The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old December 19, 1999, 11:51 AM   #1
petej88
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 7, 1999
Location: US
Posts: 510
Set up an old cannulure tool and used it on some Rainier 125 grain flat points (Rainier makes moleculer bonded plated bullets).
At first I was having problems with bullets slipping into the case. I decided to increase crimp pressure until the slippage stopped, using a Lee Crimper, in conjunction with my Dillon dies.

I then made a small run of 6 cartridges. I used Starline brass for 5 out of 6. The sixth was Speer (all fired once before).

I brought out my scale and did the thumb pressure test. One cartridge failed at 50 lbs; it was the Speer. The Speer brass also measured an average of 3 grains lighter than the Starline. Conclusion: don't reload with speer brass.

The other 5 cartridges held up well, including one which did not have a cannulure crimp. For each cartridge I did a 50 lb test 3 times, followed by a very painful 70 lb test. If a bullet can take this kind of abuse, you stand an excellent chance of not having a problem of bullet slippage, especially if you just load the round once and fire it.

After the first 50 lb test, bullet slippage was aprox 1/1000". This may or may not be caused from the soft bullet. The next three tests at 50 lbs and one at over 70 lbs, caused the bullet to slip about 4/1000ths" -- still respectful and safe to shoot since it slipped from 1.135 to 1.128-1.130.

Conclusion: cannulure not necessary for soft bullets like the Rainier. A tight crimp literally creates a crimp groove that holds the bullet. Hard FMJ bullets may need a cannulure to get the necessary crimp tension. Yes I know, the 357 Sig is supposed to be taper crimped, but hell, that doesn't work very well.

I tested these tightly crimped rounds at the range. I was pleasantly surprised that they were excetionally accurate. Unfortunately, I didn't have a chronograph.

Is there a better way than a tight crimp or a cannulure bullet? Yes, maybe. I've heard that Cor-Bon and Federal cement the bullet into place. My question, "what kind of cement to they use and how much?" This would be especially good for carry ammo that you have to continually load and unload into your carry pistol. Please find out and post it here. Thanks.

petej88 is offline  
Old December 21, 1999, 02:02 PM   #2
Patrick Graham
Junior member
 
Join Date: January 18, 1999
Location: Kokomo, Indiana USA
Posts: 674
When you say "thumb pressure test" do you mean pushing down in top of the bullet on a set of scales?
How much pressure will the shoulder on the 357 sig brass take?
Patrick Graham is offline  
Old December 21, 1999, 03:02 PM   #3
petej88
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 7, 1999
Location: US
Posts: 510
Thumb pressure test. You put the bullet end on a weighing scale. Then you press down on the primer end with your thumb. The shoulder of the brass can take a lot more force than your poor little thumb.
petej88 is offline  
Old December 22, 1999, 09:56 AM   #4
Patrick Graham
Junior member
 
Join Date: January 18, 1999
Location: Kokomo, Indiana USA
Posts: 674
I'll probably have to start doing the thumb test. I've had a few 45 acp rounds back into the case. I've just stated reloading 357 sig, i'll be using the thumb test there also.
Patrick Graham is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:16 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.06443 seconds with 9 queries