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Old October 26, 2005, 09:51 PM   #24
Double Naught Spy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 8, 2001
Location: Forestburg, Montague County, Texas
Posts: 10,344
You know, Stormtrooper, sometimes clarification is a good thing. I probably would not have noticed had you not called it a "real" scenario. It turned out to be an interesting bit of research to figure out if you can have "real" scenarios or not. From what I found, "we" tend to use the term quite loosely, actually wrong in many cases and I have done it as well.

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Long Path, as I understand it, unprosecuted incidents of domestic abuse will not negate a person from becoming a LEO in Texas, but those incidents most certainly can keep a regular person from getting a CHL. Plus, the regular person's juvy record is part of the CHL background which I don't believe is part of the LEO background check. So a CHL applicant can be kept from getting a CHL based on crimes as a juvenile.

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Under no known documents or treaties between Texas and the United States was Texas ever given the right to secede by Texas' own choice. The supposed right is simply a Texas tall tale. Some folks claim that the right to secede was penned in the original agreements of annexation or on entering the US again after the Civil War, but these documents have been lost and their original text supposedly rewritten without the section on the right to secede. Of course the claim is bogus. How would Texas historians know the secession text actually existed if there are no documents anywhere to support their claim?

Here are some references along with links to original texts...

http://www.snopes.com/history/american/texas.asp

http://www.wepin.com/rotstuff/Texas%...0of%201845.htm

http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/ref/about...march1845.html, but that didn't allow for anything concerning secession either.

As a product of annexation, Texas did give up territory to the US government, the territorial holdings of Texas inclusive of lands that are now part of 5 additional states Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Wyoming and in exchange, the US assumed all of the Republic of Texas' debts. http://www.answers.com/topic/republic-of-texas. So, as a part of being annexed, the US took over all of our debts. Since they took over our debts, there would be no way that they would allow us to secede, otherwise, we would have joined the US to get our debts handled and then just secede and return to our previous independent status, but with no debts.

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In response to stephen426's statement...
[/QUOTE]...splitting from the U.S. is considered treason. [/QUOTE]

Sulaco2 countered with[QUOTE]
Considered such only by power and control happy feds. There is nothing in the constitution that forbids a state from leaving except armed force by the government in power which has been used once in the late unpleasentness between the north and south. Today it would be fought out in Fed court until the courts ruled as our owners in DC want then they would leave anyway....[QUOTE]

Sure enough Sulaco2, it would only be considered treason by the federal government and not by those wanting to secde. That is how treason works. Treason is a crime of disloyalty to one's own nation which is usually recognized by intentional acts that result in harm to the nation. Secession by Texas would harm the US and steal from it a large section of its geography.

You are right in that there is nothing in the Constitution that forbids a state by seceding. Then again, the Constition doesn't cover many things. So, not being in the Constitution, however, does not mean states can secede as part of a unilateral decision on the state's part without the blessing of the US. The Constition does not give the US the right to annex lands. It does not provide the guidelines for how lands can be annexed. Think about it, the Constition is not the only document written that governs our country.

So, where would you find information on how the US annexes lands and stipulates the conditions for annexation?

These things can be found in the Articles of Confederation. Check Article XIII. You will see that as part of the agreement to join the US, states agree to a perpetual relationship with the US. The only way a state can legally secede is by approval of the US gov and its other states making up the US.

Here is article XIII...

Quote:
Every State shall abide by the determination of the United States in Congress assembled, on all questions which by this confederation are submitted to them. And the Articles of this Confederation shall be inviolably observed by every State, and the Union shall be perpetual; nor shall any alteration at any time hereafter be made in any of them; unless such alteration be agreed to in a Congress of the United States, and be afterwards confirmed by the legislatures of every State.
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