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View Full Version : A little bit of eye candy for you folks


Scorch
July 27, 2012, 03:18 AM
A few jobs I recently completed. Enjoy!

Remington 700 in fiddleback maple, absolutely beautiful piece of wood!
http://i384.photobucket.com/albums/oo282/millardh/Maple7001.jpg

Winchester 1886 Lightweight Rifle XX Fancy American black walnut. That is a really nice piece of wood.
http://i384.photobucket.com/albums/oo282/millardh/18862.jpg

Something a little less classic and a little more fun. Remington 700 single shot in 22-6mm.
http://i384.photobucket.com/albums/oo282/millardh/700-22-6mm1.jpg

And finally, a nice little Winchester Low Wall.
http://i384.photobucket.com/albums/oo282/millardh/BillsLowWall.jpg
Hope you like it!

Nine the Ranger
July 27, 2012, 03:24 AM
I think that last Winchester is my favorite.

Gotta love that classic look.

dos0711
July 27, 2012, 03:48 AM
I'm a lever fan so the 1886 gets my vote! Very nice!

impalacustom
July 27, 2012, 07:05 AM
Is that 86 a takedown? What caliber. What caliber is the 85? Did you do the case hardening and bluing?

Hunter Customs
July 27, 2012, 07:32 AM
Scorch,
I like all of them, beautiful work.
There's nothing like a fine piece of wood to compliment a fine firearm.
Thanks for the pictures.

Best Regards
Bob Hunter

mrawesome22
July 27, 2012, 11:48 AM
The first 700 :thumbup:

Sent from a Linux kernel.

WillyKern69
July 27, 2012, 11:53 AM
Very Nice.

Brian Pfleuger
July 27, 2012, 12:53 PM
Excellent! The bluish green thing isn't my style but it's still a very nice gun. Love the wood in that first one. :drool:

Scorch
July 27, 2012, 01:57 PM
Thanks everyone for the comments.
Is that 86 a takedown? What caliber. What caliber is the 85? Did you do the case hardening and bluing?
The 1886 is indeed a takedown, it is an original Winchester 1886 Lightweight Rifle after all. Caliber was originally .33 WCF, the barrel has been rebored and rechambered to .348 Winchester. The wood was redone similar to Winchester factory design.

The Winchester 1885 Low Wall is a 22LR. I did the wood, John Taylor at Taylor Machine did the metal work, the bluing is done by another shop, the color case hardening is original factory.

flashhole
July 27, 2012, 06:28 PM
Very nice. I've often wondered why we don't see more maple stocks. That top pic is a beauty.

BIG P
July 27, 2012, 08:31 PM
EYE CANDY INDEED,Thanks for sharing,Very nice.

Inspector3711
July 28, 2012, 09:53 AM
Nice work Scorch. Man I just love maple. The wife has a very nice maple 12 string guitar. I can just sit and stare at that thing.

hootey
July 28, 2012, 11:38 AM
Nice, very nice, quality work such as shown here, is very hard find these days. You are a true craftsman....:cool:

bigautomatic
July 29, 2012, 08:28 PM
They are all beautiful, but I'd give my left pinky toe for that low wall. Love it!

G.I.DAVE
July 30, 2012, 03:06 PM
WHOA!

That Winchester is fantastic!

4V50 Gary
July 31, 2012, 05:22 PM
Is that a Winchester A-5 scope on the Winchester?

Scorch
July 31, 2012, 08:28 PM
Is that a Winchester A-5 scope on the Winchester?
I don't know. The customer took the pic after he had put the sights back on the rifle, and he is a better photographer than I am, so I used his picture.

FrankenMauser
August 1, 2012, 12:59 AM
That's a great piece of Maple.

I always talk about putting some good looking Maple on a rifle. But... when I see one, I always think the wood is too light.
Then again... I have been curing a giant chunk of Maple for 3 years, because I can't bring myself to get rid of it. It has a great Fiddleback section at one end, transitioning to straight grain at the other. I lust over wrapping that wood around one of my rifles. ...but I'll never do it. The color is too light.

My grandfather has an absolutely breathtaking piece of Bird's Eye Maple on a Springfield. It is simply amazing. ...but the color is too light for the rifle.

My father somehow snagged a fantastic piece of Fiddleback Maple (with some quilted areas) as a "factory second" a year, or so, ago. It looks amazing. ...but the color is too light for the rifle.


The Low Wall's wood is too dark, but makes me drool.

I have issues...

Scorch
August 1, 2012, 02:31 AM
I always talk about putting some good looking Maple on a rifle. But... when I see one, I always think the wood is too light.
That stock was almost white, about like basswood or tulipwood if you are familiar with those, much too light to see the figure or grain. Once you learn how, it is easy to bring out a little bit of color in a light piece of maple. If I had kept going it would look almost like highly figured walnut, but the customer wanted blond wood so that's what he got. So go ahead, don't be afraid of the light.

fishduck
August 1, 2012, 02:39 PM
The topic EYE Candy was right on target...

maas
August 2, 2012, 05:25 AM
You can't beat winchesters, especially when they're as purty as those!

zukiphile
August 2, 2012, 09:12 AM
Scorch, a question on the 700 stock, if you don't mind.

Where a stock has the grain running vertically, as the one in your picture does, is it less resistant to bending stresses? Is it more likely to break?

infmp32
August 2, 2012, 10:52 AM
Gorgeous looking rifles, Scorch. Well done.

FrankenMauser
August 2, 2012, 12:39 PM
Where a stock has the grain running vertically, as the one in your picture does, is it less resistant to bending stresses? Is it more likely to break?
The grain is actually running the length of the stock, like on any other properly selected stock blank.

But... Fiddleback Maple is called such, due to the wavy lines in the grain. They produce light and dark stripes, due to differences in light reflection.

You might also see it referred to as "Tiger Stripe Maple" or "Curly Maple".

The grain still runs in the normal direction, but the grain structure has unique reflective properties.

Another (expensive) variation of Maple is Quilted Maple (http://www.figuredwoodsales.com/figured_maples/quilted_maple.html), which generally blows everyone's mind when they see it.

Scorch
August 2, 2012, 01:02 PM
Where a stock has the grain running vertically, as the one in your picture does, is it less resistant to bending stresses? Is it more likely to break?
As Frankenmauser pointed out, the grain runs lengthwise (from the butt to the forend). This is typical of rifle stocks and is done for shear strength (the amount of force that would be required to break the stock into two pieces). The figure is wavy grain, a natural characteristic of the wood in high-stress areas of the tree that makes it less likely to break across the grain (actually kind of like corrugated cardboard. Ever try to tear corrugated?). The figure appears when you cut a straight line through the wavy grain. The figure can sometimes cause issues with warping, but typically only if it is uneven from one side of the stock to the other.

Figured woods are often called soundwoods, because their structure makes them vibrate much more consistently and longer than straight grained wood, and these types of wood are often used in musical instruments. Figured wood is somewhat rare, I have read estimates that less than 3% of hardwood lumber exhibits figure, although in maple it is quite common. Typically, the more figure a piece of wood has, the more you pay for it. In addition to fiddleback maple, there is curly, pillow/quilted, and "flame maple" (an extreme combination of wavy, curly, and pillow) that looks like flames (duh).

Class is over.

zukiphile
August 3, 2012, 07:23 AM
Thanks. I may never use any of that, but it is interesting.

impalacustom
August 4, 2012, 03:34 AM
Scorch, what did you use to get the "Winchester red" on the low wall?

Scorch
August 4, 2012, 08:41 PM
Fillet of a fenny snake,
In the caldron boil and bake;
Eye of newt, and toe of frog,
Wool of bat, and tongue of dog,
Adder’s fork, and blind-worm’s sting,
Lizard’s leg, and owlet’s wing,—
For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.

I used to use virgin's blood, but it's not available any more.

OK, not really. I mixed it myself to match an old High Wall I restocked. The Winchester guys seem to like it. The original factory "Winchester Red" is highly variable, ranging from yellowish orange to almost wine color, and the stains available on the market are woefully inadequate. Mine is pretty red with just a touch of orange to it, but since I mix it myself I can make it any shade you like.

FloridaVeteran
August 4, 2012, 10:27 PM
Sure wish I had the kind of talent that Scorch does. I suppose a fair bit can be learned, but a person must also have a whole lot of natural talent, to use the "learned" part well enough to make stocks that look so good.

zippy13
August 4, 2012, 11:36 PM
I used to use virgin's blood, but it's not available any more.
ROFLMAO :D

Nice work, Scorch.

Winchester_73
August 4, 2012, 11:42 PM
Scorch

Wondering what type / brand scope that is on the low wall? Fecker Lyman Unertl? What power? I like the vintage scopes.

Thats some good restoration work. Although I don't like the concept of a restoration, some people do it better than others and you all do good work.

Scorch
August 5, 2012, 01:09 AM
Wondering what type / brand scope that is on the low wall? Fecker Lyman Unertl? What power? I like the vintage scopes.
Someone else asked a similar question. I don't know, the customer mounted the sights and took the photo after I had already returned the rifle to him. I used the photo because it is better than the ones I take.
Although I don't like the concept of a restoration, some people do it better than others and you all do good work.
Well, don't fret about it too much. It was a basket case gun, came to us as a bunch of parts in a box, many missing or damaged. I made the stock to match photos of original Low Walls. John Taylor at Taylor Machine, a true craftsman and a real gunsmith, rebuilt the action and made several parts from scratch to the original pattern. Some of his work is so good that serious collectors have him make parts for old guns and claim they cannot tell them from originals.

Winchester_73
August 5, 2012, 01:47 PM
Well, don't fret about it too much. It was a basket case gun, came to us as a bunch of parts in a box, many missing or damaged. I made the stock to match photos of original Low Walls. John Taylor at Taylor Machine, a true craftsman and a real gunsmith, rebuilt the action and made several parts from scratch to the original pattern. Some of his work is so good that serious collectors have him make parts for old guns and claim they cannot tell them from originals.

Oh so it was brought back from the grave? Thats really cool. Given new life. I was referring to how some people take an older gun, say 80% with worn wood and pay to have it restored. Usually one can tell that they had that work done anyways. I'd rather have the gun with character, but in this case, completed rebuilding a parts gun is pretty neat. A new beginning...

FloridaVeteran
August 5, 2012, 11:13 PM
I am grateful that Scorch, who is gifted with a rare talent and shares his knowledge freely and graciously, posts here and educates the other "98%" of us.

I sent him a question, offline, that I was too embarrassed to ask online and he promptly gave me a great solution in an easy-to-understand manner. I am pleased to be able to thank him publicly, here.

Wish I had found this forum years ago. And thanks again, Scorch.