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dwestfall
September 5, 2001, 05:03 PM
What's the 16ga good for? I don't see much ammo for it. I guess it was eclipsed by the 12 and 20?

My uncle has a 16ga SxS and an old Browning semi-auto in 16ga.

K80Geoff
September 5, 2001, 07:00 PM
Some upland hunters consider the 16 GA to be the ideal gun for Quail and Woodcock and other gamebirds. The 16 is supposed to throw great patterns because of the shot to barrel diameter ratio or some such technical drivel.

I guess it all adds up to what you like.

There are still a lot of 16 ga guns in use out there, though not many 16 ga guns are made anymore. Shells are getting scarce and their quality is not that good. The major shell manufacturers only seem to want to make promo or cheapie loads for the 16. No AA'a or STS shells.

At least they are cheaper than 28GA shells :mad:


Geoff Ross

huntsman
September 5, 2001, 08:18 PM
the 16 makes a good upland gun if it's about 6 to 6-3/4#. most are closer to 7 pounds, at that you might as well carry a 12. With the lighter 20 and 28's out there the 16 is just a memory .

JAMES L.SMITH
September 5, 2001, 09:28 PM
I'll let you know after hunting season.I'v bought 3 in the past year,never cared much for them-BUT-as I get older my careing changes.:)

Dave McC
September 6, 2001, 11:01 AM
Back in the days of paper shells and iron men(G), the well heeled shotgunner had a 16 for upland work, and a heavy 12 or 10 ga for waterfowl. As things progressed, the 12 became the all around shotgun and the 16 got kinda squeezed out. The ammo and gun makers used the 12 to reduce the variety of loads they had to make. The gun makers started mounting 16 gauges on 12 ga receivers, so one ended up with a shotgun that carried like a 12 and shot like a 20, when the reverse had been the case before.

Lots of us started out with a 16, including me. A 6 lb shotgun handling an oz of shot is still darn near optimum for uplands, and a case can be made for it as a lady's all around gun when weight is kept sane and one doesn't go for barnburner loads.

A while back, some of us quietly bought all the good 16s we could. Back then, often a Parker,Fox, Ithaca or Baker 16 would run half of what a 20 ga of same model and condition did. It's different now, many folks have found the 16's a better choice than a light 20 with its barknbite from heavy loads.

If I ever win the Lottery, or answer all of Regis's questions, one toy I'd almost certainly get would be a nice 16 ga SXS....

Kobra
September 6, 2001, 12:25 PM
I too grew up on 16 ga's. My dad never owned a shotgun that wasn't a 16ga. His Browning A-5 16ga Sweet Sixteen is one of my favorite shotguns of all time.

Mannlicher
September 6, 2001, 01:15 PM
I have a beautiful Browning A-5 Sweet 16, and would not trade it for anything. I did 'ruin' it and had choke tubes installed some years back, but it is one "sweet shooting" shotgun. I also have a double SxS Stevens shotgun, with 18 inch barrels. I like this one as a bedside gun, or to carry under a blanket in the pick up truck. #1 buck is pretty effective against soft skinned things.

dwestfall
September 6, 2001, 01:23 PM
Funny... I think my Uncles are the Sweet 16 and a Stevens SxS as well.

You can get #1 Buck for 16ga? That's not bad then.

OkieCruffler
September 6, 2001, 04:21 PM
I just lucked into an Ithica mod. 37 in 16 at the same time I was looking for a shotgun for my left handed wife. She actually enjoys shooting it. MIlder recoil than the 12 but easier to hit with than the 20 (or so she's convinced). Now she has more fun going with me to bust clays, but I've lost my full-time trap puller.