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Old February 2, 2013, 11:55 AM   #77
Sarge
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 12, 2002
Location: MO
Posts: 5,038
Some years back I hit a 150 pound doe with a .44/300/XTP at less than 20 yards, from a 5 1/2" Redhawk. I'd chronographed the load at 1310 fps and shot it into enough water jugs, wet-pack etc. to know it would expand well within the first hundred yards.

Everything was perfect... I was sitting in a low tree stand, the doe stopped, and the front sight settled exactly where the shoulders meet the spine. My press-off was perfect. What I didn't count on was the yearling that snuck up behind her and shoved his cold nose under her udder.

My 'perfect shot' turned into 'How the #&@**$ did she get over THERE??' She took off at a sprint down a 200 yard grown-up waterway, towards some woods with a big creek running through them. I thought 'I know I hit her good' and bailed outta the tree to pick up my deer.

I immediately picked up a bright red blood trail, high on the brush she passed, so I figured '50 yards tops'. 45 minutes and 275 yards later, I found her dead in a creek bottom a full 300 yards from where I shot her.

I learned that she moved as I shot her, and I hit her a good 5-6 inches behind the shoulder, right under the spine. The bullet had still expanded which was evident from the quarter-sized exit, and it clipped the major vessels along the spine. I learned something from that.... if you hit them too far back, you are in for a tracking job. I've found several dead deer in the woods over the years, lost by the folks who shot them in almost exactly the spot I hit that doe.

I've got a few rounds of Leverevolution (or whatever you call it) 30-30 laying around here but Ive never killed anything with it. I'm quite happy with the Sierra 150 over 34.0 grains of H4895 or Winchester's Power Point factory load. I do use the Nosler 150 BT at 2940 from a 30-06 and at 220 yards, it still smashes deer like Thor's hammer.

Assuming a good hit
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“Nine-tenths of tactics are certain, and taught in books: but the irrational tenth is like the kingfisher flashing across the pool, and that is the test of generals. It can only be ensured by instinct, sharpened by thought practicing the stroke so often that at the crisis it is as natural as a reflex.” ~ T. E. Lawrence
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