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Old December 3, 2012, 01:51 PM   #9
Frank Ettin
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Join Date: November 23, 2005
Location: California - San Francisco
Posts: 6,539
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmortimer
...I doubt you will find any first rate tactical training group/company/instructor that would suggest otherwise...
Sir, please be advised that Kathy Jackson (pax) is a first rate tactical training instructor.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmortimer
...That you were a passenger in a car and took a nap and determined to go to Condition White was your choice, but you also could have stored your handgun while you slept...
Now that would be just silly. As a matter of safety, it's best to avoid handling a gun if possible. The safest place for pax' sidearm was in her holster, on her person.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmortimer
...Now I get it, that you have to rationalize "constant-carry" as I call it, when you are at home, as you have gone on record as such. You have a vested financial interest to parrot the same rather than admit that "constant carry" is is a huge compromise on the joy of life...
It should not, however, be necessary to point out to you that pax is a member here, a moderator here and a well known and respect instructor. Your casting aspersions on her motivation is out of line.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmortimer
...let's be clear that it was never intended that someone stay in Condition Yellow as long as one is awake. It takes some effort to stay in this state, and ultimately is unhealthy...
Where do you get that? In fact, that standard formulations of Condition Yellow (see post 3), contradict you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmortimer
...Generally condition white gets dismissed quickly as being “unaware” or “unprepared” and students are admonished to “not be in condition white.” Unfortunately it is neither possible nor even desirable for this to be true. This belief that condition white is undesirable stems from people thinking it comes from not paying attention, when in fact it is just as likely to driven by paying too much attention to something...
Not according to Jeff Cooper (Jeff Cooper's Commentaries, Vol. 13, pg.4, emphasis added)
Quote:
...The Color Code refers not to a condition of peril, but rather to a condition of readiness to take life. Fortunately most people are very reluctant to take lethal action against another human being. Most people are reluctant to shoot for blood on a harmless game animal, until they become used to it. To press the trigger on a human adversary calls for a wrenching effort of will which is always difficult to achieve and sometimes apparently impossible. Thus we live our days in Condition White, which may or may not have anything to do with our danger, since quite frequently we are in deadly danger and do not realize it. Any time you cross directions out on a two−lane highway you are at the mercy of that character coming towards you in the opposite direction. Usually he is okay, but when he is under some sort of chemical influence, or is psychologically upset, he may only twitch his wheel to produce a multiple fatal accident. Most of us would prefer to live in Condition White permanently, and many do, but those who are more aware of the nature of things are often in Yellow, which is a condition in which we are aware that the world is full of hazards which are human, and some of which may be obviated by our own defensive action. When one is in Condition Yellow he is aware that today may be the day. He is not in a combat mood, nor is he aware of any specific situation which may call for action on his part. There is a vital difference between White and Yellow, and it has to do not with any specific enemy or a set of circumstances, but rather with your awareness that you individually may have to take decisive action on this very day. If you are attacked in Condition White, you will probably die, or at least need a stretcher. If you are attacked in Condition Yellow, you will probably win, assuming that you are armed, awake and aware. The difference does not lie in the deadliness of the hazard facing you, but rather in your willingness to take a very unusual action...
__________________
"It is long been a principle of ours that one is no more armed because he has possession of a firearm than he is a musician because he owns a piano. There is no point in having a gun if you are not capable of using it skillfully." -- Jeff Cooper
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