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EvilGenius
June 3, 2012, 06:55 PM
I've been watching men's & women's world cup skeet & trap finals on the issf channel on youtube the last few weeks and I've noticed that all the shooters are using high brass target loads and I'm curious why.

More powder means higher fps so less lead (lead as in leading the target) necessary?

Maybe the ISSF requires non-toxic loads so theyre shooting fast steel shot?

What other possible reasons are there?

CK_32
June 3, 2012, 07:02 PM
Link I that channel. Interested

zippy13
June 3, 2012, 07:31 PM
Perhaps they are shooting Federal Gold Medal (or other) paper hulls. Their brass is a higher than plastic hulls.

EvilGenius
June 3, 2012, 07:49 PM
Link I that channel. Interested

Here's the link to their channel.

http://www.youtube.com/user/issfchannel?feature=g-user-u

I find most of the sports on there boring though interesting. But I do like the clay sports (skip the "highlights"/"interview" vids and go straight for the "finals" ones.) It's a lot like baseball or golf (if you're into that). I can have it on in the background while I do other stuff.

Perhaps they are shooting Federal Gold Medal (or other) paper hulls. Their brass is a higher than plastic hulls.

Could be, they don't mention it much but it's usually Italian, French or some other foreign brand I haven't heard of.

Virginian-in-LA
June 3, 2012, 08:06 PM
All regulated shooting sports have limits on shot size, shot quantities/weight, and shot speed. And they do random checks. You cannot look at a loaded shell and tell anything.

oneounceload
June 3, 2012, 08:14 PM
They are most likely shooting one of the Euro loads and the use high brass - why? it makes NO difference or sense - Kemen, B&P, and a few others use a higher base brass than US makers, but the loads are governed by rules as to payloads and speed, so brass size doesn't matter

TheKlawMan
June 3, 2012, 09:47 PM
Higer brass equals more brass equals a purtier shell!:D

zippy13
June 3, 2012, 10:03 PM
At bit of trivia:
Before plastic shells (and the EPA), shotgun tournaments would often have a evening bonfire where the paper hulls and the empty target boxes would be ceremonially set ablaze. It often heralded the opening of the bar.