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Old September 30, 2002, 04:52 PM   #1
Bacchus
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Lubing cases and reloading speed

I've been reloading pistol cartridges for about a year now with a single stage and can comfortably load 60 or more per hour. However, I'm really new to rifle reloading and having some problems with the depriming/resizing step.

First, I've had to slow down to a crawl. I've found that my reloading is really slow due to lubing cases. Are progressives that much faster for rifle reloading, too?

Second, my new die set (308) isn't resizing the brass, so the bullet won't fit. I'm used to depriming with one die and resizing with another for pistols, but the rifle dies don't have that option.

Can anyone suggest troubleshooting for that problem?
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Old September 30, 2002, 07:06 PM   #2
Southla1
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Well Bacchus there is no getting around the fact tht you have to lube em...........not everyone mind you but at least 1 or 2 out of 3. I have been using some Lyman spray and its ok. Not as slick as RCBS lube but ok. Got to spray everyone too but it dries and is not messy.

I never really had a "slow down" problem when I use the lube pad either. Just make sure you don't get it on too thick or you will get lube dents on the shoulder.

Withoug knowing if the bullet is too tight or too loose in the case I can't really answer about the sizing but I suspect the die needs adjusting. Read the instructions close and see if that may be the problem.
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Old September 30, 2002, 10:47 PM   #3
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When I load .223's on my Dillon RL550B, I can get a rate of 200 rounds / hour going at a relaxed pace. I lube the cases by setting them side by side at the bottom of a large cardboard box, and make several sprays of Dillon's spray lube. After 5 minutes, they are ready to go.
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Old October 1, 2002, 07:00 AM   #4
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Difference

I think one of the issues is that in loading pistol rounds the case is flared to accept the bullet and in loading rifle rounds the case is not flared. With rifle rounds, you have to guide the bullet on top of the case into the seating die.
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Old October 1, 2002, 07:14 AM   #5
DAVID NANCARROW
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If you are loading for a bolt gun, get Lee's collet neck sizer and you won't have to lube the case.
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Old October 1, 2002, 08:53 AM   #6
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I think that your point is right on, jw, about the flared case (or lack of them). With pistol bullets, I usually place the bullet in the case and pull the handle, which seats it correctly. But I noticed that the rifle bullet would not "sit" on top/in the case on its own. However, if I hold it there and pull the handle, it seats the bullet to the correct depth. Is that what others have to do?
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Old October 1, 2002, 10:17 AM   #7
Steve Smith
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"But I noticed that the rifle bullet would not "sit" on top/in the case on its own. However, if I hold it there and pull the handle, it seats the bullet to the correct depth. Is that what others have to do?"

I don't use flat based bullets, so no. Boat tails sit in really nicely. Flat based bullets are a PITA when you're used to pistols and boat tailed rifle bullets.

For your first question, I use a Dillon 550 for my match rifle loads. I load them like Chemistry does, just lay them about, give them a squirt or two, shake, and maybe one more squirt (roughly three squirts for about 200-300 cases.) Load 'em up...it'll on;y take an hour.
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Old October 1, 2002, 11:39 AM   #8
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For cases that are spray lubed in a box, do you clean the lube off after sizing or do you just keep on loading using your progressive press and not worry about the lube? Does the lube affect the case gripping the chamber during firing potentially causing pressure problems?
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Old October 1, 2002, 11:56 AM   #9
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You wait until you're done loading the cartridges.


Hell, I hardly do that anymore!
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Old October 1, 2002, 04:00 PM   #10
jw29650
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Do you wash the lube off with a soapy cloth or do you tumble the loaded rounds in corn cob media to remove the lube?
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Old October 1, 2002, 04:23 PM   #11
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What I do when shooting a benchrest match:

Start rifle cleaning process, including bore soaking/brushing...

Take fired rounds out of case. Wipe necks with 0000 steel wool. Rub fingers in a tin of Imperial Die wax, and lightly rub onto cases. Size (deprimes). Wipe cases with towel. Clean primer pockets with Skip Otto uniformer. Prime using K&M primer (or a Lee). Charge cases. Inspect powder. Seat bullets using arbor press and Carstensen seater.

Patch out rifle with three wet patches, then three dry patches, then one patch with lock-eze on it. Wipe chamber with .45 bore swab. Lube bolt.

All that in under 23 minutes.


When "bulk loading" I put the brass in a big box, spray it with lube, shake it around, spray it again, shake it, spray it, then size it. I clean it in the tumbler.
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Old October 1, 2002, 07:09 PM   #12
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I've been using the RCBS spray lube for my .303, 1 inch deep aluminium foil pan (I think I paid $.30 for 3), dump in brass, spray spray, roll around, wait 5, away we go.

never bothered cleaning them after lubing, never had a problem.
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Old October 1, 2002, 07:53 PM   #13
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JW, you can search here for what has been said about tumbling live rounds. That said, I do it. The spray lubes as mentioned above do not take long to come off in your media of choice.

The only real problem that I see with tumbling live rounds is with changing the burning rate of the powder by wearing the coatings off the powder. I use a bulk powder that I have proven to myself that does not change it's burning rate after a very short time in the tumbler.

Boat Tails just make the entire job easier and quicker. Better on your fingers as well.
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