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redma3
July 19, 2012, 06:57 PM
I have a spanish m1916 win 308 . Can any one tell me for sure shooting modern 308 rounds is bad idea. I've read a lot of do and donts about it... I read one persons comment about it hurting bolt and it not cycling rite. Mine has a slite catch to it.. Any info would be greatly appretiated

Mr. Whimsy
July 19, 2012, 10:25 PM
I have one and haven't shot it much, so I am not the greatest authority and hopefully someone else will chime in.

But... I've concluded - and this is for myself mind you, YMMV - that the 1916 can handle normal .308 ammo. I've read about this on and off for years but I've never seen even one actual account of anyone damaging his rifle from doing it.

It's Internet fear-mongering at its finest.

It's been a while since I looked at this so hopefully someone will come in here with pics of his blown-up Mauser.

gyvel
July 19, 2012, 10:50 PM
I think the general gist of the matter is that those guns were originally intended for a round that produced about 40-42000 psi or so, and NOT the .308 which is in excess of 50-52000 psi. As I understand it (in other words, "I heard") that the Spanish loading for the 7.62 round was considerably lower than the NATO standard due to the CETME rifles not being able to withstand a steady diet of NATO 7.62.

While I doubt that one of them would actually "blow up," I am of the opinion that excess headspace will develop within a relatively short period of time due to the receivers stretching because of the more or less softer metal used in their construction.

Those Mausers were generally intended to be second line weapons, issued to rear echelon personnel such as police, etc., who would NOT put a lot of rounds through them during the life of the weapon.

YMMV

Mr. Whimsy
July 20, 2012, 01:09 PM
I am not arguing with you, but will add that I tried to to drill my receiver for scope mounting. Tried. That thing is pretty tough. Come to think of it I've never heard of any "weak" Mauser steel outside of the 1916.

I don't really know what caliber this gun started out as or the pressures it was rated for.

Best solution of all is to just download your .308's and shoot that. If no problems arise, increase incrementally. That is my plan when and if I ever get this thing scoped. It's been sitting around here for 20 years waiting for that day.

emcon5
July 20, 2012, 01:38 PM
I don't really know what caliber this gun started out as or the pressures it was rated for.

1916s are shortened version of the 1893 small ring actions, designed for 7mm Mauser.

7mm Mauser Maximum pressure 56,565 psi (SAAMI spec is lower than this)
7.62×51mm NATO Maximum pressure 60,200 psi
308 Winchester Maximum pressure 62,000 psi

Personally, I wouldn't fire commercial .308. I would handload down.

PetahW
July 20, 2012, 02:25 PM
I have a spanish m1916 win 308 . Can any one tell me for sure shooting modern 308 rounds is bad idea.


It's a bad idea, for sure. :cool: . :D

.

Scorch
July 20, 2012, 03:11 PM
While these rifles may be marketed and sold as 308, but they were indeed chambered for 7.62X51 NATO, and its lower pressures. They were intended as reserve weapons and not as first-line weapons, and as such the concern for their strength and viability in high-volume shooting was not a consideration.

BTW, few if any of these rifles are 100+ years old as is often heard, most of the older rifles were scrapped after the Spanish Civil War, so the dates typically seen on these rifles is from the 1930s on.

I have had several 1916s over the years, 7X57 and never 7.62X51, and fired 7X57 military ammo in them with no negative effects. I have also heard of some that were so soft that they would be unsafe with even 7X57 ammo. If you feel a need for a M1916 as a cheap shooter, definitely be nice to it.

Mobuck
July 20, 2012, 10:21 PM
I have 4 of these 1916 modified Mausers. One is still in the 7.62x51 chambering but 2 others have been rebarrelled. Since I can load any pressure level I wish, I keep the 7.62 at 300 Savage performance levels. Another of these is short chambered in 243Win and will never be fired with factory ammo since the bolt won't close on a standard 243 case.
I still have one in 7x57 and an action waiting to be barrelled to 6.5x55.
Be advised that the modification process involved cutting back the front receiver ring so not only is there a strength issue, there is also the issue of one less thread than a true 1893 Mauser. There are reports of the locking lug recesses being set back resulting in extreme hard bolt lift even with moderate pressures. The softer action will deform rather than grenade if over stressed(probably).

gyvel
July 22, 2012, 09:10 AM
The softer action will deform rather than grenade if over stressed(probably).

Exactly. Setback will occur with the resultant excess headspace. This will generally result in a case head separation or similar, rather than the action "blowing up."

I've not heard of any of the .308 Mausers "blowing up," or any Carcano either, for that matter, despite what misinformation was promulgated by gun writers.

Mr. Whimsy
July 22, 2012, 05:06 PM
There are some tremendously knowledgeable fellows here.

After reading this, I will refrain from loading mine higher than .300 Savage velocities. Honestly that is enough .30 rifle for me anyway, so it's no sacrifice.

gyvel
July 23, 2012, 08:44 AM
After reading this, I will refrain from loading mine higher than .300 Savage velocities. Honestly that is enough .30 rifle for me anyway, so it's no sacrifice.

Actually, a '93 or '95 action would be the perfect candidate for a rebarrel to .300 Savage. I alwyas did like that cartridge, and I am fortunate to have a Savage 99 and Remington 81 chambered for it.

jackpine
July 24, 2012, 10:58 PM
no matter what it says on the rifle it is chambered in 7.62 nato and 7.62X51 nato is lower pressure than 308 winchester. Stick to surplus 7.62X51, low recoil 308 win or hand loads.

emcon5
July 25, 2012, 09:00 AM
7.62X51 nato is lower pressure than 308 winchester.

Right, but as I mentioned above, it is still ~7% higher pressure than the round the action was designed for.