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Old November 12, 2012, 01:27 PM   #19
F. Guffey
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 18, 2008
Posts: 2,798
“I have other case measuring tools depending on what I am trying to accomplish but for setting up dies the case gauge is simple and foolproof”

No such thing as foolproof, fools do not read, listen, consider other remedies, methods and or technique. The Wislon case gage is not a drop-in gage, from the big inning L.E. Wilson understood the concept of ‘DATUMS’ when a case is inserted into a Wilson case gage it does not set on the shoulder in the gage, it sits on a datum with a radius, back to “for setting up dies the case gauge is simple and foolproof”, if it was foolproof the owner and user of the case gage would know and understand how to adjust the die from the measurement as in from the datum to the top the head of the case when adjusting the FL die. Most owners of the Wilson case gage use their thumb nail, me? I am not that good, I use a straight edge, Wilson suggest using the pocket rule??? as a straight edge like a pocket rule is included in a list of tools found on the bench or pocket of a reloader, and then there is the thickness gage/feeler gage as in laying the straight edge across the top of the case and or gage to measure opens as in open pointers?

Length of the chamber, again, this stuff does not run me into a curb, the practice of firing a case to forum is not necessary, becoming familiar with the tools and their function is not necessary as demonstrated by some of the answers/responses. After firing I eject once fired cases, the accepted practice in reloading is to fire to form , then it goes round and round, full length size? Neck size? A reloader that is familiar with the press, the die, the shell holder and has a good understanding of thread/incline plane can form cases to fit before firing, back to my favorite cases, first, the 280 Remington, there is no way I can fail to size a case for the 30/06 family of chambers, again, the 280 Remington case is longer from the head of the case to the shoulder/datums by .051” as in chambering a 280 Remington case in a 30/06 chamber, the protruding case head of the 280 Remington case will cause the bolt to protrude from the rear of the receiver by .051” less the difference in length between a go-gage chamber and a minimum length sized/ new, factor loaded round ‘in the perfect world’.


“I have other case measuring tools depending on what I am trying to accomplish.....” again, this stuff does not drive me to the curb, or lock me up, back to the 280 Remington case in the 30/06 chamber, if a reloader has a good understanding of tools and their use and can measure the length of the 280 Remington case from the head of the case to its shoulder, the same reloader that can use the 280 Remington case length from the usual places can use the case to measure the length of the chamber in thousandths, my problem when teaching that concept is getting someone to understand the concept of .000” (ZERO).

Back to the smith in Utah, he used one gage to measure the length of the chamber from the face of the bolt to the shoulder/datums of the chamber. Reloaders and smiths have blamed him for all the M1917 chambers that are long from the bolt face to the shoulder of the chamber. OGEK, they never ask him “HOW DO YOU DO THAT?” Instead they mindlessly attempted chambering a field reject gage, if the field reject gage would not allow the bolt to close the attempted the no go-gage, if the no go-gage would not allow the bolt to close they went for the go-gage, and I ask “WHO DID NOT KNOW THE BOLT WOULD CLOSE ON THE GO-GAGE? With all that effort, not one of the smiths could indicate the length of the chamber in thousandths.

I have a Eddystone M1917 with a long chamber, not a problem, I form/size 280 Remington cases by erasing the shoulder of the 280 Remington case and reforming it .037” back, or .014” ahead of the 30/06 shoulder. I am the fan of cutting down on all that case travel and, NO! my case heads do not separate, my cases, when fired can not run to the front of the chamber when avoiding the primer strike, my firing pins are mechanically driven with a spring.

F. Guffey

Last edited by F. Guffey; November 12, 2012 at 01:28 PM. Reason: change o to an i
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