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SRH78
October 14, 2012, 07:28 PM
Other than a high quality barrel and trigger, what are the keys to building a very accurate AR?

insomni
October 14, 2012, 07:38 PM
Proper sight picture, breath control, trigger squeeze


only half way kidding, because the AR is a decently accurate platform as far as service rifles go.

The only actual part I could think of to add is a quality buttstock to help with the stability of the entire platform. floppy buttstocks aren't good for accuracy in general. This is the compromise of a carbine length stock

Metal god
October 14, 2012, 08:34 PM
There are 3 more things needed for sure IMO . 1) A fixed but stock you can get a consistant check weld with . 2) A free float hand gaurd to keep all presures off the barrel . 3) Quality ammo , I can't emphasize this enough .

kilotanker22
October 14, 2012, 09:05 PM
As a prior service member I would recommend a colt defense m-4 a-3 was my service rifle and stock would group 2 moa all day long with a red dot and m-835 lake city ammo. I would recommend though making sure to use a rate of twist to match the bullet in question. 1 in 7 twist with a 77 grain fmj will give you fine results in the model listed above.

kilotanker22
October 14, 2012, 09:07 PM
O by the way if shooting without rest the closer your elbows are to your body the better you will be. Also try an after market trigger

iraiam
October 14, 2012, 09:47 PM
I would suggest that AR accuracy is acceptable right out of the box, with quality ammo, for a service rifle.

For very good accuracy I shoot a match grade Colt. If I want to plink I just put my blasting upper on it or use my SP1, I also have a varmint upper for the same rifle, basically just another target grade flat top upper with a scope.

My most accurate setups are without a chrome lined bore, quality hand loads, match ammo is very good also.

Achilles11B
October 14, 2012, 10:54 PM
Good barrel, good trigger, good ammo and good fundamentals. That's all you need.

Chris_B
October 15, 2012, 06:04 PM
I been praying to Jubu each night before shooting

Whatever works

insomni
October 15, 2012, 08:43 PM
the Lake City ammo tanker is talking about is the M-855 round with the green tip. Prices are going down right now on those because the army is now issuing an A1 variant of the round. It shoots really well, but you'll probably squeeze more accuracy out of a match grade round from Hornady or Black Hills.

Justice06RR
October 15, 2012, 10:09 PM
Practice makes perfect. You're equipment is accurate enough, you need to work on the shooter.

Practice and learn all the proper shooting techniques. This can make all the difference. Having a good AR and ammo is a big plus.

bedlamite
October 16, 2012, 01:17 AM
It depends on what you call accurate. 2 moa is ok for a basic M4gery, but don't bother bringing that to a high power match. To take a step up from an out of the box rifle, Metal God is right; fixed stock, ff handguard, and lots of good ammo to practice with.

10mmAuto
October 16, 2012, 01:28 AM
Good, floated barrel with heavy contour, good upper receiver, good fit and finish, full size receiver extension, full length gas system, proper weight buffer and spring, good quality FA BCG, handloads.

10mmAuto
October 16, 2012, 01:34 AM
Practice makes perfect. You're equipment is accurate enough, you need to work on the shooter.

Well intentioned but bad advice considering you don't know what he's got or his skill level. With good fundamentals, half decent optics and a good system for resting the weapon when firing you'll be hindered by the mechanical accuracy of a 1.5 or 2MOA gun within your ballistic point blank and especially longer ranges if you've got good dope.

thinkingman
October 16, 2012, 01:46 AM
MetalGod gave you excellent advice.
This trend to CB's is not going to help one bit in the accuracy game.
If you think a Colt is accurate, get a Rock River or WhiteOak...not even the same ball game.
If you REALLY want accuracy, fill every space available with lead shot.
The best guns on the line at CMP weigh about 13lbs.

Chris_B
October 16, 2012, 07:07 AM
Jubu's not going to be pleased about that one bit, I'll tell you

SRH78
October 16, 2012, 08:19 AM
Thanks guys. Here is a little more info. This will be my first AR so I am certainly green where they are concerned. Ammo won't be a problem because I roll my own. Any rifle that isn't sub moa is not accurate in my book. I would like to get .5 moa or better, preferably better. I am trying to find out what parts I need to pony up on or any additional work that might need to be done to yield the best results.

As for weight, it certainly makes a rifle easier to shoot but I want to keep the weight on this rifle reasonable. For lack of a better way to describe it, consider this rifle a walking varminter.

"full size receiver extension, proper weighted buffer"

I assume proper weighted buffer means not overly light?

Would you mind explaining the receiver extension? That is something totally new to me.

madcratebuilder
October 18, 2012, 07:29 AM
As for weight, it certainly makes a rifle easier to shoot but I want to keep the weight on this rifle reasonable. For lack of a better way to describe it, consider this rifle a walking varminter.

"full size receiver extension, proper weighted buffer"

I assume proper weighted buffer means not overly light?

Would you mind explaining the receiver extension? That is something totally new to me.

Receiver extension, or RE is the correct term for the buffer tube.

If you use the A2 stock you have one choice for the buffer, a 5.2oz rifle buffer. You could have a custom buffer made of any weight up to 12oz or so. The carbine RE's can choose between 4 weights, from 3oz to 5.6oz. Buffer weight tuning is most often done on carbine length gas system to help with the harsher gas impulse.

If this "walking varminter" is going to be scoped there are other options for the butt stock. PRS with it's adjustable LOP and cheek raiser, comes with a weight penalty. The UBR is lighter, it's adjustable with no cheek raiser. Personally I prefer the UBR over the A2 because of it's adjustable LOP.

If you search some of the long range AR forums you well find a few tricks on upper assembly. They are not necessarily to increase accuracy but to improve repeatability.

Edward429451
October 19, 2012, 12:30 AM
Proper sight picture, breath control, trigger squeeze

I think this is the best answer. First time out with my standard factory Bushy (chrome-lined) I couldn't hit squat with it. I asked the GI's in the next lane at the range to shoot some with it so that I would know if it was me or my rifle/ammo. He proceeded to drill the bulls eye out. Then he showed me a proper mount for that rifle and I immediately began doing a lot better.

A RRA two-stage match trigger added soon thereafter made it oh so easy to get 1.5" at 100 yds with iron sights and my handloads. I know the High Power guys would scoff at this, but it's very combat accurate and will do what needs doing. It all depends on it's intended use as to whether you need to build it into a HP rifle or not. I don't shoot comp., so I'm happy with it as is.

karlb
October 19, 2012, 08:12 AM
A good trigger is the biggest help for me, followed by a free float handguard which I find keeps my groups more consistent.

chadio
October 19, 2012, 01:29 PM
Long sight radius, small rear aperture, small front sight post.

Palmetto-Pride
October 19, 2012, 01:47 PM
The two most important things you can do to a AR to improve accuracy is upgrade the trigger and free float the barrel. Use quality match grade ammo this goes without saying!!

Bamashooter
October 19, 2012, 06:23 PM
My EOTech made a huge difference to me. Ive shot irons in the military and since without ever having a scope on any of my semi auto guns. Till I got my eotech. Sure all the fundamentals and good equipment are key to good accuracy but its alot easier to shoot good with this sight than it is with irons.

Thats made the biggest difference in shooting my AR well based on my experience with my eotech and my AR.

ROGER4314
October 19, 2012, 08:59 PM
Post #2 pretty well nailed it.

I bought a fairly inexpensive Olympic AR with 20" heavy barrel with A2 upper. The rifle had a painted barrel and to top it off, it had a fake suppressor! My plan was to use it only for dry firing offhand practice.

Fast forward some months and it became my favorite 200 yard match rifle! That rifle performed extremely well in countless NRA matches over the next 7 years.

We seem to throw money at marksmanship when a firm possession of the basics, reasonable quality in the rifle, decent ammo and good use of the sling will get the scores!

If your rifle isn't getting the scores that you want, stop spending money and work on YOU! Save your money for lots of ammunition and practice.

Flash

chadio
October 20, 2012, 10:03 AM
I agree with the floating barrel, better trigger and all of the other things mentioned here. In addition to what I said :D

.. however..

the question was:

what are the keys to building a very accurate AR?

not:

how do I shoot an AR more accurately

..ahem..

1) you might consider reading the question before you manipulate the conversation

2) I agree that the software will typically take you further than the hardware

Metal god
October 20, 2012, 10:10 AM
Yep I didn't want to be the first to say it . :D

It would be like someone asking whats the best way to work on my fundamentals , and answering . Well you need a good match barrel and quality ammo :confused: