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Old June 22, 2000, 11:25 AM   #1
tonyz
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Question:

What are your views of primmer and powder residue buildup inside the case, Could this increase pressure as more residue builds up??

Tony Z

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Old June 22, 2000, 12:00 PM   #2
char923
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Clean your brass befor you reload it and you should not have residue buildup.
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Old June 22, 2000, 12:35 PM   #3
Mike Irwin
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Not to any appreciable extent.


Powder residue will reach a certain level, and not build up any more. Smokeless isn't like black powder in that regard.



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Old June 22, 2000, 07:05 PM   #4
Art Eatman
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I've never heard, read nor seen any evidence of inside-the-case residue creating any problem. Not since 1950, anyhow...

FWIW, Art
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Old June 22, 2000, 09:15 PM   #5
tonyz
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I do clean The inside of each case 9MM and 38 SPL. I use a 44 Mag, felt bore cleaner and put it on a eletric drill, spray on a little gun scrubber and clean theinside of them all and they turn out as shiny as new.
But many people I know don't clean the inside and I was just wondering about residue buildup.

Tony Z
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Old June 22, 2000, 09:49 PM   #6
char923
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All you realy need to do is run your brass through a tumbler and then use one of your wife good towel to wipe the brass off and then reload. The inside of the brass does not have to be that clean.
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Old June 23, 2000, 05:27 AM   #7
Bud Helms
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Never had a problem with residue build up with the modern powders, just like Mike Irwin and Art said.

Char923 is right though, if you do wipe them down, use one of your wife's best dish towels. Quality tools, you know. From experience, it's best to not let it ever show up again. You know, evidence and all that. Don't put it in the dirty clothes basket, you'll get caught. Just get another one and let her work on the mystery of the disappearing towels for a few weeks. Then, when you get a chance, get to SAM's and get a pkg of new for yourself.

PS: Occasionally, I will clean primer pockets.


[This message has been edited by sensop (edited June 23, 2000).]
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Old June 23, 2000, 09:00 AM   #8
tonyz
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I do tumble and will still clean the inside as before.Guess I am clean nut. And I always use my wifes clean towels they are the Easyest to find . But when I have read posts about nickel plated brass raising pressure, I just thought that some residue build up would cause higher pressure. Not that it would cause a pressure problem.

I just wanted some feedback Thanks guys.

Tony Z



[This message has been edited by tonyz (edited June 24, 2000).]
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Old June 23, 2000, 11:25 PM   #9
OkieGentleman
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Just a thought on rags. I buy washed t-shirt material rags for about a $1.10 a pound in 10# or 25# boxes. 10# last a long time. Try your local wipe cloth seller.
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Old June 24, 2000, 10:55 AM   #10
Southla1
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by sensop:


Char923 is right though, if you do wipe them down, use one of your wife's best dish towels. Quality tools, you know. From experience, it's best to not let it ever show up again. You know, evidence and all that. Don't put it in the dirty clothes basket, you'll get caught. Just get another one and let her work on the mystery of the disappearing towels for a few weeks. Then, when you get a chance, get to SAM's and get a pkg of new for yourself.
[/quote]

I remember the time I was experimenting with black powder. I was wrapping each charge in a silk cloth, where all I had to do was drop it in the cylinder of my 36 Navy. (saves measuring it). Well you guessed what I got ahold out of the dresser! . she never missed em (I think). BTW the experiment failed.


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Old June 24, 2000, 12:41 PM   #11
Art Eatman
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Carlyle, if she started lookin' at ya sorta funny--she missed 'em! Otherwise...

Maybe that's why paper was used in the old days for pre-measured black powder charges. It might have been more combustible?

, Art
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Old June 24, 2000, 01:23 PM   #12
Mike Irwin
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Carlyle,

Silk bags are normally only used where there is a pretty substantial amount of powder. Silk is pretty flame resistant, and it takes a large, extended burn for it to really go up.

You would have been better off using nitrated onion-skin paper.

Original Colt-manufactured loads, which had the bullet attached to the powder charge (all you had to do was drop and ram), came in several varieties:

1. Nitrated paper with the paper sealed to the bullet with a pitch compound.

2. Animal intestine (not nitrated), also sealed to the bullet with a pitch.

3. Colloidon sealed rounds. The colloidon was flammable, so there was no need to nitrate anything.

Of the three, colloidon was the most durable and was also pretty waterproof.

A six-pack of original Colt animal gut cartridges brings a BIG price among collectors.

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Old June 24, 2000, 03:04 PM   #13
Southla1
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I admit that I was just experimenting. the reason that I was using silk was that I knew that the 96 pound powder bags for 16 inch naval rifles were made of silk. BTW if anyone wants it, I have a photo on my hard drive in JPG format of USS North Carolina firing a 3 round shot from one of the front turret and the 3 projecitles are visible in the picture AWESOME! If anyone wants it just e-mail me and I will be more than happy to send it to you.

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Old June 24, 2000, 06:23 PM   #14
WESHOOT2
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Counts on what you mean by 'residue'.

I've found all kinds of things stuffed inside fired cases; anything that reduces combustion area raises pressure, and too much reduction is bad.

Residue from normal firing is of absolutely no concern.

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Old June 25, 2000, 11:35 AM   #15
johnwill
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I've never cleaned the inside of the cases, other than the usual walnut tumbling pass, and I have never had a problem that I could attribute to "residue buildup" in any caliber. IMO, this is a nonissue unless you're doing something really odd with your reloads.
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