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EdInk
March 19, 2012, 10:28 AM
I would like to have a set of antique style duelling pistols. Unfortunately, the real ones are extremely expensive. (Also, I would be a little hesitant to shoot them given the uncertain quality of steel from the era.)

I haven't had any good luck finding a pair of modern production ones, which is what I would really like to purchase. (If the prices are reasonable.) However, I have found a few companies that offer DIY kits for these kinds of pistols. (I would just buy two of the same kit and accessories to make a full set of duelling pistols.)

Anyway, I was curious if anyone on the forum has any experience with making one of the pistols from a kit?

If so, are they difficult to assemble or could an average guy do it with good results without the help of a master woodworker to do alot of handfitting and what not? Are there certain brands which are better quality than others? MOST IMPORTANTLY, do they hold up if actually fired with any regularity? (I figured they would get shot 10-20rds each every few months for fun.)

Lastly, do the makers of these kits offer them completely assembled too? (Is it worth it, if they do?)


Thank you for your help.

aarondhgraham
March 19, 2012, 10:43 AM
Over 30 to be exact,,,

Me and three buddies all bought percussion pistol kits at a gun show,,,
I had tons of experience in woodworking so mine came out nice,,,
The other three ranged the gamut of cosmetic achievement.

The one thing they all had in common is that they all shot the same,,,
It didn't matter how ugly or pretty the finished product was,,,
The accuracy of them all was comparable to any other.

Minute of coffee can or slightly better at 25 yards.

Pedersoli was the brand of the gun kits we bought,,,
All of the parts fit with a minimum of filing.

There's not much monetary savings in a kit though,,,
At least that's what a quick Google search showed to me.

But I did enjoy shooting the gun,,,
Much more fun than a muzzle loading rifle for me,,,
And the handgun was ever so much easier to clean after shooting it.

The four of us spent a happy summer "dueling" with each other,,,
I eventually sold my pistol to one of the other guys,,,
Because he wanted a "dueling pair" as well.

Go for it my friend,,,
You'll have fun.

Aarond

.

Pahoo
March 19, 2012, 11:01 AM
There's not much monetary savings in a kit though,,,
At least that's what a quick Google search showed to me
Very true and you have to measure the value of personal satisfaction. In past year, I have done a number of kits and helped other put their together. Personally kind of glad that is behind me. .... :rolleyes:

If you are halfway handy, then you should have little or no problems. Just take your time, be patient with the project and yourself. I try to fully assemble the piece first, to a working state, mark my areas of concern, disassemble and do the final fit and finish. ... :)

Be Safe !!!

EdInk
March 19, 2012, 11:05 AM
This is going to be one of those "eventual projects" on my list. I am going to take my time and research it. I am not a gunsmith by any measure and my experience with wood working is limited too. My biggest concern is buying the kit and having it turn out crappy. (My biggest concern is the finishing of the wood.) Also, I don't really want to be into this more than about a thousand dollars for everything (both guns), is that going to be possible and still get decent quality?

Pahoo
March 19, 2012, 11:14 AM
I don't really want to be into this more than about a thousand dollars for everything (both guns), is that going to be possible and still get decent quality?
Yes it is !! .... ;)

Be Safe !!!

EdInk
March 19, 2012, 11:18 AM
Any recommendations (or warnings) on specific brands?

EdInk
March 19, 2012, 11:20 AM
Also, I forgot to ask if you guys prefer a flintlock or percussion cap pistol?

Any pics of ones you've completed?

Pahoo
March 19, 2012, 11:23 AM
Any recommendations (or warnings) on specific brands?
There aren't that many choices left out there. .... :mad:
Traditions and Lyman are still good enough and when you find more, send me the link. One thing you will run into, is having to get the barrel blued, black oxide of plumb-brown. ... ;)

Be Safe !!!

EdInk
March 19, 2012, 11:33 AM
Good to know. I am starting to think jus buying a completed one might be the way to go for me. Do they require anykind of FFL to buy (completed) or are they just considered a novelty item?

Pahoo
March 19, 2012, 11:47 AM
Do they require anykind of FFL to buy (completed) or are they just considered a novelty item?
They should not but have been seeing some sellers, in GB, requiring this. On these, all you should ever have to document, is that you are not a minor. .. ;)

Be Safe !!!

mykeal
March 19, 2012, 03:19 PM
This gentleman (http://www.sittingfoxmuzzleloaders.com/intro.html) still offers kits that can vary from simple to difficult. A few minutes on the phone with him will pay dividends as he will often offer to tailor the kits to your experience and desires for the finished product. Take a tour through his web site and then give him a call.

B.L.E.
March 19, 2012, 09:17 PM
The one thing they all had in common is that they all shot the same,,,
It didn't matter how ugly or pretty the finished product was,,,
The accuracy of them all was comparable to any other.

Minute of coffee can or slightly better at 25 yards.


With the right load and ball/patch combo, they'll shoot minute of X ring at 25 yards if the shooter does his part.

dlbarr
March 20, 2012, 01:24 AM
Any recommendations (or warnings) on specific brands?

You will pay a little more, but you will be totally fired up with a TVM pistol kit. you owe it to yourself to: 1) look at the website and 2) call & talk with Toni about their offerings. If you want a QUALITY pistol, you should at least consider this option. But it will cost you some more....

EdInk
March 20, 2012, 01:48 AM
Whats the deal with the double trigger on some models?

arcticap
March 20, 2012, 02:55 AM
A set trigger is either single set or double set and functions as described below.

Set trigger

A set trigger allows a shooter to have a greatly reduced trigger pull (the resistance of the trigger) while maintaining a degree of safety in the field. There are two types: Single Set and Double Set.


Single set trigger

A Single Set Trigger is usually one trigger that may be fired with a conventional amount of trigger pull weight or may be 'set' by usually pushing forward on the trigger. This takes up the creep in the trigger and allows the shooter to enjoy a much lighter trigger pull.


Double set trigger

As above, a double set trigger accomplishes the same thing, but uses two triggers: one sets the trigger and the other fires the weapon. Set triggers are most likely to be seen on customized weapons and competition rifles where a light trigger pull is beneficial to accuracy.

Double set triggers can be further classified by phase.[4] A double set, single phase trigger can only be operated by first pulling the set trigger, and then pulling the firing trigger. A double set, double phase trigger can be operated as a standard trigger if the set trigger is not pulled, or as a set trigger by first pulling the set trigger. Double set, double phase triggers offer the versatility of both a standard trigger and a set trigger.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigger_(firearms)

denster
March 21, 2012, 01:52 PM
Just a suggestion. If a set of dueling pistols is what you want. Keep an eye on gunbroker. Frequently they have sets of the Hamilton Burr duelers that were made by Uberti back in the 80s. The set ran almost $4,000 then and was not the instant collectable they were held up to be. Now they generally bring between 1200 and 1400 for the set which is a bargain as they come cased and the pistols are exteremely high quality exact duplicates of the originals.

Grant D
March 21, 2012, 02:30 PM
I bought a flintlock pistol kit years ago and made a mess of it,so I just gave it to a friend of mine. Went to his house a couple a weeks later and he showed me a beautiful flintlock pistol...and said thanks!

rodent.22
March 24, 2012, 06:59 AM
I built a CVA colonial pistol kit years ago, used cold brown on the barrel, and minwax stain on the stock. Spray polyurethane to finish it. Not accurate but worked for me. A very accurate easy-shooting pistol. Very simple to fit and finish. Buy a cheap kit first and build it to your satisfaction, then go for the pair of nice ones, if you are still inclined.:D

Legionnaire
March 24, 2012, 12:12 PM
I've thought about doing this over the years, and may yet. No question in my mind: were I to do so, it would be flintlocks all the way. While percussion caps might prove more reliable (no guarantee), if you want to play with a couple of nicely finished duelling pistols, flinters have far more class. Just sayin' ...