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Old November 5, 2010, 11:23 PM   #5
LanceOregon
Junior member
 
Join Date: May 10, 2008
Location: Oregon
Posts: 2,774
Quote:
To tell the truth, I'm amazed I have more than just my own vote.
Well, it is your gun that is going over so well. It is such an interesting historical piece to look at. And all of that wear on it gives the pistol a lot of character too. You are lucky to have such a fine firearm in your collection.

For a tip for the future, try to provide some lighting that is less flat in nature. The photo itself is rather drab looking, as far as the lighting goes. In addition, photographing anything with a white background will result in an underexposure, which is also contributing to the poor quality of the exposure itself. Try to use a medium background that is neither too light or too dark in color. Or if you do shoot with a white background, remember that you have to override the camera's exposure and increase it, in order to compensate for the increased reflective ability of the color white. That increased reflection is tricking the camera into thinking that there is more light than there really is, thus resulting in an underexposed image.

The exposure meters on cameras all assume a world that reflects light like a light color grey. While that usually works fine most of the time, it will not in a situation like this one.

You can do things with photo editing software to correct such issues too. Photoshop Elements only costs $80, and can do a lot to help with such problems. For example, I ran your photo through Photoshop Elements, and was able to produce this. You can see that the photo now has more "Pop" to it, and no longer looks so drab.




So do consider getting some decent photo editing software, and you will learn to be able to enjoy the hobby of digital photography even more.

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