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Old November 8, 1999, 03:30 PM   #1
Alan B
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Besides desiccant and oiling does anyone have any other rust inhibiting ideas?
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Old November 8, 1999, 04:43 PM   #2
slickpuppy
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Bianchi Blue Bags. Don't know if Bianchi makes them anymore but mine still have a year left out of their 3 year life. Brownells also sells anticorrosion bags too. http://www.brownells.com

[This message has been edited by slickpuppy (edited November 08, 1999).]
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Old November 8, 1999, 07:29 PM   #3
HankL
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Alan, Wiping off the arms after handling etc. is a must. Many safes have ventilation holes in the top and some have one in the bottom.
Of course for the one in the bottom to work your safe must rest on some supports that allow air to flow under your safe. A Goldenrod type dehumidifier is an excellent choice if you have a vent in the safe.
If no vent was provided you can drill a 1/2"
hole in it in or near the top and get a Goldenrod type device and not worry about desicant bags and drying them out etc.
Hank
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Old November 8, 1999, 09:41 PM   #4
slickpuppy
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Hank,
I wish that were true in my case, but it isn't. Living in the barrier islands of Florida with the salt air and high humidity requires additional protection for the guns and ammo.
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Old November 12, 1999, 04:34 PM   #5
bobo
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Get the Marine Tuff cloth from Sentry Solutions ( .com )Wipe the arms down once
in a while will work wonders. You can get these from www.brownells.com for $7.00something.

[This message has been edited by bobo (edited November 12, 1999).]
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Old November 12, 1999, 04:48 PM   #6
Fred
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HankL,

This may seem like a silly question, but why do you need a safe with a vent hole to use a Goldenrod dehumidifier? I realize you need at least a small hole for the power cord to go through, but do you need more than that?

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Old November 12, 1999, 05:47 PM   #7
Mike Baugh
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Fred , I had a Golden Rod in my safe and in a weeks time my guns were covered in rust , even the stainless ones , I put a gasket around my door and I beleive this is what caused the problem . I removed the Golden rod and put in a dessicant can and I have not had any more trouble . After thinking about it the lack of ventilation is probably the reason , the heat would build up and cause condensation . If I would have removed the gasket I would probably not have had a problem with the Golden Rod . Good luck , Mike...
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Old November 12, 1999, 07:02 PM   #8
Fred
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Mike B,

Thanks for the reply, but I have to admit that now I'm really confused. Don't misunderstand - I'm not doubting you - but I thought the idea of the Goldenrod was to elevate the safe's interior temperature a few degrees or so to DRY out the air. Why would it cause guns to rust with a gasket seal?

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Old November 12, 1999, 08:01 PM   #9
Mike Baugh
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Fred , dont worry I sometimes doubt myself . As I understand it the Goldenrod heats the air in the cabinet and the moist air is forced out through the holes or gaps in the cabinet . I had my guns stored in my basement for several years without a trace of rust , I bought a safe and a Goldenrod and they rusted within a week . The only thing I can think of that could cause this was the tightly sealed safe . My safe had no air holes except for the cord hole , which was at the bottom and filled with the cord , and I sealed the door tightly with weather stripping , which seemed like a good idea at the time , I think the heat just built up from the GR and made the cabinet condensate . I was surprised at the heat put out by the GR , it got hot enough that you did not want to hold on to it . I have used the safe for 2 years since then with no problem using the dessicant can , I take it out about every 3 months and bake it in the oven to dry it out . Good luck , Mike...

[This message has been edited by Mike Baugh (edited November 12, 1999).]
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Old November 12, 1999, 11:34 PM   #10
Fred
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Thnaks, Mike. Since I am about to move my guns into a well-sealed safe, I'll keep your comments in mind. Appreciate the info.

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Old November 13, 1999, 02:51 AM   #11
Bennett Richards
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For real protection get a Pelican case and put a can of dessicant inside with the weapon.
That's the reason I got a Rem. Marine Magnum!

Ben
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Old November 13, 1999, 02:54 AM   #12
WalterGAII
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I've used a Goldenrod in my Browning fireproof (or resistant) safe for several years, withnot one spec of rust. Seems to me that the instructions that came with the Goldenrod tell you to open the door to the safe every now and then. They warn against drilling holes high on the safe, if fire protection is an issue. Another sure-fire rust preventative is just to buy a bunch of Glocks. They won't rust, no matter what you put them in.
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Old November 13, 1999, 01:03 PM   #13
4V50 Gary
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Don't forget old fashion products like Rig Gun Grease. I've a friend who removed the blue on his 10/22 barrel, rubbed on three coats with successive polishing after each coat. After five years in his gun safe without a Golden Rod, and despite the coastal environment, no rust has appeared.

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Vigilantibus et non dormientibus jura subveniunt

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Old November 13, 1999, 07:05 PM   #14
slickpuppy
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Bennett,
You have the Remington 870 Marine with nickel finish? I was thinking about buying one but can't locate one here in my area. What kind of price range are these?
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Old November 13, 1999, 08:04 PM   #15
oberkommando
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Walt is right, I've had largest Liberty safe with rod in it from day one and havent seen a spec of rust. Safe is warmer than outside air but it must cirrculate somehow, on desktop or in closet I used to get rust. I do open a few times a week though. I'll always use silicone cloths and rust preventative no matter the coating, unless gold plated or titanium nitride ala desert eagle.
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Old November 16, 1999, 08:10 PM   #16
HankL
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All that I can say is that I had a Ft. Knox
Yeager model with fireproofing that came with a hole square in the top as well as the cord hole for the Goldenrod which I ordered. The house never burned down so I can't speak to that and I don't live in a salt air situation either. I do live in the deep South and with high humidy and wild temperature swings I can tell you that in most cases, air circulation will help you out. Case in point, 60 watt bulb in 23' sailboat in slip would keep condensation to near nothing in the open areas.
Perfect solution? Clean items to be stored bringing PH to 7, bring temperature of your holding area to the exact internal temp. of your safe. Hold items to be stored in holding area for at least two weeks. Flood holding room and safe with nitrogen, enter holding room in positive demand pressure suit and open safe door. Place your items in airtight safe and close door. Close safe door and exit holding area. You should be safe!
LOL Hank
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Old November 16, 1999, 09:41 PM   #17
hksigwalther
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I think what actually occured in Mike B's case with the Goldenrod was the heat accelerating the rusting (oxidation) process with the moisture trapped in the safe. The heat would have driven the moisture out by expanding the air. Since the safe was sealed, there was nowhere for the moisture to go except react with its surroundings. The only place I can see condensation occurring would be at the walls of the safe if it was cool on the outside.

Mike did what I did. Sealed the safe and used a dessicant to draw the moisture instead of pushing it out. Plus Blue Bags. Another option to weather stripping is to use a caulk or sealant or gasket in tube. Allow to dry before closing.

- Ron V.

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