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litng1
March 28, 2012, 11:31 AM
Got a bunch of this ammo.9mm but never seen it before.If I can figure out how to load pics.

PetahW
March 28, 2012, 02:05 PM
It's..................................

.

warrior poet
March 28, 2012, 02:08 PM
9mm rounds... 9x17 AKA .380 ACP, 9x18 Makarov, 9x19 Parabellum (NATO), 9x21 Largo, and 9x23 Win Mag. At least that's all the ones I can think of. Without a pic, I am clutching at straws.

Cheapshooter
March 28, 2012, 02:35 PM
9mm rounds... 9x17 AKA .380 ACP, 9x18 Makarov, 9x19 Parabellum (NATO), 9x21 Largo, and 9x23 Win Mag. At least that's all the ones I can think of. Without a pic, I am clutching at straws.
You forgot 9X18 Ultra!:D

Get the point litng1. you need pictures, and head stamp information because there are so many 9MM chamberings.

jonnyc
March 28, 2012, 06:25 PM
.....9mm Nambu, 9mm Federal, 9mm Winch. Mag., 9mm Flobert.....

Mike Irwin
March 28, 2012, 06:37 PM
9mm Nambu?

Never heard of that one before. I have heard of the 7mm and the 8mm Nambus...

gunsmokeTPF
March 28, 2012, 06:45 PM
The Type 26 revolver was 9mm jap. If it turns out that this is the ammo then you've hit the jackpot. This stuff is expensive and is hard to find. I know they can be duplicated by thinning out the rim of a .38 special cartridge, but I don't get involved with reloading, or fooling around with ammo. My friend has the type 26, which is a piece of garbage, but could use some ammo if you decide to sell.

jonnyc
March 28, 2012, 09:40 PM
It would be nice to know what the OP actually has....hint....hint....hint.

gyvel
March 29, 2012, 02:08 AM
The Type 26 revolver was 9mm jap.

Exactly, but Kijiro Nambu had nothing to do with the development of the revolver or the round.

Also, you left 9mm Browning Long (9x20), and 9mm rimfire shot off the list.

(Not to mention various 9mm pinfire cartridges, and the "other" 9mm Largo, the Spanish designation for .38 Colt.)

PetahW
March 29, 2012, 05:14 AM
Of course, it "could" be 9x57 Mauser rifle ammo, nes pas ? . :p

.

Winchester_73
March 29, 2012, 06:15 AM
9mm glisenti for yura pizza pie!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/9mm_Glisenti

Mike Irwin
March 29, 2012, 06:29 AM
Gyvel more or less nailed it.

Nambu appears to have worked on the design of the Type 26, but he was not the lead designer, he was a Junior Lieutenant at the time. I've never heard either it or the cartridge referred to as the 9mm Nambu.

"I know they can be duplicated by thinning out the rim of a .38 special cartridge"

The Type 26 Cartridge was apparently based on the .38 Smith & Wesson round. Usable cases can be made using that cartridge, but the .38 Special casing is too small at the head.

I fired a Type 26 fairly extensively some years ago. VERY heavy trigger pull, shot way high, but fun in a weird sort of way.

jonnyc
March 29, 2012, 08:48 AM
In the cartridge collector world it is commonly called the 9mm Nambu.

Mike Irwin
March 29, 2012, 09:58 AM
"In the cartridge collector world it is commonly called the 9mm Nambu."

I've been collecting cartridges for over 30 years, been going to cartridge shows for 20 years, and wrote an article on it for American Rifleman magazine.

As I said, I have NEVER seen reference to a 9mm Nambu.

Most common references are either 9mm Jap(anese) Revolver or 9mm Type 26, or a variation there of.

But, now that I google it, I see that the dumbing down of American continues unabashedly.

Sigh...

Microgunner
March 29, 2012, 10:03 AM
5mm pinfire?:D

Cheapshooter
March 29, 2012, 12:19 PM
If I can figure out how to load pics.


http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=292842

James K
March 29, 2012, 01:02 PM
I made ammo for the 9mm Type 26 by thinning the rims (from the front) of .38 S&W, then running the round into the .38 Special sizer die.

Jim

litng1
March 29, 2012, 03:36 PM
Im trying lol.How do I upload a pic from my phone

jonnyc
March 29, 2012, 05:47 PM
"But, now that I google it, I see that the dumbing down of American continues unabashedly."

Thanks Mike, I'll accept the dig with humility. But perhaps you travel in the wrong collector circles? If you get to SLICS or one of the PA cartridges shows, say Hi.

gyvel
March 29, 2012, 09:00 PM
I had a Type 26 back in the 80s that would actually chamber .38S&W, but the rims were just a hair too thick to allow the cylinder to turn freely.

I suspect the .38 S&W may have had some influence on the development of the Type 26 cartridge.

gyvel
March 29, 2012, 09:03 PM
Of course, it "could" be 9x57 Mauser rifle ammo, nes pas ?

Sigh... Or 9x56 Mannlicher Schoenauer.

Cheapshooter
March 29, 2012, 10:05 PM
If I can figure out how to load pics.

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e367/gatsby6306/DirtDOG.gif

Mike Irwin
March 30, 2012, 04:20 AM
Jonny, certainly wasn't a specific dig at you, and my apologies for making it seem such.

It's just interesting how things like this take on totally unrelated names, like how in some circles the 7.7 Arisaka became known as the .31 Jap.


"If you get to SLICS or one of the PA cartridges shows, say Hi."

I've been to the Denver-area show a number of times over the years.

I'd like to get to it again this year, but I'm not sure that that's going to happen.

litng1
March 30, 2012, 04:53 AM
No luck

jonnyc
March 30, 2012, 05:16 AM
OK, I have never heard .31 Jap!

Our show will be in Morgantown, PA again this year, Aug. 17-18. I always put myself at the first table as you enter. Hope you can make it.

litng1, if you email me your pic I can try to post it for you.

gunsmokeTPF
March 30, 2012, 03:04 PM
I've been around guns for over 50 years, but never heard of .31 Jap either. Maybe that's because I travel in different circles. When you really think about it the important thing is that when describing anything that the people you're describing it to understand what you are talking about.

Let's face it, when describing poop, or doo-doo, or crap, we know what's being descibed is still just plain sh^t. There's nothing wrong when someone with more knowledge, who means well, shares some of his wisdom by correcting a term being used. Let's face it, this is just a forum and not a classroom, so there's no reason for anyone to get upset about being corrected.

Even those who think they know everything will learn something new just by reading this, as well as other forums each day. By the way, does anyone know what the original ammo was?

Mike Irwin
March 30, 2012, 03:47 PM
.31 Jap certainly isn't a common usage, but you can google and find some references to it.

Several people at my hunting camp when I was a teenager called it that.

It was also used in print, here, bottom of page 57 in the Lowes Powder Horn ad.

http://www.gunsmagazine.com/1957issues/G0957.pdf


Do yourself a favor and don't look at the prices in the ads. You'll cry.



Oh, and Jonny?

There's also an ad in there for .42 Russian Berdan cartridges, Tula arsenal loads, in original string-wrapped six-count packets for $1 each...

Last one of those I saw at a show was $75.

Sigh.

gunsmokeTPF
March 30, 2012, 04:24 PM
I'm getting old and was around when prices were like this when I purchased guns in the 60's.
1968-S&W mod10 $39- PD price
1969-Colt DS $69
1969-Browning HP $85- Abercrombie & Fitch
1969-Baby Browning $50- Gone but saved undercover's life
1970-Colt SAA .45 $185- Abercrombie & Fitch
1971-Ithica Deluxe Deerslayer $120- Gone but not forgotten
1971-Colt Diamond Back .22 $125
1977-S&W DA .44Russian 1st year prod. 1881 pristine mint $335
Just to list a few, but there's lots more that can cause me to ball like a baby that's too painfull to think about. But at least I kept most of them.

James K
March 30, 2012, 06:34 PM
Sorry, kiddies, but ".31 Jap" and ".25 Jap" were the terms commonly used by US troops in WWII for the 7.7x58 and 6.5x50 Japanese rifle cartridges respectively.

Jim

gyvel
March 31, 2012, 09:25 AM
".31 Jap" (and to a lesser degree, ".25 Jap") were also buzz terms commonly seen in articles in the various gun rags in the 50s and 60s about either reloading, or sporterizing some WWII war trophy. I guess it was a carry over from the WWII GI field slang.

mauserMan
April 3, 2012, 06:34 PM
That link was a jaw dropper for a young guy like me!

GERMAN LUGERS Ã
Genuine German Lu er 9mm
Autos. Blue finish checkered
walnut grips in good mechan- u
ical and shooting condition.. .. .$47.50
Extra clips ................. .$ 7.00 7
Ammo 100 rds. ..............$ 9.50

I don't think I could hold one for that.

Jim Watson
April 3, 2012, 07:35 PM
Before you get all starry-eyed over 1960s gun prices, remember (or ask Dad or Grandpa) what salaries and wages were in the 1960s.
In 1969 I was a newly degreed engineer with some accrued seniority as a co-op student. I had to wait until my first raise to get $10,000 a year. The guns looked just as expensive then as they do now.

hAkron
April 4, 2012, 10:23 PM
Appearantly RCBS thinks 9mm Nambu is an acceptable name for the cartridge.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/847845/rcbs-neck-reamer-9mm-nambu

gyvel
April 5, 2012, 01:28 PM
Appearantly RCBS thinks 9mm Nambu is an acceptable name for the cartridge.

Either that or it's a mistake.

Mike Irwin
April 5, 2012, 01:46 PM
I'm trying to figure out just what case they would be using to form the "9mm Nambu" that would require neck reaming given that the .38 Smith & Wesson case can generally be sized and the rim thinned, absolutely NO neck reaming required...

I think the case reamer and the forming die are for 8mm Nambu.

RCBS does have reloading dies for the 9mm Type 26 revolver cartridge (note proper name :))...

I think that neck reamer is mislabeled. I bet it and the form die are for converting .38 Special cases to 8mm Nambu automatic.