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hargroderauto
August 22, 2012, 09:39 AM
Please explain to me how to Mortar a stuck round in my M&P Sport. I had a jam the first time shooting the new rifle and asked for help on the range. A couple of guys came over and one suggested that "why don't you mortar it?" and the other said because it is not my gun and he did not want to damage it. The M&P has run flawlessly since the then and I want to know how to mortar it if it does jam again.

James K
August 22, 2012, 09:50 AM
I never heard the term in that kind of context. I guess the guru in charge of inventing silly new terms for ordinary things will have to take this on.

Jim

Art Eatman
August 22, 2012, 09:51 AM
Huh. Never heard that term before. How about giving some further explanation as to what you mean by "stuck round"? What got stuck and how/where?

PawPaw
August 22, 2012, 09:51 AM
Yep, never heard that term.

ScottRiqui
August 22, 2012, 09:58 AM
From context, I think it's talking about holding the rifle muzzle-up and striking on the ground, so that the inertia of the BCG will cause it to unstick. I've never heard the term "mortaring" before either, but I have to admit I don't know what the technique is usually called, either.

GI Sandv
August 22, 2012, 10:05 AM
Check out this link:
http://www.mdshooters.com/archive/index.php/t-41164.html

I have a brand new rifle and live rounds kept sticking in the chamber without firing. At one point, two of us were pulling at different ends of the gun trying to pull back the charging handle. I started a thread yesterday, "Stuck Bolt Carrier Group," http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=498958 where I brought up this problem. Someone on there suggested "mortaring the rifle." I haven't tried it yet, but I'm hoping to get out to the range today. I'll let you know if I have any jams and will report on the effectiveness of this method.

hargroderauto
August 22, 2012, 10:12 AM
Scott has it correct, I belive it is slamming the butt of the rifle on the ground to release the BCG. I had a live round jam and could not pull the charging handle back. We eventually got the round out by 1 person pulling on the barrel and another person pulling on the charging handle. Forgive my ignorance, I am new to the AR world. I have slammed the butt on my 870 shotgun on the ground to release a jam before and didn't know if it was OK to do this to the AR or the correct way to do this.

hargroderauto
August 22, 2012, 10:20 AM
Thanks Gi SandV for the link, that explains it perfectly. Damn I love this forum!

wogpotter
August 22, 2012, 10:24 AM
It used to be called "PoGo" you pull back on the charging handle while slapping the butt on a solid surface. It works as well on a solid shooting bench as the ground.

RT
August 22, 2012, 10:25 AM
Make sure you collapse your stock all the way down prior to performing this technique otherwise you may break the stock

Basement-Gunsmith-Z
August 22, 2012, 12:22 PM
The easy way to do this is to get on your knees, lay the stock flat against the floor, make sure the stock is fully retracted, grab the charging handle with one hand, and the forend with the other. Than, lift the rifle up about 1 foot or so and bring it onto the ground with considerable force. The bcg should come right back. I know it seems a bit harsh, but it works, it's what the military has been doing for years. If it has a round chambered point the barrel in a safe direction. Use common sense.

plouffedaddy
August 22, 2012, 05:00 PM
I worked M4 ranges for years---mortar'd a lot of rifles :eek: Perhaps it isn't always the right answer but sometimes it's the only way to expediently get that BCG back and eject the round.

FWIW--we used the term "mortar'd"

UtopiaTexasG19
August 22, 2012, 06:47 PM
My brother, our Vietnam veteran, said the term and tecnique was unofficially adopted during Fire fights when you were being shot at and had no other option. Not a great way to treat a rifle in peace time but a huge necessity under bad circumstances. He also once said that out of necessity, in Vietnam, the preferred weapon for the lead team member on a platoon patrol was a Remingtom pump shotgun loaded with 00 buckshot. Many of his fellow grunts had to write home and have one sent and paid for by their families.

Goatwhiskers
August 22, 2012, 06:52 PM
I see that someone mentioned pulling on the charging handle while another person pulled on the barrel to unstick a live round. :eek: NEVER!! GW

Marquezj16
August 22, 2012, 08:25 PM
When I was a young one, I was shown how to charge my M16 by slamming the butt down on a sandbag. I don't recall it being called mortaring or mortared.