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Old April 6, 2005, 08:56 PM   #1
fwcofficer
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Newbie to Reloading with Questions

Thinking about getting into reloading... and have a few questions: 1. Is Winchester White Box brass reloadable, and 2. I read about reloading presses and saw that the Dillon 650 was supposed to be good, how hard would it be for a newbie to reload on that press?
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Old April 6, 2005, 09:12 PM   #2
w4klr
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WWB is reloadable, I purchased an RockChucker Kit from RCBS from Basspro the other day, along with the Nosler manual and other goodies, like a tumbler, calipers etc.

I have buckets of brass, since all of my practice ammo is WWB, I have no other brass to load! My range time today consisted of all reloads thru my 1911, no problems, and no problems reloading.

I started simple, so I could learn everything there is to know, and develop an appreciation for reloading.

As a matter of fact I finished pumping out about 50 rounds of 45acp tonight in about 40 minutes (I like to take my time, it's relaxing). Maybe later when I get more experience, I'll grab a progressive press.

I'm a newborn baby to reloading... Started on Sunday. Easy, fun, and gives a bigger appreciation to shooting. I'll bet I'll soon be shooting as fast as I can just to get to my bench.

(my post was to say that WWB is reloadable, not to sway you from equipment)
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Old April 6, 2005, 10:42 PM   #3
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I would have to agree that you can get alot of milage out of a RCBS kit.A user friendly set up that will provide you with plenty of quality reloads. Starting out with a progressive like the Dillon is not out of the question and if your shooting needs require lots of ammo this would be the way to go. Dillon sells videos on several of their presses. I bought one years ago and it convinced me to buy a 550 press.The transition to a progressive was much easier for me because I had used a single stage press for many years.
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Old April 7, 2005, 12:21 AM   #4
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Dillon is out of my price range, but I am told that you can easily disable the progressive feature and use it as a single stage until you get the hang of things. I've used other progressives and there is entirely too much stuff going on for a beginner to keep track of.

If you have the money and if you are willing to use it as a single stage until you are comfortable with the basic reloading process, the Dillon 650 is probably a fine idea.
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Old April 7, 2005, 04:07 AM   #5
mtnboomer
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Start with a Lee Anniversary Reloading kit. It has almost everthing a new reloader needs - except the dies. Regardless of what some people say, it's very good equipment.
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Old April 7, 2005, 06:06 AM   #6
Ala Dan
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I will second the Supreme Master Reloading Kit from R.C.B.S. One
accessory that the regular Master Reloading Kit doesn't have is the hand priming tool. I started out many year's ago, with an R.C.B.S. Jr.
press loading for the .41 magnum. Today, I still use the single-stage
R.C.B.S. Rockchucker for all handloading chores including pistol
calibers. Yes, I know I'm old fashioned; but I prefer QUALITY ammo,
not quanity of ammo. Enjoy~

Best Wishes,
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Old April 7, 2005, 10:06 PM   #7
cheygriz
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I've been loading on Dillon progressives for over 20 years. First an old RL 450, and then about 12 years ago, I got the ultimate home reloader. (IMHO) The Dillon XL650.

Having said all that, I still think that you would be better off starting out with a high quality single stage press like the Redding Boss, Lyman Crusher, or RCBS Rockchucker.

Buy a copy of the Lyman reloading manual, and "The ABCs of reloading." and they will give you the knowledge you need to select equipment. The "kits" are a good idea, but often you end up buying a few little do-dads that you don't need. But, OTOH, you will have everyhing you do need.

Reloading! Try it, you'll like it!
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Old April 8, 2005, 12:24 PM   #8
Russ5924
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What it all comes down to is how much you shoot.If you shoot a lot 1000 rounds a month I would say go to the Dillon RL 550 or the 650.I have the 550 and can sit down and do about 300 and hour.Dillon says more but not this boy?? I started out with a LEE Turret Press with auto indexing and to me is a great press for some one just starting.It's simple to use will auto index to the next station so is hard to double charge.The big set back is it takes three or four pulls of the handle to get one round. But two hundred an hour is do able.The reason three or four you can get it with 3 or 4 holes for the dies.The 4th die is a crimping die if you don't like it go with the three.You get the whole set I think including the dies,books,powder scale just about all you need.Should be able to find it all for under a $100 try www.midwayusa.com then Cabelas has a nice shell cleaner get the whole kit I think??? about $70 been using mine about 4 years. I still use my Lee but only for short runs of odd stuff
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Old April 8, 2005, 10:12 PM   #9
rangermonroe
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I bought a cheap reloading setup from Midway USA , made by LEE a few years ago. It came with about everything that I needed except for dies, shell holders, and shell holders for the hand primer. And of couse, ball-powder-primer.

I killed a caribou with one of the rounds that I loaded with that "starter"


I live in georgia BTW.

I have outgrown the single stage, but it is still a tool in my box, and certainly not obsolete.

if you want to try, $75-100 is not a lot to invest in a new hobby that will save you money every time you play.

That is the line of Bull$h1t I gave my wife. She still thinks im saving money by loading "$400 worth of shells for $100 tonight" and shooting all of them tomorrow.
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Old April 9, 2005, 05:41 AM   #10
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Also you should have AT LEAST three, and preferably more, reloading manuals! Never use only one as misprints do happen. Never use info from others or the internet without referencing it in your manuals. The Lee Anniversery Kit will have a copy of Modern Reloading by Richard Lee. I would also suggest Lyman manuals as they, like Lee's, are not a bullet or powder company and will include loading info using different makers components - that is not to say bullet and powder maker's manuals are bad, they're not and you will want some of those too.

Remember the three most important words in reloading - SAFETY, SAFETY and SAFETY!
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Old April 9, 2005, 06:39 AM   #11
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My advice to any new reloader pretty much echos the previous posters. The best and most sophisticated equipment is junk without an understanding of what you're doing. To this end I highly recommend the ABC's of Reloading, Lyman's #48, and the NRA Guide to reloading. If you can't find them locally, check either Natchez or Midway.
As to what equipment, suggest starting with a good single stage press / kit. You will always need a single stage. They are the best way to work up some test loads that you may wish to duplicate on the progressive. Any equipment that you purchase in a starter kit will serve you when and if you go progressive in the future.
Look around. You can sometimes find some very reasonably priced used presses, powder measures etc.

Take Care
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Old April 9, 2005, 08:23 PM   #12
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Fw

Start Small With Equipment That Is Not Over Technical. Advance Slowly Till You Are Ready To Produce Ammo On A Mass Basis On A Progressive Press. You Will Appreciate It More When You Do Decide To Get A Hornady Lnl, Lee Or Dillon Progressive.

I've Heard Quite A Few Who Have Come Into The Shop And Told Me They Sure Produced A Lot Of Crummy Ammo In A Hurry Because They Did This Or Did Not Do That. Begin Slowly Untill You Fully Understand Every Facet Of What You Are Doing.

When I First Started Reloading Ca.1955 I Used A Lyman Tool. It Was Slower Than The Seven Snows Of Winter, But It Worked And Produced Good Ammo Because I Payed Attention To Details. Thats Important.

Good Luck And Safe Shooting. If Ya Need Help There Is Always Somebody Here To Give You A Shove In The Right Direction.
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Old April 10, 2005, 08:20 AM   #13
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Do yourself a favor and buy a progressive for loading pistol. It comes down to, do you want to spend all your time at the bench, or at the range? As to the original question. If you have half a brain and can use it (judging from your screen name, this shouldn't be an issue), starting with a progressive isn't a problem, it's a blessing . After taking advice from several experienced loaders, I started with the Dillon RL 550B right off the bat. Am I glad I did. You can load a single round at a time (this is what you do when setting up a round). I also reload rifle with the 550. Go for it. Dillon is a great press with a life time warrantee
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Old April 10, 2005, 09:21 AM   #14
BigBoreKindaGuy
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The Dillon 550B or 650 is an excellent choice.

The learning curve is really going to be learning the ins/outs of each stage in the reloading process. There is wisdom in having done single stage work previously before moving to progressive staging but many folks try to make reloading for beginners a rocket science and it isn't. If you follow the Dillon progressive press manual section about reloading you will understand what is going on fine.

The advise about getting 3 reloading manuals is good advice because each reloading manual manufacturer goes over their particular powder or bullet specifics plus each give their perspective on reloading which taken together pretty much fills you in on what you need to know to be safe.

Have fun...reloading is great therapy.
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Old April 10, 2005, 09:30 AM   #15
Jbar4Ranch
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The top presses of all time are probably the Lee single stage, the single stage RCBS Rock Chucker and the Dillon 550 progressive. The 650 is top of the line, but probably not the best press to learn the basics on.

I have the 550 and can sit down and do about 300 and hour.Dillon says more but not this boy??

If things are really "in the groove" for me, I can hit 400-420, but certainly not 550! 300-350 is about the norm.
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Old April 10, 2005, 06:08 PM   #16
willsjeep
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Just another vote for the Lee Anniversery Kit. I started with it about 3-4 months ago. I have been loading for 45ACP and 38/357 with it. I made some mistakes (caught them before firing), learned my lessons, fired some reloads, and fell in love with it. I just purchased a set of 223 dies and have loaded y first rifle rounds, will shoot them tomorrow.
So far, I have been satisfied with the single stage, but may upgrade later if I am able to do more shooting.
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Old April 10, 2005, 08:20 PM   #17
BigBoreKindaGuy
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JBar4Ranch "I have the 550 and can sit down and do about 300 and hour.Dillon says more but not this boy?? If things are really "in the groove" for me, I can hit 400-420, but certainly not 550! 300-350 is about the norm. "

300-350 is still good considering it would take about one hour to crank out 100 rounds on a single stage chuck. My personal best on a DIllon 650XL was 400...and I was really working up a sweat to do it. So your 350 sounds about right.
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Old April 11, 2005, 12:04 PM   #18
cheygriz
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With me, at least, speed on the 650 is a function of caliber. I can easily load 700-750 per hour of .45 ACP or Colt, and the .44s. (spec. and mag.)

Smaller calibres, like 9MM, .38 and .40, and my arthritic old fingers slow down to about 400-450 per hour.

.308, .30-06 and .233, I can generally load around 250-300 per hour.
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