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Old March 19, 2008, 09:33 PM   #4
ISP2605
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Join Date: November 25, 2002
Posts: 954
Quote:
If you love your 9mm, so be it, but larger-caliber bullets do a much better job of penetrating auto glass and sheet metal while retaining the ability to create a serious wound on the other side. A very convincing argument can be made for changing to a .40 or .45-caliber auto pistol.
Whoever claims authorship of this article should do a bit more research on his own instead of claiming "one size fits all." If they had done credible research then they would have known that 9mm penetration of auto glass and sheet metal routinely exceeds that of .45. That's one of 9mm's selling points.
But then, sounds like the author already had his mind made up so whatever "fill" he includes really isn't credible but just "fill".

Quote:
If you stick with a major brand that uses bullets designed to meet the FBI’s comprehensive test protocol, you’ll be sending your officers out well armed.
What if the agency decides the FBI"s "comprehensive test protocol" isn't what that particular agency needs? The Border Patrol uses 8" instead of the FBI's sacred 12". And the BP is involved in a lot more shootings that the FBI. Also don't forget that pre-1986 the FBI also had "comprehensive test protocols" involving RII and the "computer man". Their "comprehensive test protocols" during that time touted rapid expansion, limited penetration. And at that time my agency's testing showed that rapid expansion, limited penetration really wasn't the optimal performance. We even sent our range people to Q to discuss our testing with them. But the FBI knew better because they had their "comprehensive test protocols." Then post-1986 the FBI's "comprehensive test protocols" claimed the W-W 147 Subsonic was THE ONLY 9mm any serious dept should carry. Once more our range guys showed the guys at Q that the W-W 147 Subsonic wasn't up to what was needed on the street. But the FBI had their "comprehensive test protocols" and they knew better. Didn't matter that my agency was shooting a lot more people with the 9mm that the FBI did in the entire time they carried the 9. After a few years of getting shooting results from the field from other depts did people wake up and realize that the FBI's "comprehensive test protocols" for the 147 Subsonic really didn't work that well on the street. So the FBI revised their "comprehensive test protocals" and admitted that round wasn't the best that they had thought. Gee, wonder where they'd heard that before?

Sounds like the author is another one of those gun rag authors who gets paid by the word because the facts sure don't support some of his assertions.
And, yes, I was involved in testing of handguns for my dept when I was commanding R&D.
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