multiple calibers, consider a Lee turret press with deluxe powder dump. Get extra heads and dies, scale (absolute must), calipers, MANUALS (several), primers, powder, and other odds and ends, maybe even a tumbler. With one or two powders, some primers and bullets, you can start loading all of them right away. I have two of these for several years and use them all the time. They make good ammo. I also have other presses, but these guys (Lee turrets) can turn out good pistol ammo purdy fast and change calibers fast, especially if your dies are set up on their own turret heads. Three hunert dolla U.S. will go a long way if you don't necessarily have to have blue or green paint (granted the quality is a cut above), but you can still make alot of good ammo! Go the high dollar expensive stuff and you won't have enough money to turn out your first round. Or, try some local pawn shops and garage sales for stuff. I've picked up alot of really good used (some like new) equipment for almost nothing (Lyman Orange Cursher press-15, RCBS 505 scale-10 (like new), etc). Jest asettin' hare thankin'.... sundog

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Old September 8, 2000, 11:08 PM   #14
BIGR
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RCBS Rock Chucker or Lyman presses.
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Old September 11, 2000, 04:17 PM   #15
bad4u
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I got a Dillon Square Deal B as a gift from my son. I set it up for reloading .45acp. The only failure I've experienced with the SDB was due to a primer falling into the linkage below the shell-holder and jamming the linkage.

I'm thinking about getting a 9mm pistol now, and I think I'll try the Lee Turret Press Kit with auto-index and their disc powder measure. Several people (on this forum) use it and love it - and the price is definitely right.

If you have a friend who reloads, I'd ask him to guide you through the setup and use of whatever press you buy. In that case, it might be wise to buy whatever press that friend uses.
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Old September 12, 2000, 12:29 AM   #16
kjm
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Go with the Dillon RL550B. It was my first, last, and only machine. I don't think you can deal with better people than dillon. If anything breaks, they fix it, if from some act of stupidity you break something, they fix it free. They really do mean no BS in their no BS warranty. The only failing of the machine is that you almost have to get the video to put it together. I tried and tried (I don't have a TV thank-God), so I had to buy the video, and go to my brother's house, machine and all to put it together right. Once it is together, it cranks out ammo almost as fast as you can shoot it. I really can't suggest dillon enough. I load .357, .38 and .40 so far. I'm planning to get into .223 & 30-06 soon. If not Dillon at least get the most machine you can with your money.
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