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View Full Version : Rifleing not the full length of the barrel?


marine6680
September 4, 2012, 08:18 PM
Ok... I seen this on the Czechpoint website.

Barrel length = 16.14 inches
Length of rifling = 9.45 inches

I also seen it mentioned somewhere that the rifling in AR-15s are shorter than the barrel. basically the rifling was only as long as the military barrel, and not the remaining couple inches.

On my old RRA AR I had several years back, as I recall, the rifling was full length of the barrel. I am sure I would have noticed if it was not.

So... whats up with that?

Strafer Gott
September 4, 2012, 08:21 PM
The second number is rate of twist. I'd say that number is good for the standard fodder.

SIGSHR
September 4, 2012, 08:29 PM
I'd say-FWIW-that their "length of rifling" is what we'd call "rate of twist". Only case I ever heard of rifled firearms not being fully rifled for the length of the barrel are the English "Paradox" guns which were meant to fired with both ball catridges and shot, and some cheapo manufacturers of "Saturday Night Specials" in the 19th Century to save a few bucks.

Creeper
September 4, 2012, 08:30 PM
"Length of rifling"
That's an odd terminology... but yeah, like Strafer says, it's the twist rate, as in 1:9.45"... or 1 full groove rotation per every 9.45 inches.

This one really cracks me up. "Group Targets" :D
Effective range - against individual targets up to 655 yds
Effective range - against group targets up to 875 yds

C

marine6680
September 4, 2012, 09:38 PM
Yeah... it through me off how they listed that...

It reminded me about the barrel not fully rifled thing I saw mentioned about 16" AR barrels... Which I thought was odd and probably BS, but I figured I would ask.

Technosavant
September 5, 2012, 09:33 AM
This one really cracks me up. "Group Targets"

Lolz...

It's like they're saying "Well, at that range you might not hit what you're aiming at, but if you have enough targets downrange you're likely to hit something."

GlenF
September 5, 2012, 09:49 AM
I have seen it where with enough "bump firing" the rifling will start to go away. Without looking at the rifling, the first clue of a problem is that bullets will hit the target sideways.

10-96
September 5, 2012, 06:55 PM
It's like they're saying "Well, at that range you might not hit what you're aiming at, but if you have enough targets downrange you're likely to hit something."

That concept has been around at least since WWI. Ever notice the sight graduations on old milsurps? Yup, some of them do go up to 2000 meters or more. CPT (Something) von Schnell (or Schell) was a young German Infantry Lt. in WWI, and went on to teach at Ft. Benning Infantry School. In his book "Combat leadership" which is still required reading in leadership schools, he describes seeing a movement of enemy troops XXXX number of yards away, the Squad Leaders and Platoon Leaders would estimate ranges to which the troops would adjust their sights. Then , they would pour on what I guess would be called "Volley Fire". It still seems to me to be a legitimate harrassment and suppression technique.

Technosavant
September 5, 2012, 07:14 PM
It still seems to me to be a legitimate harrassment and suppression technique.

Oh, I'm sure it would be, but really only if you have a bunch of buddies along to help boost your volume of fire. One guy doing it isn't quite the problem that a full platoon or so would be.

James K
September 6, 2012, 09:05 PM
Looks like some translation problems. Blame it on the Tower of Babel.

Jim