PDA

View Full Version : does anyone make AR-180s anymore?


jason41987
July 5, 2012, 12:22 AM
hey everyone.. ive been trying to find someone that manufactures the AR-18/AR-180, and i cant seem to find them anywhere, i really like the design though and would love to have a new one... does anyone know of anyone producing these?

5.56RifleGuy
July 5, 2012, 12:36 AM
No, not right now.

Armalite made the 180 B about 10 years ago, but stopped making them.

5.56RifleGuy
July 5, 2012, 12:37 AM
You can get an unfired one on gunbroker for $1500 to $2000.

jason41987
July 5, 2012, 05:07 AM
its a shame, i really liked the AR-18, i just wish someone made new ones

gunloony
July 5, 2012, 07:30 AM
I sold one of mine a few months ago, holding on to another for the moment as my only large-magazine rifle.

The 18/180 just came along a few years too late. If it had been available at the same time, it might well have been adopted by the US military instead of the AR-15. The design is superior in some ways, the gas piston system being a major example.

Jo6pak
July 5, 2012, 05:26 PM
Sadly, No:(

A buddy has an old Sterling built AR180. It's truely one of the most under-rated rifles. Loved that little rifle

jason41987
July 7, 2012, 01:26 PM
what about the vulcan arms V18 rifle?... it appears to be a full on AR180 upper mounted to a custom receiver designed to give the AR180 the benefit of using some of the AR15 aftermarket as far as grips, and trigger groups go while having a standard STANAG magwell... could this possibly be a good modern alternative to an AR180?

Slamfire
July 7, 2012, 05:37 PM
I handled the 2000's Armalite AR180's in their pavilion on Commercial Row at Camp Perry.

It is my recollection that something major, like the lower, was a plastic casting. It really appeared and felt cheap.

I did get to handle an original AR180 (or AR18?) years ago. I was impressed overall with the layout and features of the rifle and it did not seem cheap or shoddy in the slightest.

Crosshair
July 7, 2012, 10:11 PM
It is my recollection that something major, like the lower, was a plastic casting. It really appeared and felt cheap.
The lower tended to break at the front hinge pin as it was unreinforced. Had they stuck to a metal lower I would have bought one back then.

5.56RifleGuy
July 7, 2012, 10:16 PM
This is kind of an aside, but the one I got recently smells like vanilla.

James K
July 7, 2012, 11:03 PM
I have a Howa and it is a very well made gun. Except for the weak hinge system at the folding buttstock, I consider the gun better than the AR-15. It was designed to be made on simpler machinery than the AR-15, at a cost of 1/4 or 1/3 that of the AR-15. It could have also been made in other countries for use there at even lower cost.

It would, in theory at least, have been less prone to trouble caused by dirt or sand since the bolt rides on rods and has a lot of clearance, unlike the AR-15. Too bad that by the time it was developed, the U.S. was committed to the AR-15/M16, as the AR-18 could (IMHO) have given the earlier rifle a run for its money.

Jim

jason41987
July 8, 2012, 04:16 AM
hmm, wonder what a metal lower AR180 costs used, might be worth buying one to study further

Jo6pak
July 8, 2012, 08:20 AM
The later production AR-180B models did have reinforcement front hinge pin, which solved the weakness.

ssilicon
July 8, 2012, 09:22 AM
deleted

Crosshair
July 9, 2012, 01:22 PM
The later production AR-180B models did have reinforcement front hinge pin, which solved the weakness.
Any way to tell which is which in case I run across an example?

Jo6pak
July 9, 2012, 06:19 PM
I don't recall if it's easily visible without disassembly. Most of my experience is with the older all steel "pre-B" models.

I would think it should be visible upon dissassembly,.

Armalite did issue an order to replace any early B model lowers about 4 years ago. Not sure if they are still honoring it. Maybe contact them and ask?