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Old March 8, 2000, 02:27 PM   #26
mudman
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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Mouse Gun:
For a first time reloader, reguardless of pistol or rifle loads, I would agree with protoolman and buy the Rock Chucker kit. After you've learned what it's all about I would get into a progressive, I would definatly recommend it if you are a high volume pistol shooter.


I've been reloading about 11 years and the only progresive I own is a Hornady Apex for shotshells. I'm mainly a rifle shooter and I don't feel loading match/precision ammo on a progresive will bring out it's maximum potential. I guess this is why reloading to me is more labor than love but in my case I feel it's necessary.


Mouse Gun

[This message has been edited by Mouse Gun (edited March 05, 2000).]
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Old March 8, 2000, 02:40 PM   #27
mudman
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(I've been reloading about 11 years and the only progresive I own is a Hornady Apex for shotshells. I'm mainly a rifle shooter and I don't feel loading match/precision ammo on a progresive will bring out it's maximum potential. I guess this is why reloading to me is more labor than love but in my case I feel it's necessary.)

To Mouse Gun and others who believe you can get better ammo out of a single stage. Thei is an old wives tail. Here is a clue: The bullet doesn't know what kind of press you use, the dies touch the round, not the press. Mone of the commercial reloaders use anything but automated machine for match ammo. I weighed each charge from my dillon 650, they were within 1/10 grain. You are more apt to make mistakes and load faulty ammo with a single stage. But if you old timers have a lot of time on your hands and like to waste it, Rock Chuck away.


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Old March 8, 2000, 04:08 PM   #28
TheOtherMikey
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I bought a Rockchucker as my first press and agree it is an excellent single stage press. BUT, I got tired of all the tedium in single stage reloading and bought myself a Dillon 550B 6 months later. When I reload, I reload a bunch (like 1,000 rounds) because I don't like the change-over for large/small primer feed and small/large capacity powder dies.

If you are shooting 100-150 rounds a week, that equates to 2,500 or more rounds every six months. 2,500 would be a nice production run for, say, 9mm or .45 ACP.

I reload just about everything in pistol including 9mm, .45 ACP, .38/357, and .45 Long Colt. For rifles, I reload a bunch of 5.56, and moderate amounts of 30-06 and .308.

Bottom line, if I were starting over, I would just buy the Dillon up front. It is easy to use, works almost flawlessly, and is backed up by a NO BS warrenty and a service staff ready to help you.

Hope this helps, Mikey

------------------
Retired, Broke, and In Need of Brass, Powder, and Shot. Will Work To Shoot!
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Old March 10, 2000, 08:35 PM   #29
Mouse Gun
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Mudman, how does that powder measure do with stick powder? How many benchrest shooters use a Dillon? I do agree at the ripe old age of 32 I'm definatly going to have to do something about speeding things up because I'm just about sick of the single stage blues. I still think someone new needs to learn the basics first. Yes, I knew that wasn't the point of your post.


Brian

[This message has been edited by Mouse Gun (edited March 10, 2000).]
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Old March 11, 2000, 09:15 AM   #30
SW 586
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Snakeman,
When I started reloading, I only wanted to reload for 38/357 and that is still the only cartridge I reload. I had no idea what equipment would best suit my needs. Without doing a lot of research, I bought the RCBS Master Reloader Kit with the Rockchucker press. I have not regretted doing so. The kit comes with everything needed to start loading your favorite cartridge except the dies and shell holder. Since I have more time for reloading than I do for shooting, this press suits my needs perfectly. I enjoy every step of the reloading process, even to the point of seating and crimping the bullet in separate operations. It is good therapy for me and I can pay close attention to every procedure. I use Hornady Custom Grade New Dimension titanium nitride dies (love 'em). In addition, I purchased a dial caliper and I had to order a shell holder plate for the case trimmer to hold 38/357 (strangely this size didn't come with the kit). I plan to add a Little Dandy pistol powder measure because I think it would be better suited for my loading purposes (small powder charges) and an electronic scale.
I will someday move on to a progressive, but for now, I am very happy with my set up. Good luck with your choices and happy shooting!
Bill

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Old March 12, 2000, 02:39 PM   #31
mudman
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Brian, some of those little sticks may be sheared, no matter they flame consistantly, it the Dillon dispenses and sheares uniformly round after round. The consistancy is in the volume of powder dispensed. What your good thoughts are about how careful you loaded have nothing to do with accuracy. Benchresters may be partial to single stage pressed do alot of quirky things to gain accuracy. If you don't guage and sort each case like it was a space shuttle part you gain nothing by struggling with an antique single stage press.
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Old March 14, 2000, 05:34 PM   #32
Mouse Gun
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Mudman, the funny thing is that I do make handloads like I'm building the space shuttle. I guage and watch headspace as I size, uniform primer pockets and deburr flash holes as well, yada, yada, yada. Some of these things you only need to do once but sizing consistantly on a progresive, I'm somewhat unsure of, as well as powder charging. It sounds like it's not much of an issue with the powder. I'm thinking .5 to 1 grain variance of powder in 600yd load or even a long range load could be detrimental. What's your thoughts on this?


Brian

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