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Old November 26, 2005, 08:14 AM   #1
Low Key
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Cold weather and BP pistols...

Here's a question for you guys, I keep one cylinder loaded, capped up, and ready to go in my 58 Remington and I have been leaving it loaded for 3-4 weeks at a time, (I use my second cylinder for target shooting because I shoot a lighter charge for targets and a heavy charge goes with me in the woods).
I shoot out the always loaded cylinder every 3 or 4 weeks and then clean up and re-load, (no problems with hangfire or anything else that I can tell), but since the weather is now colder outside the pistol gets really cold when I'm out just roaming around the yard and in the woods. Should I be concerned with the pistol sweating and getting my powder charge wet when I bring it back into the warm house?
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Old November 26, 2005, 11:10 AM   #2
Hafoc
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Well, the condensation can't help. If it really worries you, and if you have an enclosed porch, garage, or whatever, you could leave the revolver out in the cold when you bring it home. Won't sweat if it doesn't come into the heated part of the house.

On the other hand, if the caps fit snugly, if the front of the cylinder is sealed with grease, I can't imagine much condensation getting to the powder charge.

I wonder if those old-timers had a way to seal a cap against moisture?
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Old November 26, 2005, 11:13 AM   #3
Hafoc
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Just had a thought. You're removing the cylinder anyway, right? I wonder whether wrapping the cylinder tightyl in authentic 19th Century Saran Wrap would keep any condensation away from it.
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Old November 26, 2005, 11:25 AM   #4
MPP1423
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Well,let Me Tell Ya Something I Do.crazy Or Not It Works And I Have Never Ever Had A Misfire.before Putting On A Cap Take Your Nipple Pick And Run It Thru The Top Side Of Your Nipple Down To The Powder Charge As Far As You Can Run It And Make A Little Pin Hole In The Compressed Charge Then Apply The Cap.this Lets The Fire Get Down Thru The Charge And Not Just On One End.sounds Crazy But It Works Great.never Had A Problem,rain,cold,or Heat!
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Old November 26, 2005, 11:46 AM   #5
Remington kid
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Low Key, Never had a problem with the revolvers and I have carried them in some really cold and damp weather. If I'm out in the rain all day or right after and it's really hummid out then I just shoot out the cylinders and clean up and reload when I get home.
Kevin's idea about the nipple pick is very true and a good idea just to be on the safe side. When I hunt with my longrifles the cold damp days seem to do a job on the barrels and powder. One thing that helps is to seal around the caps with wax or even a little lube. We used to place condoms over the barrels to keep out the moister. It works and you can shoot right through them
They make little finger ones that you could use over the barrel of the revolver if you wanted to. Don't know what there really for and don't want to know
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Old November 26, 2005, 07:21 PM   #6
Steve499
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I think the inside of the chambers are sealed off well enough by the cap and the ball/lube combination to prevent any problems. The condensation on the outside comes from the humidity in the air and I don't think there should be enough humidity inside the loaded chambers to matter. If it's in there it has already been absorbed by the powder anyway. I would think that if it condensed on the inside if the chamber walls, it would have to have been drawn there from out of the powder charge. If theres enough humidity in the charge for condensation to happen, you had wet powder already!

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Old November 26, 2005, 07:52 PM   #7
Old Dragoon
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Condensation happens wihen the tempature is vastly different. having a cold cylinder in saran wrap is just like having a cold cylinder in the house...the condensation forms upon the metal that is colder than the room tempature. saran wrap or not. I do not think that condensation would happen in a closed chamber, outside of the cylinder , yes. Inside the chambers I don't think so.
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Old November 26, 2005, 09:09 PM   #8
MPP1423
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im with yall.i dont think it would cause a big problem loaded up either.
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Old November 26, 2005, 09:42 PM   #9
Steve499
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I loaded my 1858 Remington and hunted with it one day during the regular rifle deer season. I didn't see anything that day and haven't shot it so it's still loaded. The muzzle loader season is open now and I'm going to get out with it the first part of the week. It's been in and out several times, was wiped down for condensation one time, and I haven't the least worry about it going off when the time comes.

With a flintlock, you can't be sure ever, it seems like, that the powder will not get damp, even if it's not raining. The percussion system pretty much solved that. If it's not wet inside the barrel and you load dry powder, you have to just about drop it in the creek to kill the powder.

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Old November 26, 2005, 10:45 PM   #10
Low Key
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What you guys are saying makes sense, cold or heat what moisture is in the cylinder after it is loaded and sealed up doesn't change. I hadn't thought about that until I read your replies. With the cylinder I keep loaded all the time, I put some grease over the ball at one end and melt wax around the caps on the other end so it should all be airtight.
Mike, I don't know what those little bitty condoms are for either but I have used them on my bp rifle barrel to keep rainwater out of the barrel. If they were invented for any other purpose, then I guess whoever invented them had a sick sense of humor.
Thanks for the info guys!
Steve, glad you're back with us. There were some of us starting to wonder where you went.
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