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tchunter
April 14, 2012, 10:24 AM
I was in the yard yesterday with my dogs when some movement caught my eye. I was sitting off to the side while the dogs were running around when I caught the movement, it was a coyote sneaking through the fence row. I didn't want the dogs to chase it so I called them to me. As the dogs ran to me the coyote came out into the open following them across the yard. Luckily I held their attention long enough to get them inside and grab a rifle. When I came out the coyote was gone. What's up with that?

gyvel
April 14, 2012, 10:50 AM
Maybe the coyote thought you were calling it, too.:D

buck460XVR
April 14, 2012, 10:59 AM
Coyotes around here have hungry pups right now. House pets(depending on size) can be easy prey. Generally 'yotes are extremely wary of humans and your obvious presence(calling the dogs) combined with the 'yote's lack of fear may mean the 'yote has more problems than just hungry pups.

m.p.driver
April 14, 2012, 11:15 AM
Been having a problem with them for several years now in Ohio.They started taking neighborhood pets so we eradicate them when we get a chance.

Mobuck
April 14, 2012, 11:39 AM
If discretion allows, carry the rifle constantly until you get another chance. Once the coyote has decided an easy meal is close, it will return.
During winter and spring, I carry a rifle anytime I'm outside and keep a rifle in the pickup, tractor, and barn in case I failed to carry one.

tchunter
April 14, 2012, 01:16 PM
I agree that there might be something wrong with the coyote. There are so many around here they wake us up at night when they are all yipping and howling. I have a rifle in position now for the next round. I'm guessing they won't be real happy with my 25-06!

Irish B
April 14, 2012, 01:37 PM
That's why I have big dogs!! A German Shepard and a Husky/wolf. It is not unusual for a coyote to stalk dogs just purely out of curiosity. Also it's not uncommon for a pack to use a female to lure dogs away so that the pack can attack

shortwave
April 14, 2012, 01:38 PM
Yotes got ahold of neighbors dog in broad daylight a couple-three weeks ago. Full grown, big, male lab. Dog was in yard between house and barn. Dog lived but needed a trip to the vet to get sewn up.

Whether or not there was something wrong with the yote(sick wise) stalking your dog is questionable. Although yotes are usually wary of humans, they will come close if they've never felt threatened by humans and have succeeded in finding something to eat in the process.
Reports of yotes in suburban housing projects are not uncommon. Just means these particular yotes have become more comfortable hunting prey closer to humans due to the fact they've not yet been given a reason to leave and not come back. In other words, the yotes rewards(prey) has become greater then their risks.

That's why I have big dogs!! A German Shepard and a Husky/wolf.

There are benefits of owning a big dog and living in the middle of the woods.
There's also a downside.:rolleyes:
Yotes are around here year round but every Sept.(or there abouts) seems they are very vocal. When they get talking at night, our shephard goes out of his mind. Runs through the house growling,snarling and then, he starts to howling as almost trying to communicate with them. This goes on till I get out of bed and fire 2-3 shotgun blasts down into the ravine.
Before I retired, this made getting up for work @ 0400 very aggravating.:mad:

JohnKSa
April 14, 2012, 02:13 PM
My next door neighbor nearly lost his dachsund to a coyote some years back. He heard a ruckus in the back yard and looked out to see a coyote trying to jump back over his 4ft chainlink fence with the dachsund in its mouth. It couldn't make the jump with the dachsund. When he ran out into the yard, the coyote dropped the dachsund, which was not hurt badly, and made its escape.

vandyatc
April 14, 2012, 02:21 PM
I was within 20' of one in Louisville last weekend in a metro park. It wasn't the slightest bit worried about me. It ran out of the woods and into a neighborhood when I rode by and he deemed me to be no threat. I think he was looking for a schnauzer breakfast...

4V50 Gary
April 14, 2012, 02:29 PM
Even if your dog is bigger than the coyote, the coyote will lure it away where the pack can take down the bigger dog.

Double Naught Spy
April 14, 2012, 04:54 PM
Generally 'yotes are extremely wary of humans and your obvious presence(calling the dogs) combined with the 'yote's lack of fear may mean the 'yote has more problems than just hungry pups.

The yotes that are most wary of humans are yotes that haven't spent much time around them. If you have a yote that is used to cruising through your neighborhood, he won't be nearly as wary. Coyotes often do quite well living in close proximity to humans.

ltc444
April 14, 2012, 05:46 PM
in the Phoenix valley it is not unusual for coyotes to take dogs in the back yards. Hikers have actually had dogs grabbed while they were on leashes. There is one reported case of a yote going through a doggie door and eating a Pomerian on the owners living room floor.

The problem is that coyotes have become so familiar with humans, (idiots feeding them) that they do not fear us. Depending on your local laws, I would carry a pistol with me when ever I take my dogs out.

gyvel
April 14, 2012, 08:45 PM
The last time I was at The Sonora Desert Museum outside of Tucson, we had a little picnic lunch under one of the ramadas outside the entrance. The coyotes just came right up like ordinary dogs expecting a handout. Not good.

rickyrick
April 15, 2012, 07:33 AM
One hunting method is to use a dog that's been trained to lure a coyote back to shooting range.

hogdogs
April 15, 2012, 08:00 AM
Then there are the "yote doggers" who may or may not use a firearm at all...
the third attachment Is of the hounds on a yote... no blood and gore but I don't wanna be accused of not givin' warning...

These are are from one of our northern midwest states...

Brent

rickyrick
April 15, 2012, 08:32 AM
Those are pretty cool pics

gyvel
April 16, 2012, 03:57 AM
The photos show the exact same thing that the coyotes would do to a solo hunting dog if the tables were turned. They are both DOGS, and their instincts and behaviors under similar circumstances are identical. Feral dogs would do this to both another dog OR a coyote.

I have an ongoing understanding with coyotes. Stay on the Forest Service side of the fence and there will be NO problems. Cross that line and you will get shot if I see you. Unfortunately, they sneak across at night and have decimated my cat population, even the "coyote smart" ones. (I need cats around for rodent control.)

In defense of our local coyotes, they do play an important part in controlling the rabbit population. This year, there has been a bumper crop of jack rabbits and cottontails for some reason. Something needs to be done to keep them under control.

Coyotes, much like nuclear power, are a double edged sword. They are very useful as part of the ecosystem, but the constant encroachment of humans on their habitat has forced them to become migratory and they are now spread virtually from coast to coast. Familiarity with humans has caused many of them to lose their fear of people and civilization with the obvious bad results.

Thankfully, my dogs keep them at bay if they detect their presence, but, since my pups are getting a bit older, they aren't as sharp as they used to be.:(

Deja vu
April 16, 2012, 06:23 PM
I posted this last year but ill post it again.

I was out sighting in my J-Frame 640 (357 magnums). The gun has a Crimson Trace grips on it and I was having problems getting it to stay on target.

Just so you know this gun is very loud.

I was shooting in a place I dont go that often but pretty near to where I do a lot of shotgun shooting. I had shot may be 10 rounds when I get this weird feeling. I looked around but did not see any thing. I reloaded my pistol and then I felt it again. I looked around and then I see it. There was a Coyote about 10 feet from me. It looked really sick. It was sneaking up on me really low.

Well I did not want it to bite me so I turned the gun on the Coyote. I examined the Coyote a little with a long sick and I could tell it only had 3 legs. After trying (in vain) to get the laser sight to work right I reported the animal to fish and game in Pocatello. I never heard back what happened. I did later see the fish and game officer up in that area a few times. When I talked to him he did not know about the incident but he was called up there to check on reports of Coyotes attacking peoples dogs. He said that there where several reports last year.

tchunter
April 17, 2012, 05:17 PM
Those are some great pics! One of my dogs is a wiemeraner about 90lbs., the other an australian shepard about 65lbs. I've trained both to track blood, so they spend a lot of time in the woods. The only problem is they have a bad habbit of chasing coyotes. With the number of yotes around this area I didn't want them to go meet the pack. Well anyway maybe this will send a message, not the biggest but he paid the price!

tchunter
April 17, 2012, 05:18 PM
Those are some great pics! One of my dogs is a wiemraner about 90lbs., the other an australian shepard about 65lbs. I've trained both to track blood, so they spend a lot of time in the woods. The only problem is they have a bad habit of chasing coyotes. With the number of yotes around this area I didn't want them to go meet the pack. Well anyway maybe this will send a message, not the biggest but he paid the price!

tchunter
April 17, 2012, 05:20 PM
Well sorry for the suspense but my phone doesn't want to load the pic. Stand by. Never mind, it went real crazy!

rickyrick
April 17, 2012, 05:35 PM
Coozie in one hand and a coyote in the other......life is great :)

"JJ"
April 19, 2012, 07:48 AM
In my opinion, the coyote will come in after your dogs for either territorial, breeding or feeding issues. Right now, depending on location, the female should be bred and getting ready to drop a litter so I would say either the coyote perceived your dogs as a threat or a meal. I wouldn't assume that there was something "wrong" with the coyote (mange or rabies) just from its presence. The coyote will patrol its territory on a regular basis to keep every inch of it from a neighboring family unit. Depending on your dogs, my guess would be it was looking for a meal. I have four different places I hunt that lost family pets to coyotes. In fact while reading this thread, I just got a call from another land owner who had three coyotes hassling his full grown yellow lab Amos this morning! What a coincidence! This guy has a small property but the neighboring properties make his location a prime coyote spot. I have called and killed four coyotes on this place in the last year. Coyotes are cunning creatures! Never underestimate them! Good luck with your problem!

rickyrick
April 19, 2012, 12:41 PM
JJ,

What calls are you finding effective this time of year? I'm gonna try to hunt them throughout the summer this year, I assume the regular dinner bell calls would work with maybe some pup distress.

I never seriously hunted them in the summer, just the occasional got lucky and had seen them before they saw me.

On a side note, I am always amazed at how many I see just sitting and watching me when I have no rifle. I think they can smell gun oil, LOL.

twobit
April 19, 2012, 01:48 PM
One hunting method is to use a dog that's been trained to lure a coyote back to shooting range.


There is a new protection detail for just such matters....
just call.....wait for it......

K911

http://i888.photobucket.com/albums/ac84/twobit601/sniperdog.jpg

http://i888.photobucket.com/albums/ac84/twobit601/sniperdog2.jpg

thallub
April 19, 2012, 02:30 PM
One hunting method is to use a dog that's been trained to lure a coyote back to shooting range.

Yes, it works very well. Coyotes do not like dogs in their area. Numerous bird dogs are killed in this part of OK every year by coyotes.

A friend is a dedicated coyote hunter. She has two mutts trained to play in the pasture and attract coyotes. When the dogs get chased they bring the coyote in to get killed. The same lady has two pairs of Russian wolfhounds: They make short work of coyotes.

Discern
April 19, 2012, 10:14 PM
twobit,

How good of a shot is your sniper dog? Petty neat pictures.

I have posted this link before. These dogs do a good job of bringing in the coyotes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AGrl5PiHe1s

OkieGentleman
April 20, 2012, 07:29 PM
I live in the SW edge of Oklahoma City metro. West of me is a lot of undeveloped property. One evening when we had guests visiting from the East Coast area I took them out to my front lawn and told them to listen. You could hear the coyotes singing and yelping not more that 200 yards from my front porch. Freaked out my guests that WILD DANGEROUS ANIMALS were ALLOWED to run loose in the city limits. All I could do is chuckle quietly.
Last month about 2 miles into the more settled area of the metro I has a coyote cross the street in front of me at about noon.
By the way American Indians believe the coyote is a trickster who stole fire and gave it to man, but can't keep from being a pain in the butt to everyone he meets.

cookie5
April 20, 2012, 08:33 PM
Get them yotes !!!

gyvel
April 20, 2012, 09:09 PM
OK, here's a tip that works. (I know, I've done it.) Drink lots of liquids, then go out and pee all along your fence or property line. This is how canines define territory.

The coyote, wolf, whatever, will come up, smell your "mark" and then proceed to "mark" the same spot. This delineates the boundary of your and the animal's territory, and generally, it is respected. You do need to go out and refresh occasionally, though.

Laugh if you like, but it works.

shortwave
April 20, 2012, 11:44 PM
^^^Ummm...
...I wouldn't try this if you live in a populated area.

Not doubting your word just don't think the Judge will buy the story. :eek::D

BillyBeards
April 21, 2012, 06:16 AM
We heard one howling last night and then a while later we actually heard it take some small animal. The wife did not like hearing the struggle or when I said "that's the circle of life honey". It sounded like a small dog but I had to reassure my wife that it was probably some other small animal and not someones pet.
People seem so surprised to hear these things but the more condos they build the less space the wildlife has.

gyvel
April 21, 2012, 10:09 AM
^^^Ummm...
...I wouldn't try this if you live in a populated area.

You've got a point there, as I do live now in a semi remote area. However, I first learned of the trick when I lived in Miami, FL.

My next door neighbor had a very viscious pit bull that he usually left to guard his business. On occasion he would bring it home and let it loose in his back yard.

At the time I had small children, and the dog seemed to have a proclivity to attempt to climb the fence to get at them, and me as well.

I first learned of this little "trick" from a documentary about a guy who lived in the Northwest Territories and was studying wolves. Apparently, he was in a lonely shack in wolf country, and the wolves (being naturally curious, and probably hungry) were closing in on his cabin. He related how he drank lots of tea, then went out and "marked" various rocks around his cabin, at which point, the wolves would come and "mark" the other side of the rock to delineate their "territory" and left him alone after that.

I figured I had nothing to lose with my neighbor's pit bull (I had already warned him that, because I had small children, I would not hesitate to kill the dog if it got in my yard), so, very late one night, after consuming copious amounts of Diet Coke, I went out and "marked" the fence.

Naturally, the pit came charging up to the fence, but, much to my surprise, stopped, sniffed the fence, proceeded to "mark" his side and never bothered me again.

So, you have a point about populated areas, but just go out very late at night and take care of it. Trust me: It works.

Art Eatman
April 21, 2012, 10:38 AM
Farley Mowat's "Never Cry Wolf". Interesting read.

MLeake
April 21, 2012, 11:39 AM
We haven't had a problem with coyotes stalking our dogs, since the dogs are only outdoors on their own in daylight, in an enclosure, if at all. Normally they are with me and/or the wife, whether indoors or out.

However, we have coyotes in the area, and the things are huge. We recently moved from Georgia, where coyotes were maybe 35-50lbs, to NW Missouri... I mistook a coyote for a fawn, at first the other day, as it jumped out of a ditch near the road, as it was that tall - but it became immediately clear it was a coyote.

Two days ago, I saw a lone coyote in my west pasture, and I'd estimate its size as German Shepherd. Two of us saw it (a gentleman who was delivering our horses was with me), and it was definitely a coyote - although at first I thought it might have been a neighbor's dog.

I've never seen coyotes this size; they look like small wolves.

Finally convinced my wife to carry a 442 when she tends the horses at night, though - she saw one of the beasts the other day.

I'm not too worried that they will do anything, but on the other hand, if they do, these things are big enough that ONE would pose a threat, let alone a pack.

rickyrick
April 21, 2012, 02:55 PM
^^maybe it was a red wolf.

rickyrick
April 21, 2012, 02:58 PM
^^maybe it was a red wolf.




http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ac/07-03-23RedWolfAlbanyGAChehaw.jpg

CCCLVII
April 21, 2012, 04:46 PM
My wife lost a little yappy dog to a coyote many years ago before I met her.

gyvel
April 21, 2012, 11:41 PM
Farley Mowat's "Never Cry Wolf". Interesting read.

Yes, exactly. It was a TV documentary about Farley Mowat and his study of wolves in northwestern Canada. I didn't mention him as Farley Mowat is not exactly a household name. When I was a small kid, I really enjoyed his book The Dog Who Wouldn't Be.

At any rate, I found his method to be extremely useful and it does work.

tahunua001
April 22, 2012, 12:32 AM
some coyotes have been known to hybridize with domestic dogs. australian shepherds are a major breed that they tend to go for if I remember correctly. however I've heard more stories of coyotes running dogs to death than I have of making coydog pups. I guess it depends on the dogs...I am surprised that the coyote came as close to you as it did, usually ours are gone if you come within 200 yards.

rickyrick
April 22, 2012, 09:02 AM
Most times they are gone if they spot you. But on a few occasions I've spotted them watching. One time is was cutting twine off of a hay bale and turned around a one was sitting behind me just sitting and looking. No rifle, of course. While their behavior is predictable, in many cases, its not.

Their ability to adapt, go after different prey, eat berries, or down some cow patties to get through a tough spell has made them flourish.

Ps. Mr T01. Don't mention coydogs, they don't exists, government agents will be at your door soon.......:D

"JJ"
April 23, 2012, 08:13 AM
Yeah, coy-dogs can be a touchy subject! Rickyrick you are right on with the sounds. They are always looking to fill their bellies & with the pups geting ready to hit the ground the pup distress will also provoke a response! You may also try some lone howls but make sure to keep them on the higher pitched side. You want the resident coyotes to think they can whoop the intruder not run from it! Also, if they are using the same trails on a regular basis, you can set up an ambush. Sort of like a deer hunt but for coyotes! Just bark at one when you get it in the sights! They will usually turn broadside for the perfect shot! Make sure to take pics to share with the forum!

Hansam
April 23, 2012, 08:58 AM
Never lost a dog to coyote nor have coyote stalked my dogs but they're big dogs... not something a coyote would consider food.

My wife has however lost a 5 month old shih tzu puppy to a red tailed hawk...:eek:

rickyrick
April 23, 2012, 10:07 AM
The ambush method works well with coyotes and pigs. Coyote tracks are pretty distinct in dust. They hold their shape better than hoof tracks. If fresh they can easily be distinguished from dogs.

The best way that I can describe the difference is that dog tracks have a happier rounder shape and coyote is a little longer than wide and appears more menacing. Dogs and coyotes show nails in their tracks, cats do not.

"JJ"
April 23, 2012, 12:56 PM
Also the middle two toes on a coyote are close together with the claws almost touching and turned toward each other. Because they are so close the coyote track will have an odd shaped "X" formed between the toes and the pad. A dog will usually have three distinct lines on the toe end and the two middle toes will almost point away from each other. Of course there are exceptions! And to help destinguish between cat and canine on a packed or sandy soil that might not show claws clearly, a cat has three distinct lobes on its rear pad where a canine's pad is just rounded on the back side. I hope this all helps. Find a good trail and pop some coyotes!

gyvel
April 23, 2012, 11:50 PM
Also the middle two toes on a coyote are close together with the claws almost touching and turned toward each other.

Actually, quite a few dogs exhibit that very same characteristic.

"JJ"
April 24, 2012, 08:41 AM
A dog will
usually have three distinct lines on the toe
end and the two middle toes will almost
point away from each other. Of course
there are exceptions! Make sure to quote the part where I threw in the "usually" and the "of course there are exceptions"! :) In general, a "large" or coyote size dog will tend to have the spread middle toes. But yes, some domestic dogs do exhibit that feature. The smaller domestics (terriers and such that tend to have the "coyote" print) don't usually make to many tracks in the same area as coyotes before they become prey .

Hunter Customs
April 25, 2012, 08:23 AM
We haven't had a problem with coyotes stalking our dogs, since the dogs are only outdoors on their own in daylight, in an enclosure, if at all. Normally they are with me and/or the wife, whether indoors or out.

However, we have coyotes in the area, and the things are huge. We recently moved from Georgia, where coyotes were maybe 35-50lbs, to NW Missouri... I mistook a coyote for a fawn, at first the other day, as it jumped out of a ditch near the road, as it was that tall - but it became immediately clear it was a coyote.

Two days ago, I saw a lone coyote in my west pasture, and I'd estimate its size as German Shepherd. Two of us saw it (a gentleman who was delivering our horses was with me), and it was definitely a coyote - although at first I thought it might have been a neighbor's dog.

I've never seen coyotes this size; they look like small wolves.

Finally convinced my wife to carry a 442 when she tends the horses at night, though - she saw one of the beasts the other day.

I'm not too worried that they will do anything, but on the other hand, if they do, these things are big enough that ONE would pose a threat, let alone a pack.

MLeake, welcome to Missouri.
I've killed a lot of coyotes here in Missouri, most were in the 35 to 50 pound range like what you had in Georgia.
However I've killed a few in the 70 pound range.

Ive seen packs of coyotes with as many as 9 in a pack. I just got a call from a fellow the other day that said he had 10 in a pack that was in with his cattle.

Two days ago I was out on a horse and seen three in a pack, can't shoot them right now because season is closed during spring turkey season.

Best Regards
Bob Hunter

Flintknapper
April 25, 2012, 03:50 PM
Even if your dog is bigger than the coyote, the coyote will lure it away where the pack can take down the bigger dog.

I have personally witnessed this exact thing. We live in the country and routinely have coyotes cross behind the house in the pasture there. We had a Border Collie who thought it his job to "watch over" the back yard and pasture.

One morning I looked the window to see a group of three Coyotes just entering the pasture. The dog noticed them right away and started walking out toward them (still 200 yds. separating them). I knew the B/C wouldn't go all the way out there...but went to get my rifle just in case.

I did not call out to our dog...because I wanted to see what the Yodel Dogs would do (continue coming or flee). As soon as the lead Coyote spotted our dog (now sitting down about 50 yds. from the house) he immediately broke into a trot that brought him within 30-40 yds. of our dog. The Coyote then turned and made a big half circle back and forth.

The other two Coyotes hung back a ways and split off, one to the left the other to the right. Both just stood there watching the first one taunt the dog.

Finally, the B/C could take no more and loped out after the Coyote...which promptly ran over to a big brush pile I had pushed up in the pasture. It ran to the top of the pile and would come down about half way then go back up, while the B/C chased it. Only when the B/C got too close would it "snap" and "snarl".

In the meantime...the other two Coyotes moved in and flanked my dog. I could see this wasn't a "game" anymore and I moved out onto the back porch with the rifle. I called to our B/C but he pretty much ignored me (unusual for him). I thought about calling him off one more time but was afraid that if I diverted his attention away from the Coyote, it would attack him.

By now the other two were getting really close, their intention was clear.

I quickly sent a shot just over the top of the coyote on the brush pile (didn't want my dog to jump on it if I shot the coyote) and that worked, all the coyotes cleared out at break neck speed and the Border Collie didn't care for it either...as he came running back to the house all slinking and with his tail tucked half between his legs.

I have NO DOUBT those coyotes were trying to lure my dog out there (which they did) and purposed to "stretch him out" (all three attack him).

Not for food, they have plenty of that around here...but as matter of territory.

BoogieMan
April 26, 2012, 06:48 AM
Even if your dog is bigger than the coyote, the coyote will lure it away where the pack can take down the bigger dog
I have seen many videos and comments about this on youtube. i have a coyote problem at my house in Mt Holly, NC. I have a Great Dane and a Lab but I am worried they might split them up or lure one of them off when the other isnt out there. I have seen yotes in PA when deer hunting but its purely accidental. How do I get rid of them. Hear them all the time but I cant ever get a shot at them. Can I set a snare or other trap without getting by-catch? A proved lure so I can get a shot at them?

"JJ"
April 26, 2012, 07:19 AM
Hey BoogieMan! You can catch coyotes in both snares and foot hold traps. But if it will catch a coyote, it will catch a dog! You have to figure out if you can take that risk. The best way to get rid of them, in my opinion, is to hunt them. Like all wild animals, they are creatures of habit. They will use the same trail over and over. A good scout outing may reveal the access point to your property. A barbed wire fence is great a snagging guard or tail hairs! ;) If you can find this trail, & you will know it if you find it, find a place to set up an ambush. Get the distance the you like to shoot away from the trail where you can see well but can't be seen. Mind the wind! Here in NE Texas we USUALLY have a south wind. Find a spot that will not blow your scent cone on the trail with your typical wind direction & check the wind before setting up. While scouting you may also carry some red fox urine to spray to stir up some activity. Coyotes HATE red fox! Once you find "your" spot, find the place you would like the coyote to be when you shoot. Place a sample of your smallest dog's scat there & the coyote WILL stop to investigate. If not, a high pitched bark will do the trick. Good luck!

Hansam
April 26, 2012, 07:26 AM
^^ What he said. That and get a good howler and learn how to use it. Don't bother with the electric ones just get a mouth piece and learn to make it work. Go camp out in a tree stand in camo and give a good howl or better yet "ring the dinner bell" and give'em a wounded rabbit howl.

They'll come running and you just have to be prepared to shoot.

"JJ"
April 26, 2012, 09:17 AM
Yep, you can aalso call them in. But that will add in some other factors. If you use a distress call they will almost always circle downwind of the sound(you). So you must set up accordingly. If you use coyote vocals, learn the language before you just sound off. Certain howl/barks mean full alert/warning. A deep pitched howl represents an old large intruder which will provoke a flight instead of a fight! The wrong vocal can end your hunt before it begins! ;) I'm not saying it can't be done, just that it takes a bit more planing. If calls is your choice start watching videos and learning the sounds. Maybe get on a predator hunting forum to get more first hand knowledge & experience. The Texas Predator Posse(not just for Texans) & Bucking the Odds are both great forums with great folks who like to share their knowhow! Some of their members are members here as well. Bucking the Odds also has a bunch of hunt videos to watch for free for members. Membership is free on both. If you stop by say hi, I am "JJ" there as wel! Whatever happens, keep us updated & take pics! ;) Good Luck!

BoogieMan
April 26, 2012, 10:52 AM
Ill have to take a scouting walk and look more closly for where they are moving. Im from NJ so when in the NC woods im always looking for copper heads not game. Not used to watching out for anything that can bight back.

Gunplummer
April 26, 2012, 11:05 AM
I have skipped through this thread and am amazed by the comments. I live near Bucks County, Pa. and we have had coyotes here for more than 20 years. They (coyotes) moved in from somewhere else. The area is farms, woods, cities, towns, swamps. We have it all. Coyotes are rarely sighted. When coyotes are shot they are usually in the 50# to 70# range. They simply can not out breed the hunters around here. I have noticed over the years that Pennsylvania boys (on an average)can really shoot. I have been out west and those coyotes look like pups compared to the eastern coyotes. When you drive around here you see nothing but dogs walking around with no owner about. You guys must be doing something wrong.

BoogieMan
April 26, 2012, 12:08 PM
I have never been around bucks county yotes, we have them in SJ also. Thing is in SJ they are not coming into my yard. In NC they are, one ran between my wife and 6 y/o daughter who were within 30' of each other. Thats when we bought the great dane. Since I none of us have seen one in the yard but we hear them close all night and the dane wants to go after them.
Even us Jersey guys can shoot what we can see.

rickyrick
April 26, 2012, 01:15 PM
Western coyotes are little because the are hungry. Hungry coyotes will cause the most trouble. They will eat anything to survive, even cow poop. I have actually kept coyotes in check by providing them with a supply of dead pigs.

It's pretty easy to over hunt them. They get keen real quick. As an experiment, I put out some spoiled chicken in front of the game camera and the came back to the same spot for three weeks. So, the next time the calls wear out, I will try chicken and ambush. As stated before, if you find a trail you can easily ambush them if conditions are right.

The snares will catch anything that walks so use caution.

OkieGentleman
April 26, 2012, 03:36 PM
A farmer I once knew had a mixed breed mutt that was pretty good sized husky looking dog. Its name was Bear because when he was young from a distance he looked like a small black bear. He said when Bear was young the local coyotes lured Bear, with an in heat female, out into a pasture. Well the dog managed to get back to the house though he was chewed up some. The dog got well and grew to be a large dog. The farmer said that when ever he heard the coyotes singing out by his house, if he goes out the next day and does some searching in the fields by his house, he would find a find a dead female coyote that the Bear had killed. That dog hated coyotes with a passion.

Hansam
April 26, 2012, 03:50 PM
Here in WI we aren't allowed to hunt coyote over bait despite the fact that they are considered a varmint and its open season on them year round and are one of only two critters you can hunt at night. Heck land owners don't even have to have a hunting license to hunt them if they're on the owner's private land. However for some stupid reason we are not allowed to bait them in.

bamaranger
May 26, 2012, 01:40 AM
Lots of folks are loosing pets/dogs to coyotes in my area. Luring out to the pack is one of their tricks.

Lots of stuff on Youtube of coyotes fooling with pets.

buck460XVR
May 26, 2012, 12:42 PM
A friend of mine just took this picture in a campground outside Prince George BC.........

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/s320x320/582455_3968214601949_1177971473_4065871_1993766227_n.jpg

scrubcedar
May 26, 2012, 06:33 PM
Lived in a rural suburb of Denver when my kids were smaller. (9-14y.o.) The coyotes were VERY thick in the area and equally aggressive. It got to the point where nightly we would hear the yipping that they used to communicate while they were running down prey, then silence when they caught it. The kids started coming home in the evening saying as the sun started to go down the coyotes would start to follow them. The thing that prompted some changes was when they came in, and ran in the door terrified saying a pack had followed them making those sounds. They were on their bikes at the time and able to get safely home, barely. I called the local LE and asked if they had heard anything along those lines. Turns out new building in the area had concentrated them near our house and they were killing pets and scaring joggers pretty much daily. Too close to town to shoot, too many to handle that way anyway. Bought the kids bear pepper spray, best I could do. Part of the reason we moved not too long after.

thallub
May 26, 2012, 06:56 PM
Since my last post a coyote marked my pickup sitting the driveway by defecating on the top of the cab. Put two leg hold traps in the truck bed along with some bad venison and caught a large male coyote the next night. One of the neighbors saw me kill that coyote with a crossbow and thought it was awful.

That coyote could have easily killed one of the small neighborhood kids.

scrubcedar
May 26, 2012, 08:10 PM
Thallub, feel free to share my experience with your neighbors. They probably don't understand what the stakes are, city folks maybe? My kids experience scared me worse than I like to admit. Whenever they started that yipping sound in the evening and the kids weren't home it almost made me sick. It also made me sad that my kids were growing up in a different time than I did. All of us when we were kids were crack shots with our souped up wrist rockets. We used steel 00 buck for ammo,a perfectly capable set up for small game. I don't know how many of them we would have killed but they would have learned to leave us alone quickly. When I mentioned this to the LE officer I had on the phone he got angry and threatened to arrest any of the kids he found with them. Somewhere along the line we've lost something. I'm not sure how to describe it but I know It's gone.

thallub
May 26, 2012, 09:33 PM
When I mentioned this to the LE officer I had on the phone he got angry and threatened to arrest any of the kids he found with them. Somewhere along the line we've lost something. I'm not sure how to describe it but I know It's gone.

Yes, it is gone and thats very sad. Growing up in WV every boy i knew had a slingshot. Where i live kids aged about 3-6 run all over the place unsupervised. All thats needed for a disaster is a bold hungry coyote.

Once in awhile theres a turn toward sanity but not often. For many years the OK game commission zealously protected cougars under threat of arrest. Folks grew fed up with cougars attacking livestock and contacted their legislators. The legislature passed a law that allows the killing of cougars that threaten humans or livestock.

scottd913
May 27, 2012, 01:47 AM
seems if you want to just keep them away you might wanna go to the local zoo and get some large cat urine place it around your perimeter: unless you just like shooting them, then I'm no hunter...dont hunters eat what they shoot?

JohnKSa
May 27, 2012, 02:36 AM
...dont hunters eat what they shoot?Not all hunting is the same.

When hunting to harvest game, it is illegal and is considered unethical to shoot a game animal or bird without making use of it as a food resource.

When hunting to control pests--an activity which is legal and necessary to control certain types of pest populations--there is no legal or ethical mandate to make use of the killed pest animals as a food resource. In some cases it would be foolish to even try.

ScottieG59
May 27, 2012, 02:36 AM
Though the backyard is fenced, I bring the dogs in a night due to predators like coyotes. One evening one was outside the fence. It did not hang long after I got home. It is one critter that just needs killing.

I know a lady who raises goats and coyotes go after them. She also has lamas. Those lamas will chase the coyotes down and kill them. I found it interesting lamas were like that.

tchunter
May 27, 2012, 05:53 AM
Since I started this post I have lost 9 meat chickens to coyotes. The neighbor kid down the road stays up to all hours of the night and has witnessed a large coyote on the property several times. I have since given him the green light to shoot. I hope I get waken up to the sound of a gun shot very soon. As for the coyote that stalked my dogs, I think my presence hunting them has been enough to keep them farther from the house lately. Unless they are just getting full on baby rabbtis and turkeys!

Husqvarna
May 27, 2012, 10:15 AM
Re scotty and the lamas. People in my country (sweden) has just recently vegan buying lamas ro protect their livestock against the wolf which is making a comeback strong. Ive been told donkeys work to!

sorry for my spelning my smarthphone isnt english

shortwave
May 27, 2012, 12:34 PM
Ive been told donkeys work to!

You were told correctly but the sheep farmers I know say llamas are much more aggressive with the yotes.

I had a rather scary experience last year at one of the sheep farms I hunt.

The farmers son wanted me to save a yote I shot as he was wanting to try his hand at a bit of taxidermy. Right at daybreak, I shoot a big male and am on my way out of the field, carrying the yote.
The farmers llama must have winded the yote and came running across the field at me. Yours truely dropped the yote and took off running for the fence. As I cleared the fence, I looked back to see the llama tap dancing on the yote. He literally stomped the yote till it was un-recognizable.
I have heard llamas can be aggressive but had never witnessed firsthand just how bad they could get until then. I'm sure the yote scent was on me and am glad Mr. Llama stopped at the yote and didn't pursue me cause I don't think I would have made it to the fence.

Lesson learned: farmers boy will have to get his own yote. :o

scrubcedar
May 27, 2012, 02:10 PM
...dont hunters eat what they shoot? I've still got a lot of pals down in southern Colorado who bag these critters nightly. I can get you as much free range Coyote meat as you'd like scott.:D Seriously you're right about the motives but looking at it the wrong way. Coyotes are normally killed to prevent loss of livestock, meat in other words.

Buzzcook
May 28, 2012, 01:16 PM
dont hunters eat what they shoot?

If you find a fly in your house, do you kill it? If so do you eat it?

rickyrick
May 28, 2012, 02:26 PM
Coyote hunting is mainly a management thing. But it's quite fun, so for many involved, it's a sport.

Gunplummer
May 29, 2012, 03:01 PM
You finally figured it out. When you hunt something (You have to be able to hit it) the something will soon get respect for guns. In Pa. we have huge coyote killing contests every year. I don't know what the misconceptions are about on this thread, but you can absolutely believe that no healthy coyote will stick his nose out around an area where they are heavily hunted and trapped. You have more to worry about from uncontrolled dogs and cats getting at livestock around here.

tchunter
May 29, 2012, 09:38 PM
I understand about controlling them by hunting them. When I started this thread my gut feeling was that that particular coyote wasn't quite right. Some of the info here has given me more to think about why it would have done that. As for hunting them enough to make a difference I have one major problem, 35,000 acres of corn and 100 hours a week. Winter is the only time I can spend a little time at it. I appreciate all the info posted here, its been a good conversation.

KevK.
May 31, 2012, 05:25 AM
My grandfather would pee in an old coke bottle then go out and spread it along the fence to keep the coyotes out. Never once saw a coyote in the yard though we would see them sometimes peeing on the fence.

Side note:
Where I work is a 400 acre campus in the middle of the St. Louis suburbs. The area is considered a nature preserve. We have deer, turkeys, owls, redtail hawks, and coyotes.

The coyotes would sometimes go after family pets when the rabbit population went down.

The coyotes normally are very shy and we only see them from dusk to dawn. There was a particular one that was kicked out of the family group and spent days being un-coyote before he disappeared. During they day he'd lay down in the middle of the parking lots, or along the side walk. We'd have to have coyote watches set up. People started to try and feed it.

It was a bit strange watching an animal behave so out of character we considered having someone come in and put it down.