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Old November 19, 2011, 07:23 PM   #122
American Made
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Join Date: September 21, 2011
Location: Idaho
Posts: 92
You know some states don't like the fed govt because the feds can push them around. They want all of the control(to include the politicians). The fact is, there are goods and bads to both states and fed govts. the federal government of the United States of America is not all that bad and has done some good things for the country. I do agree this world seems a little more tangled and complicated these days...hopefully someday we can loosen up some of the excess baggage and get back to basics.
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I dare not speak for my fellow Marine brethren, but as far as I'm concerned, I think you may be surprised to discover how much more similar-minded we are in thought than different. I will not dispute for one moment that the American Civil War did to the federal/state relationship what many claim it did; I'll even go so far as to do you two better: there was some "watershed" movement at the beginning of the 20th century that allowed the feds to claim even more power for themselves, and then, of course, World War II and its immediate aftermath allowed the feds to consolidate that power, cement its standing, and extend it even more.

I absolutely believe in the "radical" notions of the right to secession and the right of a people to self-determination. If, God forbid, it ever came to something drastic, for myself, I know with whom I'd stand.

My kin are some of those brave "Yankees" who, some two and a half centuries ago, stood up to the tyranny of a foreign government by defending their homes, enterprises, and farms with their lives in the name of self-government and self-determination. The challenge they faced, and the risks they willingly shouldered, are on par with those we face today. Many of us carry on that same tradition. We want exactly what you want; it doesn't matter if our accents are different, or if our blood and our hearts are connected to a different homeland.

Perhaps I'm more amused by those around this country who feel such sentiments are entitled only to those who, by accident of birth or bloodline, happen to find themselves on one side of an arbitrarily-drawn geographic line; and those who feel that the proper resolution to the troubles in which we find ourselves is best addressed through the resurrection of old animosities which should remain buried in the past. I am definitely guilty of needling those who feel this way. But I think they do far more harm than good to our cause.

I took an oath to support the Constitution of the United States, and from that time to this, understood the term is in plurality. This Country is composed of States; and when that Government which was established by those States, and that flag, which bears upon it's broad folds and stars, representing those States, is used for the purpose of coercing some of those States, I say my flag I took a bullet for has already been degraded.

The Federalist No. 39
Conformity of the Plan to Republican Principles:

That it will be a federal and not a national act, as these terms are understood by the objectors; the act of the people, as forming so many independent States, not as forming one aggregate nation, is obvious from this single consideration, that it is to result neither from the decision of a majority of the people of the Union, nor from that of a majority of the States. It must result from the unanimous assent of the several States that are parties to it, differing no otherwise from their ordinary assent than in its being expressed, not by the legislative authority, but by that of the people themselves. Were the people regarded in this transaction as forming one nation, the will of the majority of the whole people of the United States would bind the minority, in the same manner as the majority in each State must bind the minority; and the will of the majority must be determined either by a comparison of the individual votes, or by considering the will of the majority of the States as evidence of the will of a majority of the people of the United States. Neither of these rules have been adopted. Each State, in ratifying the Constitution, is considered as a sovereign body, independent of all others, and only to be bound by its own voluntary act. In this relation, then, the new Constitution will, if established, be a federal, and not a national constitution.

Last edited by American Made; November 19, 2011 at 07:34 PM.
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