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Old March 24, 2005, 08:47 PM   #1
mikemayberry
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Is it possible to overcrimp a load without buckling the brass?

I put a pretty good crimp on my latest efforts on the .44 magnum loads I am working up.

Showed them to a friend today and asked him if it was too much. He said he thought it was too much. Not any buckling of the brass but it is very defined and the most crimp I have ever gotten.

So, is it possible to get too much crimp if the brass is not buckled? I can see that it may cause the brass to weaken at the bullet line and not last as long but can you crimp so tight that you diminish your accuracy?

Thanks for your thoughts.

Mike
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Old March 24, 2005, 08:56 PM   #2
norielX
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Have you checked your OAL after crimping? I crimp after seating, as a separate step. The .357 loads I made last night shrunk .001" when I started crimping. I've had some .45 acp brass buckle pretty bad when I seated and crimped at the same time. I use the Lee FCD after seating now.
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Old March 24, 2005, 10:25 PM   #3
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I am curious about the reason why you want to crimp so hard.
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Old March 24, 2005, 11:12 PM   #4
mikemayberry
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No issues on OAL as these will be used in a single shot Encore.

I was experimenting with crimping and just seeing what the difference was. Haven't yet shot any of these but will this weekend if it doesn't rain.

I am thinking it is too much crimp but am still learning so it was more of an experiment than anything.

These are lighter loads of 17 grains of Alliant 2400 so I shouldn't have any pressure issues.

Just trying to learn what changes are good and which ones are bad.

Mike
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Old March 25, 2005, 07:40 AM   #5
WESHOOT2
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finding out

Test and see; I use an extreme crimp for certain special loads because they work better that way.
Jacketed bullets.......

But be aware you can actually crack the bullet, and perhaps some other unseen issues, when applying crimp.
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Old March 25, 2005, 12:48 PM   #6
CaptainRazor
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Quote:
The .357 loads I made last night shrunk .001" when I started crimping.
I've had the same thing happen with 38 special and 45ACP, to remedy, I either seat the bullet .001" longer, or back off the crimp die just a little bit.

Or, for plinking ammo, I just don't worry about it and leave them .001" shorter than I had intended.
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Old March 26, 2005, 08:24 AM   #7
highteckredneck
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I crimp my .44 mag loads rite to the poind of buckling. In fact every time I reload I ruin at least 1 or 2 out of 100 or so casings because of it buckling. I shoot them in a 14" TC Contender, and the heavier crimp seems to help a lot with 2400. I was having a lot of unburnt powder left behind before I started crimping this tight.

I am afraid that you will find out that your 17 grain load is way too lite to be accurate in your Encore. I had no accuiracy at all with 2400 until I got up to what most reloading manuals were calling max loads. I found out why when I purchased the TC reloading manual. Their recomendations almost all start heavier than most other reloading manuals max loads.
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Old March 26, 2005, 08:32 AM   #8
N.H. Yankee
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I use the LEE factory crimp die as it is about as goof proof as you can get, on a rimmed case it isnt as critical as a semiauto. I would rather have a heavy crimp on a magnum big bore to prevent bullet setback under recoil. Also you can decrease the caselife with too much crimp, so there is a delicate zone to work with at times. Like I said the LEE factory crimp die is great and I use them for everything I reload.
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Old March 26, 2005, 10:09 AM   #9
WESHOOT2
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"setback" vs "crimp jump"

Autos jam the bullet back into the case during the feed cycle: setback.

Revolvers slam the bullet forward out of their case during firing: jump.

Both bad.

If my load is sufficient to require extreme crimping measures then case life will not be an issue, ay?
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