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rebs
July 9, 2012, 05:43 PM
What is the reputation of this rifle, is it a good one or not ? What are the pro's and con's ?

PetahW
July 9, 2012, 06:42 PM
The rep is excellent, since it's most likely taken more game than most other CF rifle put together.

Pros: Usually light, handy, and sufficiently accurate withing the range it was designed for.

Cons: It's most likely unable to strike Elephants DRT @ 500 yards.

.

Pahoo
July 9, 2012, 06:50 PM
What is the reputation of this rifle, is it a good one or not ? What are the pro's and con's ?
Too many pro's and yes, there are a few cons. On the plus side, I would ventrure a opinion that it has taken more whitetails than any other rifle. . ;)

Be Safe !!!

gwnorth
July 10, 2012, 05:51 AM
7 Million owners can't be all wrong! The 1894 had sold over 7 Million units before Winchester shut down as its own manufacturer. The clones out now bearing the name are made by Miroku in Japan (a 100+ year old firearms company, and who also make Browning Citori shotguns as well as selling in Europe under their own brand). Miroku makes a very well made gun, IMO, some say better then Winchester was producing in the final decade or so of it's production.

The new ones do have a hammer block safety (tang mounted) and use a rebounding hammer - purists do not like that, but on my 1892s it works fine without problems. Older USA made 1894s are not hard to find though - I see several in my local gun shops every time I am in there.

gun nut
July 10, 2012, 09:25 AM
Good reputation, great resale value!:cool:

batmann
July 10, 2012, 04:28 PM
Speaking as an owner, they are great rifles, light, handy, cheap ammo that allows you to shoot a lot and pretty reliable. They may be one of the top sporting rifles ever. That said, they do have some limitations such as range, I try to keep my shots under 200 yards, bullet type (round bullets) and power. If you are looking for 300-400 yard shots or dropping a bull Elk at over 200 yards or so, you may need to think about something higher on power food chain.

rebs
July 10, 2012, 09:03 PM
Thank you for the replies

Smokey Joe
July 11, 2012, 11:14 AM
Rebs--What is it you contemplate doing with this rifle if/when you get it? That would figure heavily in my recommendation as to buy/don't buy a Win 94.

If you're thinking about general-use hunting lever action rifles, consider the Savage Model 99 as well. Rotary magazine means you can use pointed bullets, for one advantage over the Win 94.

dos0711
July 11, 2012, 12:57 PM
Hornady Leverevolution solved the magazine issue with tube magazines.

gak
July 11, 2012, 11:01 PM
Nothing like 'em. Like a lot of folks, my preference is for the vaunted Pre 64 models. Early Post 64s lost a lot of the mojo with cost (and hence apparent quality) cutting measures. A second choice would be ca 1978-81 or so--just prior to the changeover of ownership to USRAC, when Winchester seemed to have regained a lot of the quality. Third (or first if you intend to scope) would be an '80s pre-safety angle-eject (AE) model, the AE part allowing more traditional receiver mounted scopes. Fourth would be a later model with the tang safety if that "feature" does not bother. The 90s-era crossbolt safety didn't win a lot of fans. A lot of especially old-timers, myself included, find these lawyer- induced add-ons (especially the rebounding hammer that accompanies) to be unnecessary and even potentially intrusive or hindering, the original half-cock being sufficient--but do have the functional advantage if unloading (ejecting live) rounds especially quickly, with greater safety-confidence.

The Win's typically slimmer profile and prolific and storied history (its 1892, 86, 76, 73 and 66 predecessors) are its main "visceral" calling cards. You'll find after researching and handling these that shooters tend to be either a Winchester fan or more oriented to its chief competitor, the Marlin--the latter winning a lot of folks over for its more scope- friendly design. I tend toward not burdening the handy, light configuration (the gun's main advantages to me) of the 94 with scopes, and just keeping shots within open/iron sights ranges,..thus a perfect marriage with the .30-30.cartridge. However, older Marlins are excellent too and 336s are fine guns of this same genre and a good choice also if scoping is paramount to you. The previously mentioned "flex tip" Hornady Leverlution ammo has placed the .30-30's capabilities "more" in scope-required ranges. We're not talking an additional 100 or more yards (get a bolt-action if you need that), but more like a claimed 50-75 yard range advantage over "conventional" ammo.

bamaranger
July 12, 2012, 11:42 AM
The M94's prime virtue, at least in the later common 20" carbine versions, was that it was light and handy, and provided a sufficiently powerful ctg for deer and black bear, the 30-30. At its intro the 30-30 was the first smokeless sporting ctg. Deer were still hunted afoot primarily, especially in the east and south, and the modest ranges and sometimes thick and steep terrain were suited to the rifle and the 30 ctg.

But the bolt rifle and more powerful cartridges, and scope sights were gaining popularity with hunters and the carbine could not keep up. Drive and stalk hunting became less common, and now I seldom if ever see a M94 in the field. The Marlin holds on, barely, as they could be easly scoped and were offered more affordably for a period of time before the current "budget bolt rifles" hit the market.

Pros As stated light and handy, and with 7 million sold, ammo will be widely available for a long, long time. But, the Leverlution stuff is an answer to a question nobody asked. The .30-30 ctg will take deer, black bear handily, and has taken bigger game certainly. Heck, a 30-30 lever might even be a viable SD/PDW. The action, though not simple or accessable, is surprisingly rugged and reliable. The ctg has about 200 yd reach, but if truthful, few of us kill whitetails that far, and hitting with iron sights at that range, in field settings is not easy for most of us.

Cons. The rifle is not easily stripped, and must be cleaned from the muzzle. The traditional half cock safey requires the correct understanding and application, hence the birth of the safety equipped, lawyered up lever rifles, to me an abomination. The early versions are not easily scoped, so one must have young eyes to manage the bead and blade sights. A good answer is a peep sight, but nobody hunts peeps much anymore. MOderate power, sufficient for most of us, but if you are in elk, moose and big bear country, there are better answers.

I've owned and hunted several, and killed a handful of deer with them, but always ended up trading them away for something else. Now, they are out of production, essentially, and prices are climbing.

jmr40
July 12, 2012, 02:44 PM
What is the reputation of this rifle, is it a good one or not ?

Depends on when it was made. There is nothing wrong with the design, but over the years quality has been all over the map. Some are well made and shoot great. Others are nothing but trouble.

Generally the rifles made prior to the 70's are the best. Winchester made some quality cuts in 1964 on all models, but the 94's didn't suffer as much right away. There was an effort to improve quality during the 80's, but by the 1990's- 2006 when Winchester closed quality was spotty. Some good guns, some bad.

I like the Winchesters well enough, but if I were looking to buy a used lever action in 30-30 I'd prefer the Marlin. If you get a good Winchester it is every bit as good as the Marlin, but the odds of getting a good Marlin are much better. It is very rare to get a bad one. Their quality has been very consistent over the years, up until very recently when they were bought out by Remington.

PawPaw
July 12, 2012, 03:52 PM
What Jmr40 says is a fair assessment. I've got two Win94s and I enjoy shooting them. One made in '65, the other in '83. I've also got a '74 Marlin and it's a very nice rifle. If I wanted to scope a rifle, the Marlin would be the hands-down choice, although I admit that I have toyed with the idea of scout-scoping the '83 Winchester.

Baba Louie
July 13, 2012, 06:06 AM
An American Icon in terms of lever action hunting rifles, designed by John M. Browning along with its younger but bigger brother the 1895.

The .30 WCF (later called the .30-30) was one of the 1st smokeless powder rounds developed for commercial use and the cartridge will be your limiting factor due to the inherent ballistics. The tubular magazine prevents certain bullet designs for obvious reasons (no spitzer pointed rounds allowed, but as others have pointed out, the new Leverevolution rounds have changed that). You can pretty much find .30-30 ammo most anywhere that sells ammunition at pretty good prices. Or you can reload and shoot spire tips if you only place one in the magazine at a time. (WARNING! NOT, I repeat, not recommended unless you really know your limitations)

From old 26" octagonal barrels down to 16" Trappers, top eject, angle eject, saddle ring, different buttstock configurations, no locks, cross bolt locks, tang mounted locks, full length or cut down magazines, straight wrist/curved wrist & lever, cost savings (value engineering) over the years kept it alive and well and killing deer, bears, what have you. They even made them for Sears under the Ted Williams brand. I believe Miroku of Japan has made some as of late (tho it may be the model 92 I am thinking of here). A few years back Olin shut down the mfg line. Prices went crazy, even tho there are a few million in existance, everyone thought they now had an expensive collector piece (maybe they do... dunno). Commerative models abound as well.

In the days of horseback travel, as it fit into a scabbard with ease, it was your basic "truck gun". Still fills that role today for some. ;)

An Icon.

Why do you ask? :D

dahermit
July 13, 2012, 07:02 AM
The older ones are better than the new angle eject ones. My old ones cycled very smoothly. The newer ones had a full-of-sand gritty feel.
The thirty-thirty was all that was needed, and still is for whitetails.

dos0711
July 13, 2012, 08:03 AM
I picked up one at the local gun show earlier this year for $275 and that included half a box of ammo. I'm glad I own one that says it's made in New Haven and not out of the country...personal preference.:D

gaseousclay
July 13, 2012, 10:24 AM
The older ones are better than the new angle eject ones. My old ones cycled very smoothly. The newer ones had a full-of-sand gritty feel.

if you're referring to the pre-64's then I would agree, but the post 64's from 1965 to roughly 1981 are technically inferior to the later angle eject models. the angle eject models went back to using 100% steel forgings for their barrels and receivers, while the earlier post 64's used a mystery metal, which is why you'll frequently see rifles of this era with a lot of pitting/rusting

Big Shrek
July 13, 2012, 11:58 AM
Best thing you can do with a Winnie is put a Tang Peep or Creedmore Peep on it.

Scopes won't go...or are a total PITA/expensive to get mounted...top-eject kinda makes it difficult...

That's why Marlin ate 'em alive from the 50's until the Remington Buyout...you could just slap a scope right on a Marlin...
after 1955 they pre-drilled 'em for that purpose...

OJ
July 14, 2012, 10:33 AM
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y25/kmastf/RIFLES/IMG_2491.jpg

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y25/kmastf/RIFLES/BUFFALOBILL94A.jpg

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y25/kmastf/RIFLES/003.jpg

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y25/kmastf/RIFLES/AWINCHESTER942.jpg

What can I say - every rifleman should own at least one ;)

You want elephants? Big brother 95 in .405 shoudl do it - and pointy bullets are OK -

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y25/kmastf/RIFLES/AWINCHESTER95-1.jpg

Hawg
July 14, 2012, 12:51 PM
Personally I wouldn't waste good money on an angle eject but then I wouldn't put a scope on a lever action anyway. The receivers on 70's guns were iron plated making touch up or cold bluing a no go situation.

OJ
July 14, 2012, 12:56 PM
Hawg Haggen Personally I wouldn't waste good money on an angle eject but then I wouldn't put a scope on a lever action anyway. The receivers on 70's guns were iron plated making touch up or cold bluing a no go situation.


Scopes on my leverguns never have looked right to me either - that's why I mounted Williams FP rear sight aperture signts on mine - and remove the aperture making it a ghost ring sight - the only one that needed D/T was the 95 -

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y25/kmastf/RIFLES/IMG_1494_edited-1.jpg

Hawg
July 14, 2012, 04:54 PM
Right now I'm doing good with full buckhorns. I may have to go to rear mounts or tang sights but I'll put it off as long as possible.

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y269/rebel727/CAS/buckhorn.jpg

Peter M. Eick
July 15, 2012, 08:04 AM
The pros are that there are about 7 million of them out there. They can't be THAT bad if 7 million other folks bought them.

The cons are that it takes a bit of skill to shoot with one and hunt with it. First off the sights are irons and today's shooters/hunters seem to constantly push optics. I admit it, I have optics on my bolts also but I shoot peeps and opens on my levers. Just easier to sight and carry.

The other con today is that the 30/30 94 is not a 400 yard "bean field" rifle. It will not give you bragging groups of under 0.1" at 100 yrds off the bench. It is not the gun to shoot across canyons for that spectacular 800 yrds one shot elk hit. But if you are a hunter and can work your way up to say under 150 yrds or preferably under 75 yrds, then it is a great handy rifle that is very easy to carry, adequate power for the job and easy to crawl through the brush with.

While I hate to come off as a luddite, I feel that in my lifetime hunters have morphed to shooters/snipers that seem to pride themselves on longer shots with bigger and bigger guns. When i started hunting, my upbringing stressed skill and stealth to reduce the distance to the target to where the 30/30 was a reasonable choice. Maybe that is because it is what we had and we realized the limits or maybe it was just a different time and skill in the forest was valued more than today. I am not sure, it was a long time ago.

Long story short, while I own a Sendero rifle (25/06) and I own bolts, by choice I hunt with a 30/30 94 with a peep unless the circumstances preclude it. For example, sendero feeder hunting common here in texas works against a 30/30 in many cases.

Jack O'Conner
July 15, 2012, 04:25 PM
The 94 Winchester stood the test of time being produced for more than 100 years. Its American "death" was caused largely by failure of Management vs Organized Labor to negotiate a critical contract.

The 94 can take a lot of neglect and abuse yet still deliver bullets right on target every time.

Although the 30-30 is considered a deer cartridge, I've found it to be quite lethal on larger animals as well. I'm certain that 30-30 carbines will continue to be popular for several decades yet to come.

Jack

http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c146/rushmoreman/DSC01167.jpg

wyop
July 15, 2012, 07:32 PM
Pro: Durable, reliable. Pre-64 instances are collectable, some rifle (vs. carbine) models very much so. Post-1964 changes to cheapen the rifle were not well received at first. The carbine variants are handy, quick rifles which worked to take snap-shots on game up to elk (if at close range). Had a very flat side profile, which made it work well as a rifle in a scabbard on horseback or behind the seat of a pickup.

Cons: Tricky to completely strip for cleaning. Accuracy was only OK compared to bolt guns. Post-1964 models aren't anywhere nearly as sought after. Has the same cons as other tube magazine center-fire rifles - no pointed bullets. The modern safety additions to the 94 are an abomination. Pre-64 variants should be studied closely as there are several large changes from 1894 to 1964 in things like the metal composition of the receiver, the type of metal finish used at the factory, heat treatment of receivers, etc.

There were about 2.6 million examples produced prior to the 1964 change-over, and 7 million post-64 produced.

Hawg
July 16, 2012, 02:34 PM
While I hate to come off as a luddite, I feel that in my lifetime hunters have morphed to shooters/snipers that seem to pride themselves on longer shots with bigger and bigger guns. When i started hunting, my upbringing stressed skill and stealth to reduce the distance to the target to where the 30/30 was a reasonable choice. Maybe that is because it is what we had and we realized the limits or maybe it was just a different time and skill in the forest was valued more than today. I am not sure, it was a long time ago.

I was just the opposite. I grew up hunting across bean fields where if you couldn't make a 300 yard shot you best stay home. Getting close was out of the question. I had a 94 30-30 as a teen but it was just a back yard plinker. I moved away from there about 12 years ago and had to learn how to woods hunt because I'd only ever done it a few times growing up. Now my trusty old scoped 30-06 hardly ever gets used and my 30-30 has most favored status next to my .54 Hawken.