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Old May 4, 1999, 03:12 PM   #26
Alpha
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Put steel ball bearings the size of buckshot in a shotshell. Use it against hard targets or penetration through glass.
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Old May 4, 1999, 04:11 PM   #27
dundee
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to John G.
a cheap way to experement with shotgun loads is to use a sharp instrument to open the crimp. I used a dart since that was handy, then dump the lead shot out and insert the new projectiles. To close the crimp of the shotshell I used a old Lee Loader kit that I paid $9 for many years ago.

I have never loaded rocksalt but it should not be difficult by this method. I used to open trap loads and after removing the #8 shot inserted 9 pellets of 0 buckshot. This worked just fine for IPSC matches, low recoil and enough energy to take down the plates. I believe the "tacical" load from Federal and others can be duplicated this way.
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Old May 6, 1999, 02:05 PM   #28
headroom
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00 buck can be made to shoot through something like a quarter inch of steel if the shotshell is cut around the base, leaving just a couple little tabs to hold it together, similar to door breaching shells.
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Old May 7, 1999, 01:18 AM   #29
Menos
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Headroom.... HALT!!!! never put a solid hard object that chamber sized and expect it to safely transit the barrel... the pressures are HUGELY increased and barrel failure is very possible. If you want a good door load , use 12 or 16 pellets of #1 buck , its still 30 caliber and is also the best anti personel round possible... whats 9 33cal vs 12 30 cal??? I'll go with 12 vs 9 any time.

Also a great tactic for CQC is to shoot the buckshot into a hard pavement 1/2 to 3/4 of the distance to the target. The shot tends to become flattened washers and are very nasty to the BG's legs and torso.

You can also put mollasses into the buckshot and that holds it close together for a longer distance.

Be safe.... never exceed safe parameters.

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Old May 9, 1999, 10:12 AM   #30
Keith Rogan
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The simplest, safest (to the shooter) and most twisted round is called the "cut-shell".
Using light bird shot, you merely cut the circumference of the plastic just over the wadding with a deep groove. When you fire the shell the entire shot charge comes out as a projectile encased in the plastic casing. When it strikes a target its something like a hand grenade going off.


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Old May 11, 1999, 03:56 PM   #31
cornered rat
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"Pre-cut" shot shell is the same concept as Glaser...only a Glaser scaled up to 12ga size. It could work...

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Old May 15, 1999, 03:15 PM   #32
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This is a sick'n'twisted load I thought about last night after reading this thread. If you could get shot that was hollowed out and then filled with a toxic substance say Mercury. When the shot hit a person, the shot should deform enough to release the substance into the target. Is that sick'n'twisted enough?
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Old May 17, 1999, 07:07 PM   #33
spark@onestopknifeshop.com
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There used to be a round called the Remington SP4xBB, I don't know if they still make it.

Anyhow, I believe it had 9 rounds of #4 shot, and was followed by a few layers of BB's. Pretty nasty stuff. Wish I could find them still...

The Flechette rounds are pretty cool, I had the opportunity to get a case of them and missed out on it, unfortunately.

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Old May 19, 1999, 02:55 PM   #34
David Z
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Make a cut-shell round, but dump out the lead shot and replace it with birdshot-sized balls of metallic sodium (sealed up from moisture, naturally). Assuming the cut-shell works as designed, it will break apart when it hits, and fill the target with a zillion chunks of sodium. Sodium reacts violently with water, producing heat and hydrogen gas... so the wound will heat up massively, and in fact will be actually flaming. The residue left in the wound after this reaction is sodium hydroxide (lye). Yikes!

[This message has been edited by David Z (edited May 19, 1999).]
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Old May 25, 1999, 01:31 PM   #35
RacerX
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Here's an unusual one, not so much a super-nasty defense load, but a quiet deer-poaching trick:

Take your kid's break-action .410 single shot and one .410 shell (standard or magnum), pry open the shell crimp and pour out the shot charge. Leave the shotcup or wad in place, along with the powder charge.

Next, get an aluminum hunting arrow, the kind with flexible rubber fletching. Stick the arrow's nock into the .410 case. Carefully roll the "feathers" against the arrow shaft and cram the entire arrow and shell into the breech. The tip of the arrow should clear the muzzle by a few inches, even squeezing through the full choke that is common in single-shot scatterguns. You complete it by screwing the hunting broadhead in place.

When fired, the arrow springs from the muzzle with a muted *POP*, since there is less compression on the powder charge. As the arrow clears the muzzle, those rubber fins pop right back out, stabilizing the arrow. With practice, it is a very effective way of harvesting deer that lurk out there beyond bow range. Typically, the arrow goes clean through.
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