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Old October 9, 2000, 03:13 PM   #1
jtduncan
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Getting tired of chasing these crazy cottontail rabbits through thorny blackberry bushes around here in Seattle.

The family could use a good pet and I could use at least one four-legged hunting buddy. Looking for a family dog/hunting dog.

The Basset Hound and the Beagle come to mind.

Suggestions?

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Old October 9, 2000, 04:19 PM   #2
Al Thompson
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Bassets would work, but they have a real heartbreaking problem - the three we've had developed back problems and had to be put down. I'd go with a Beagle.

Giz

[This message has been edited by Gizmo99 (edited October 09, 2000).]
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Old October 9, 2000, 06:46 PM   #3
BadMedicine
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I would also go with a beagle. We had one up until I was about 5. Then it had to be put to sleep because It had real bad arthritis, it was 15 years old. They're great with kids, and aren't "too much" dog. They'd be a great family pet and hunting dog.
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Old October 10, 2000, 12:29 PM   #4
Thibault
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Beagles are great!
Excellent rabbit dogs, but some of them get overexcited while hunting and they'll follow whatever trail they'll find... deer, coyotes,porcupines.............. They tend to overnight in the bush, too. Think about bringing along a dog blanket to leave behind in case the dog decides to take extended leave.... That improves your chances of finding the damn dog the next day
They need company and affection. If you have children, they're wonderful! But the tend to get depressive if you leave them home all by themselves and some tend to destroy a lot of stuff out of sheer boredom.....
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Old October 10, 2000, 02:10 PM   #5
jtduncan
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Seems like beagles are the chosen breed.

Just got done talking to some animal shelters and it appears as if toomany hunters either don't retrieve their beagles or intentionally leave them out in the woods. In upstate New York, the pounds are flooded with beagles during hunting season.

Hunters have apparently also stopped byt he pound hoping to "use" a beagle for the day.

Scare thoughts. I just want a beagle who can help me hunt and that my young boys can play with and who'll bark when the BG comes around.

Are beagles hard to call back in from the field?

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Old October 10, 2000, 03:34 PM   #6
Thibault
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Call them back?
Good luck
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Old October 10, 2000, 05:32 PM   #7
BadMedicine
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Two things said here definatley described our beagle. "extended leave" Our dog, "hercules" would climb our chain link fence like it was a latter, jump anything shorter than 5', chew through ANY rope, and not come back until he was half dead, and about 5 lbs lighter, and for a small dog, that's alot. And "destroy alot of stuff from sheer boredom" If you get a beagle, kennel train it, and LOCK IT UP when you're not home. we locked our beagle in the kitchen, and you know those child locks you put on cabinets to keep kids out?, it didn't even slow him down, he pulled out and trashed, cereal, pasta, flour, sugar, dish washer soap, and anything else we had stored below the counter. They're still very great dogs with kids, I just recomend exstensive training while it's young, and maybe get it on whistle comands. good luck.
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Old October 11, 2000, 01:01 AM   #8
MTAA
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Beagles can be trouble, very err...uh...precocious.

Best rabbit hunting dog ? Why a Greyhound of course ! Assuming you have a decent stretch of property, a rescued Greyhound would be an interesting choice, not to mention great protection dog. Kinda weird looking though, but when they run, WOW !
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Old October 11, 2000, 06:22 AM   #9
Thibault
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Yep,
Bad Med has it all right, my grandpa had two of them, and we had two more. Best is to keep them in pairs. They are very social animals, but the kennel is an investment if you ever want resale value on your house...
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Old October 11, 2000, 02:10 PM   #10
jtduncan
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I know they only weigh about 20 pounds so the dogchow bill would be low and I have no problem giving them their post pup vaccinations, but why 2?

They like packs right? How in the world can I train two beagles at once?

Who can tell me how they did it? My old lab-rotty mix Mocha was trained real tight and she could sit in a down stay for hours as I threw T-bones in front of her and dared her to even try to sniff one. Great dog! And you had to ask to come onto my property.

Are beagles trainable to be good house dogs yet not puppy enough to **** my wife off by tearing up the house and her kitchen. I don't want to be in the doghouse!

Kenneling isn't my idea of treating a dog right unless you have a big barn.

What's the word? any good websites? I hear that training them to track is no problem, it's their gift. It's just getting them to come back and stay somewhat put that's the kicker.

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Old October 11, 2000, 04:21 PM   #11
BadMedicine
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Kenneling is a VERY VERY respectable way to train dogs. My aunt trains seeing eye dogs, and it is MANDATORY you train them this way.
You buy a kennel, the type you would use for traveling, and you put your dog in it. At night, you give them a toy, and lock them in there, then you let them out to go to the bathroom first thing in the morning, and last thing before you put them back in. If they tear somethig up, or get in trouble, say "kennel" and put them up for a while. They go barking at the door "kennel" and put them away. Pretty soon, they realize this is their room, and also, their punishment. We use the word "bedtime" at night, so they don't think they're in trouble. Their own little space. My dogs go to their kennels, just to take naps in the daytime, we don't lock it, because they just like to be there. Then, when you're gone, they can't shred anything, and if they have an "accident" it's easy to clean up, not on your carpet. Pretty soon it gets to where you say "kennel" and they head there on their own, you just have to shut and lock it.
We have two dogs kennel trained, a poodle/terrier, 6 years, and an Alaskan Husky, 1 &1/2 years. The poodle terrier no longer has to be locked in her kennel. She just goes there and sleeps at night, and no longer tears stuff up, so we let here be. The husky, however, is still a pup, and a BIG one. she goes in the kenel and it gets shut, everytime we leave, and every night.
This exspecially makes travelling a cinch. you just bring their kennels and they know excactly where to sleep, and if they get car sick, or wet at the lake or whatever, the mess is in the kennel, not your car. Trust me, this is not cruel. It's a good idea.
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Old October 11, 2000, 05:17 PM   #12
jtduncan
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Badmedicine:

I think you mean "crate" not kennel. If we're talking about the plastic square doghouses with a little wire cage in the front that our dogs "den" in, I'm cool with that.

When you're away from the home, if you breed is jumpy or destructive, crating is the best way to keep both dog and belongings in tact.

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Old October 12, 2000, 12:38 AM   #13
BadMedicine
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Ours says kennel right on it. But that may be the brand.
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Old October 12, 2000, 11:29 AM   #14
Field-dressed
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Hey JT - You should check out 'The Art of Raising a Puppy' by Those Famous Monks (?name?), and Wolter's 'Family Dog' or 'Game Dog'. These are excellent puppy-raising and training guides, well worth the investment. I agree with BadMeds on crate training except for 1 thing - don't use them for punishment. Puppies need only brief disciplining such as a scolding or scruff shaking, older dogs should be put in the down-stay which is a submissive posture. Keep the crate as the dog's refuge, since they're denning critters by nature they really take to them. Anyway, check out those books.
Dave

PS When I was a kid we used a springer spaniel on bunnies. Worked great.
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