PDA

View Full Version : Corrosive ammo database?


Jo6pak
June 6, 2012, 08:32 PM
I have several dozen boxes of different surplus ammunition that I have aquired over the years for my old military rifles, ranging from 30-06, 6.5mm Swedish, 8mm Mauser, 7.62x54, and 7.62NATO.

While I am nearly positive that all the 7.62NATO is non-corrosive, I'm not which of the others are corrosive. I have no problems shooting corrosive ammo, I just want to know which cleaning technique to use with the different ammo.

Is there a database somewhere or a good way to find out what is and what is not corrosive?

Tidewater_Kid
June 6, 2012, 09:55 PM
This is a place to start. I knew of another site, but it seems to be gone now...

http://cartridgecollectors.org/?page=headstampcodes

TK

troopcom
June 6, 2012, 10:07 PM
While I am nearly positive that all the 7.62NATO is non-corrosive, I'm not which of the others are corrosive. I have no problems shooting corrosive ammo, I just want to know which cleaning technique to use with the different ammo.

I think its safe to say that all American Milsurp ammo is non-corrosive and all Foreign made Milsurp is corrosive.
That's my opinion. I would treat all foreign ammo as corrosive even though I think all foreign 30-06 and 7.62x51 are non-corrosive.

gyvel
June 6, 2012, 10:38 PM
French .30 carbine is corrosive, and I would bet that French .30-06 is also corrosive.

raftman
June 6, 2012, 11:02 PM
It may seem like a less than ideal answer, but I treat all surplus ammo as corrosive.

Jim Watson
June 6, 2012, 11:13 PM
I think its safe to say that all American Milsurp ammo is non-corrosive

It is not.
There is still chlorate primed USGI .30-06 and .45 ACP from WWII and Korea available here and there. Fortunately, the US Army kept good records and the time and even the lot number of the changeover is available.
http://forums.thecmp.org/showthread.php?t=5821

I would play it safe and wet clean all the foreign stuff.
I bought a .223 once. It was dirty but apparently sound and the price was right. I later found that it had probably been left dirty to conceal a dark bore. So SOMEBODY made corrosive 5.56. A new barrel kind of wiped out the good deal.

jsmaye
June 7, 2012, 09:10 AM
Simple - when in doubt, clean as though it was corrosive. Just add a wet swabbing to the normal cleaning process.

troopcom
June 7, 2012, 04:10 PM
It is true to just play it safe. What is the best way to clean after firing corrosive ammo? I have heard everything from soapy water to Windex with ammonia. If it is salt then it should dissolve with hot water. What do you guys suggest?

F. Guffey
June 7, 2012, 04:41 PM
http://www.odcmp.org/1101/USGI.pdf

F. Guffey

Jo6pak
June 7, 2012, 05:41 PM
Thanks guys, those sites are a great resource.

I've always just assumed that the 8mm Mauser and 7.62x54 is corrosive, and cleaned accordingly.

The "when in doubt" advice is good, I think I'll go with that from now on.

jsmaye
June 8, 2012, 08:24 AM
If it is salt then it should dissolve with hot water. What do you guys suggest?

Hot water.

Everything else is overkill, or someone's pet potion.

However, you'll still need solvents to remove powder and carbon fouling, and to remove copper and lead deposits.

44 AMP
June 8, 2012, 01:19 PM
I think its safe to say that all American Milsurp ammo is non-corrosive

Its safe to say all American Milsurp from the early 50's on up is non-corrosive.

The .30 carbine ammo was always non corrosive, but .30-06 and .45ACP from WWII and earlier CAN BE CORROSIVE!

The complete switch to non-corrosive primers was done sometime in the early 1950s. As far as I know, all US 7.62 NATO is non-corrosive. Not so with foreign made ammo. I think some of it is still corrosive primed, even today.


If you want to test, pull a bullet, dump the powder, and fire the primer with a putty knife (or other steel target) right in front of the muzzle. Clean your bore with hot water, followed by normal cleaning. (in case it is corrosive)

Wait a couple days or so. If it was a corrosive primer, you will see rust on the putty knife blade.

Jo6pak
June 8, 2012, 05:13 PM
Great test 44 AMP.

My next question was going to be, "Is there an easy way to identifiy if a cartridge has a corrosive primer."
Maybe I'll go pick up a bullet puller and check some of the old stuff I have laying around.

Anyone know off hand if Privi Partisan ammo is corrosive? It's about all I can find anymore for "cheaper" plinking 6.5 Swede ammo.

Scimmia
June 8, 2012, 05:27 PM
Anyone know off hand if Privi Partisan ammo is corrosive? It's about all I can find anymore for "cheaper" plinking 6.5 Swede ammo.

Modern Prvi Partisan is not corrosive. If you're talking about old surplus ammo made at the Prvi Partisan factory, you'll probably have to be more specific.

Jo6pak
June 8, 2012, 08:09 PM
Yes, I'm speaking to the modern Prvi, thanks

tobnpr
June 9, 2012, 01:03 PM
None of the Swiss or Swede calibers ever used corrosive primers... evidenced by the usually pristine bores on all their milsurps.

How I hate throwing away that GP-11 brass, if it weren't for the Berdan primers....dammit...

Mike Irwin
June 9, 2012, 01:11 PM
"Its safe to say all American Milsurp from the early 50's on up is non-corrosive."

Uhm... no, not 100%.

Through the 1950s and into the 1960s some batches of military (primarly Lake City) match ammunition was loaded not only with corrosive primers, but also mercuric primers, as well.

These are identified only on the box, and by the match headstamp on the case. But, apparently not all match ammo was so loaded.

The boxes were clearly marked that the primers were both corrosive and mercuric, and that the cases should not be reloaded and the gun cleaned properly after firing.