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C.M.Burns
March 12, 2012, 08:01 PM
Hi everyone,

First post here. I am a rather novice shooter I guess, as I have not owned my own gun. I have family that work and own a local gun shop and range near me and have been shooting for the past 2 years ever since I went one day and got the serious itch. Since day one, I go at most once every 2 weeks.

Been shooting lots of different guns but feel most comfortable with revolvers, most recently worked into some S&W 629 in 4 inch barrel and was having some serious fun.

I am buying my first gun, a revolver most likely, for home defense and just wanted some opinions. I am moving into a row home in a not-so-nice area. Would a 44 be too much? I am going to be living in a row home and some of the guys at the counter told me too much lead going too fast is going to go through walls.

The best revolver I have shot so far was a S&W 627, 4 inch 357 magnum 8 shooter. It was really beefy and solid and I like the idea of having a few extra shots, even though I know 1 or 2 would scare most.

I should also mention this will be my back up weapon to a Rem. 870 shotgun which my dad gave as a gift last year. This revolver will mostly be for practice at the range and also because I will not have free rental costs at my family owned range (going to go broke...) so ammo costs are also swimming through my head

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,

C.M.Burns

Webleymkv
March 12, 2012, 08:23 PM
Nearly any common handgun cartridge will be capable of penetrating multiple interior walls in a modern house (sheetrock and pine 2x4's). While the recoil of a .44 Magnum may be a bit much for most people to be able to shoot both quickly and accurately, a .44 Magnum revolver can also chamber and fire .44 Special ammunition which, ballistically, is quite similar to .45 ACP, and will offer lower recoil, flash, and report.

The 627 you mention is also a fine revolver that is well suited to home defense. While .357 Magnum makes an excellent self-defense cartridge, .38 Special ammunition can also be used in a .357 Magnum revolver should the shooter prefer a cartridge with lower recoil, report, flash, and/or cost.

Truth-be-told, both the 629 and 627 would be great revolvers, pick whichever one you shoot the best and are most comfortable with.

jknight8907
March 12, 2012, 08:24 PM
Since you liked the 627 so much, get that. It's an awesome gun, and you are already familiar with it. Your target won't likely know the difference. If you do lean toward the 44, try to shoot one before buying.

Rmart30
March 12, 2012, 08:32 PM
I would choose a fixed sight 4" 357 or 38.
LE trade ins of S&W 65's (357) 64's (38) and their blued model of cousins can be picked up online for $200-250. Fixed sight model seem to always be less than adj sight models and for home defense in close quarters adjustable sights are irrelevant.
I have bought several of these LE trade ins and all have been in very good mechanical shape and most with very minor wear and will last a lifetime.

sils79
March 12, 2012, 08:44 PM
irrelevant post...deleted

Nomadicone
March 12, 2012, 09:06 PM
I would buy a 357 in a K or L size frame but load it with 38 spl for indoors self defense. IMO the pressure levels of a 357 indoors are just too much for me indoors. I have heard of folks shooting a 357 in a room and having their ears bleed. As already suggested, if you do buy the 44 Mag I would also load it with 44 Spl.

Colorado Redneck
March 12, 2012, 09:41 PM
Get a box for your home defense gun that will be kept locked ALL the time. And then take it out to the range and shoot it a lot. :D

s4s4u
March 12, 2012, 09:50 PM
A hot 38 Special is plenty of medicine for bad guys, and is much easeir on the ears and eyes than a 357 maggie. I feel the 44 Special is a near perfect defense chambering. Cowboy loadings will put a serious hurtin' on a BG and don't have the crack of the 357's. The 45LC would also serve well.

Rivers2k
March 13, 2012, 12:06 PM
you said you had an 870 as a back up. I would view my 870 as my primary HD gun and my revolver as a back up. as you mentions ammo cost are an issue. my .45 ACP hardly gets shot because ammo prices are so high. If this is primarily a range gun I would get a 686 you can shoot .357 and .38's. Will meet any need you have in a revolver. oh and if you live in a row home a .44 will go through your neighbors walls.

a7mmnut
March 13, 2012, 12:10 PM
I'll second either a 686 or 66 Smith for generalist duties, quality, accuracy, and fun!

-7-

BigJimP
March 13, 2012, 02:20 PM
I think a .44 mag is a little too much ...but because follow up shots are a lot slower with a .44 mag than a .357 mag with the same length of barrel.

My opinion is a S&W K ( mod 19 or 66) or L frame ( 686 ) ....are your better choices ...in probably a 4" barrel. But it depends on what fits your hands the best ...and what you shoot the best...not what fits my hands or what I shoot the best. I have 3" .44 mag's and they're a little more difficult to shoot in tactical situations than any of my .357 mag revolvers in 2 1/2" or 4".

MonsterB
March 13, 2012, 02:57 PM
A 686 would be a very good option. Thing is, shooting 38 isn't much cheaper than 45, and much cheaper than 357. The price of 44 special and magnum is insane. A good 38 +p is definitely enough, and won't cost too much, or kick like a 44. Its all up to you but I would go with a nice older Smith 357 for what you want.

MonsterB
March 13, 2012, 02:58 PM
By the way, what is your family that owns the range telling you to do?

themalicious0ne
March 13, 2012, 04:00 PM
I have heard of folks shooting a 357 in a room and having their ears bleed.

I Accidentally fired my .357 in my room with a girl there too(dont ask my roomate took it out and left it loaded, guess i should have checked... also my fault) besides the point our ears did not bleed and we were both fine besides a little ringing of the ears.

themalicious0ne
March 13, 2012, 04:05 PM
however i agree with most of the posts here. if your comfortable with a revolver, get one. For home defense between the shotgun and revoler you will be fine. I'd recamend though that you get a .357. I dont think the .44's recoil will be too much to handle but if you are concerned about ammo prices. .44 is very expensive and the .357 is more than powerful enough as a bg stopper. .38 special is debateable depending on who you talk to but firing .38 down range is considerably cheaper. Hope this helps.

occorid
March 13, 2012, 05:52 PM
I don't believe that there is any such thing as Accidently shooting a gun in your room, doing so is -in my eyes- :eek::eek: is irresponsibility at is greatest . You may want to rethink owning a firearm until you are more mature and better schooled in safety. Please take this is the spirit of relief that you and your girlfriend are still alive.

Newton24b
March 13, 2012, 06:22 PM
anything that comes from a barrel will penetrate. I saw an interesting articleon loading for the charter arms 44 special, out of a 2.5 inch barrel the author was getting 19 inches of penetration through hard pack newspaper, just a good general idea of what can be done.

SIGSHR
March 13, 2012, 06:38 PM
I like the idea of an M-29 loaded with 44 Specials-the Spirit of Jeff Cooper will be with you. However there is a much wider selection of ammunition for the 38/357. I prefer a target sighted gun, you can get it adjusted just right for you, and in subdued light, stressful situation, glasses missing no Kentucky windage to worry about.

i.hunt
March 13, 2012, 06:50 PM
1984 it was a Smith and Wesson 686 with a 6" BBL, RRWO and I still have it to this day a great Handgun, the action is so smooth you would think it has had a trigger job.....

ClydeFrog
March 13, 2012, 07:31 PM
Howdy;
If you have the $$$ and the resources, I highly suggest the big S&W Military and Police 8 round .357magnum revolver.
You can train with cheap/light weight .38spl rounds, then pack .38spl +P or full power .357magnum loads for protection.
The M&P would not need a lot of custom add-ons or work and it would hold up under most conditions. A CT Lasergrip, or a Viridian white-light/green laser could be smart.
The .357magnum recoil & muzzle flash wouldn't be major issues due to the big revolver's size. It might have a practical intimidation factor. The M&P .357magnum could be fired or re-loaded one handed too(faster than a 12ga shotgun).
To my understanding, many S&W 8 shot .357magnum M&Ps are in service with the elite ESU or Emergency Services Units in New York & New Jersey.
The ESU cops use the M&P revolvers with lasers/white light units when they deploy body shields/body bunkers.

Clyde

C.M.Burns
March 13, 2012, 09:13 PM
Thanks so much for all the responses! Knew I would get some great input here after reading a lot of other threads.

@MonsterB - funny you should ask. My family (cousins) who own the gun shop/range think I should go for an automatic, even though I'm more comfortable with a wheel gun. They said I could "learn", but screw that right? I'm gonna go for what I trust and know. Plus I never said that family is that smart!

To those who suggested a 686, I have shot a few of those and boy were those a pleasure to sling some lead with (look at me with the lingo). Shot both a 6 and 7 shot 686 and just fit like a glove. I only brought up the 627 in my original post because it was a bit heftier and the sights on the one I was using were really working for me and could see very clearly.

Been playing around with some other revolvers this week and will update on what I pick. Thanks again!

Walklightly
March 13, 2012, 11:48 PM
I have a S&W 627 5" and a 327 R8 M&P both 8 shot .357s.

I also have a S&W 638 alminum snub, and a Ruger SP101 3" .357 that I prefer over my bigger ones for close incounters in small spaces.

Webleymkv
March 14, 2012, 01:40 PM
I don't believe that there is any such thing as Accidently shooting a gun in your room, doing so is -in my eyes- is irresponsibility at is greatest . You may want to rethink owning a firearm until you are more mature and better schooled in safety. Please take this is the spirit of relief that you and your girlfriend are still alive.

Even the most experienced shooters can have accidents. Unless you're willing to go and sell off all of your firearms immediately should you ever have an unintentional discharge, perhaps you should contemplate the meaning of the phrase "those who live in glass houses should not throw stones."

tomrkba
March 19, 2012, 11:18 PM
I have to disagree with the idea of purchasing a recent production S&W. Their build quality has slipped for some reason.

Example: http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=482125

I looked at the same gun at my local store and the barrel was canted. The lock is poorly designed. Lock failures are repeatable with light guns and heavy bullets. Current S&W internal parts are of lower quality too, though I think any problems encountered are likely due to poor assembly.

I think the most production revolvers come from Ruger. I do not know about Chiappa. They may be very good. Taurus is improving their revolver internals, but Grant Cunningham thinks the quality is improving.

http://www.grantcunningham.com/blog_files/9327c0de843e9141d5f799a1f763031c-887.html

http://www.grantcunningham.com/blog_files/no_taurus_work.html

Take a look at the Ruger GP100 (357 Magnum) and Ruger Alaskan (44 Magnum). The GP100 is a very good revolver and has good support from holster and accessory manufacturers. You can even get a Safariland SLS holster for it. The Ruger Alaskan really shines with the 44 Special cartridge. You'll like it.

rha600
March 20, 2012, 07:11 AM
I've got a number of handguns I use for home defense. two are 9mm and one is a S&W 686. One thing I would check, and this is more of a nice to know factor, but are the walls between the units concrete block or just 2x4s and sheet rock? At the very least if they are concrete block you have a little more security.

Also, Rule #3 is to know your target AND WHAT'S BEHIND IT. Doesn't matter if it's a miss or over penetration you need to make sure you're not shooting into another room or worse, another home. I have a bit of a break here as due to hurricanes our homes are all built with concrete block walls, however we still have windows and doors (although the manufacture claims these are bulletproof up to a 9mm, I'm not testing it) that I need to be sure of.

There is a web site, maybe someone here can help out, called the truth about guns, or box of truth. Something like that where the guy does actual tests. If I remember correctly, a 12ga with bird shot gave the best chance of NOT penetrating more than 1 or 2 sheets of sheet rock. Keep in mine each wall has two sheets.

tomrkba
March 20, 2012, 08:21 AM
The whole overpenetration argument is tiresome. It's popular because it's based upon liability for government agencies.

If it won't go through drywall, it won't penetrate flesh and bone adequately. It's simply a fact of life until they invent the energy pistol.

The best you can do is focus upon marksmanship and tactics.

rha600
March 20, 2012, 08:32 AM
what exactly won't go through drywall or flesh? I'm a little confused.

C.M.Burns
March 20, 2012, 08:53 AM
@tomrkba "It's popular because it's based upon liability for government agencies." I don't know what you meant by this, but it's "popular" because I don't want to hurt anyone else if I have to discharge a firearm that is not invading my home.

rha600
March 20, 2012, 09:05 AM
exactly.

and with a 357mag or 44mag there is a very good chance of it.

tomrkba
March 20, 2012, 10:31 AM
Well, then put the gun down and call 911 because you're not preparing yourself for the realities of fighting. You're not going to find effective ammunition that will stop an attacker as quickly as possible that will not penetrate drywall. Missing shots is a reality and it's going to happen unless you are very, very lucky. As a fencing instructor told me: "Don't think, fight!" All you're doing is piling on garbage that will hurt your performance.

The only action you can take is to attempt to direct the fire by changing the angle at which you are shooting. Bad guys, unfortunately, don't stand still. They run around and shoot back. So you'll have to deal with all that. In the end, you won't be thinking about liability but will be concentrating on killing the goblin. What do you do if the goblin moves such that the backstop is possibly an unsafe direction (from the bystander's point of view)? Bullets are coming at you, so you better be moving, shooting, and/or behind cover. Are you going to wait or take the shot? If you think too much, you're likely to take a bullet.

You will find that your accuracy drops by a stunningly high percentage when both you and the target move. This happens in training; I expect the hit rate to drop when under the influence of adrenaline. Find a range that will allow you to move and shoot. You can setup a simple moving target with 100 feet of rope, two pins, a four wheel stand, 2 1x2" sticks and an IDPA target. Have a friend pull the rope to make the target move left and right randomly. The ground will cause the target to sway back and forth. Move while you are shooting. Try it from different angles and positions. Hitting is very difficult. However, you will improve as you do it.

Go read Guns, Bullets and Gunfights by Jim Cirillo to find out what happens to the brain and mind during a fight. He discusses the actual thought process, at least in his experience. Search out Jack Leuba (Failure2Stop) on m4carbine.net. Attend his classes and ask him about fights and what he did. Attend Craig Douglas' ECQC course. The reality of this will hit you in the gut like you wouldn't believe (Craig will make it happen--physically and emotionally). You'll feel like barfing long after some guy puts a knee into your stomach, knocks you to the ground, and starts smashing your Simunitions pistol into your bubble helmet. You'll find these guys have a very different mentality than the one frequently seen on gun forums.

rha600
March 21, 2012, 06:20 AM
I'm still a little confused by your posts, but that's ok, it's early.


I will say, that not every encounter is going to result in a gun fight. BG breaks into your house at 2:00am, you are in your bedroom. You grab your .357 magnum, get down on the opposite side of the bed as the door to your room and get on the phone with 911. We'll assume that sometime in the next 5 minutes the cops actually do show up, but in the mean time you have the gun on that entrance to the room in case the BG comes through it. IF he even does have a gun, what are the chances of a gun fight?


There have been quite a few shootings down here in FL of people breaking into homes and the owners shooting them. I haven't seen one yet in the last 6-12 months that was a gun fight. just simply the owner shooting the intruder.


One nice thing about down here is we don't have winter, so you can choose something like a .38 special or 380 and not have to worry about it going through 5 inches of thick winter clothing. most intruders will be in shorts and a tank top even if it's January, which means less chance of over penetration, and more control of the weapon.

tomrkba
March 21, 2012, 08:09 PM
what are the chances of a gun fight?

That is impossible to know from the perspective of the bad guy. What you will know is:

- Someone is in your house
- You can see a gun in their hand
- You didn't let them in or you heard and/or saw them break in
- You do not know their mindset or intent to engage in a fight.

You do know they have illegally entered your home with a weapon. Why have they entered your home with a weapon? Do they intend to use it? They brought it, so it's likely they'll use it. What are the odds you'll shoot? I know what my response would be, but the thread is not about me.

According to Analysis of Five Years of Armed Encounters (With Data Tables) (http://gunssavelives.net/self-defense/analysis-of-five-years-of-armed-encounters-with-data-tables/), 52% of encounters occurred in the home. What I talked about before is about the skills you'll need to cover 95% of situations you'll encounter (the other 5% are unknowns, so you'll just have to fight through it).

If you're still confused, then put the gun away and go get some training on mindset.

Buckeye!
March 21, 2012, 10:53 PM
http://onfinite.com/libraries/1722490/267.jpg

A revolver is a great choice, a 357 /38 spl. is a great choice ,a Ruger is the top choice.....

rha600
March 22, 2012, 07:06 AM
That is impossible to know from the perspective of the bad guy. What you will know is:

- Someone is in your house
- You can see a gun in their hand
- You didn't let them in or you heard and/or saw them break in
- You do not know their mindset or intent to engage in a fight.

You do know they have illegally entered your home with a weapon. Why have they entered your home with a weapon? Do they intend to use it? They brought it, so it's likely they'll use it. What are the odds you'll shoot? I know what my response would be, but the thread is not about me.

According to Analysis of Five Years of Armed Encounters (With Data Tables) [gunssavelives.net] , 52% of encounters occurred in the home. What I talked about before is about the skills you'll need to cover 95% of situations you'll encounter (the other 5% are unknowns, so you'll just have to fight through it).

If you're still confused, then put the gun away and go get some training on mindset.

your posts are random at best, that's why they are confusing.

Also, you know what that link doesn't show. How many of the intruders were armed. Interesting is that the average number of shots fired was 2.2 which seems pretty low for a "gun fight". A gun fight to me is two people fighting it out with guns, not one person shooting an unarmed intruder. 2.2 shots fired seems more like a "shooting" than a "gun fight".

So, as everyone here has said:

Have a plan.
Stick to it.
If you can hold up in a room (with your weapon) and call 911.
Know your target.


You may see the guy with the gun, but if you go out there to confront him, is there anther guy you DIDN'T see with a gun with him? That would depend on the design of your home obviously. In my home there could easily be someone behind a wall that I can't see. If you live in a studio apartment I guess it would be a little easier to see.


Oh, and btw, birdshot will easily penetrate flesh but not easily go through a wall. depends of course on distance but inside a normal house it typically will only go through one sheet of drywall.

tomrkba
March 22, 2012, 08:01 PM
your posts are random at best, that's why they are confusing.

That's because you're entirely focused upon part of the equation. The overpenetration issue is just a small part and understanding requires a wider discussion of the topic. It's blown out of proportion to the point that people get wrapped up in liability issues when they need to take action.

Oh, and btw, birdshot will easily penetrate flesh but not easily go through a wall.

Not to the depth necessary for quick incapacitation. I'm not saying it won't stop the fight (talk about a bad hospital visit), but it's not going to have the penetration required to get to organs through the torso or bone. If you want to use birdshot, great. I'll stick to buckshot and slugs.

I prefer to think about effective practice rather than get all wrapped up with liability. I have a lawyer who is paid to do that for me. You cannot win in court if you don't win the fight. Misses are going to happen; it's a fact that bad guys aren't going to stand around and allow good guys to shoot them. Newbies have enough trouble with trigger control, balancing pressure in the hands, lining up sights and managing recoil. They need to master these while learning tactics. I guess it's easier to talk about liability than it is to go into a detailed tactics discussion.

HALL,AUSTIN
April 5, 2012, 07:51 PM
#2 shot drops coyotes so I dont see a reason it wouldnt do the same to a person, with proper shot placement. Neck, leg, near the armpit. These are places with HUGE ammounts of arteries/veins. All it takes is one.

Deja vu
April 5, 2012, 08:31 PM
I would go with a 45 Colt. A 44 special may be a good choice too (from a 44 magnum revolver)

plenty effective and not as loud as a 44 mag or a 357 magnum.

This is coming from a 357 magnum fan boy.


but for me I would go with a shot gun. I like 00buck but there are several options. I load my 870 with Winchester PDX1 12. It is a slug with a bit of buck shot. But out here we are just as likely to have a 4 legged predator break in as the two legged type. Closest neighbors are about 3.5 miles away. The police are 20 min away on a good day. :(

silvermane_1
April 7, 2012, 04:22 AM
IMHO forget a pistol as your first option, go with a nice 12 gauge 18in pump with birdshot ammo, it the best bet for cqc/hd option with neighbors being so close.

tomrkba
April 7, 2012, 09:37 AM
IMHO forget a pistol as your first option, go with a nice 12 gauge 18in pump with birdshot ammo, it the best bet for cqc/hd option with neighbors being so close.

This is terrible advice.

1) Birdshot does not penetrate deeply enough to get to most internal organs unless you hit the eyes. The goal is to stop the attack as quickly as possible. The only way to do that is to cause severe damage, not superficial wounds.

2) Shotguns require training just as handguns do. Running the gun involves more than loading and working the action. It's a skill that requires constant practice.

3) Shotguns are not easily carried around the house and yard. A handgun can be on the belt at all times (openly or concealed). Home invasions typically go very quickly and what you have on your belt is likely all you have to solve the problem. You may be able to make your way to a long gun or safe room, but do not count upon luck.

4) This response demonstrates incorrect mindset. Placing overpenetration over survival is typical poor "group think" based upon law enforcement objectives (keep the officers working and avoid lawsuits). You should be thinking about winning the fight, not about what the lawyers are going to do. Don't catch a bullet or two because thinking about court caused you to hesitate. Instead, good tactics will win the battle and avoid hitting the neighbors. Again, training is required to learn these skills.

By all means keep a shotgun loaded with defensive loads. "Defense in depth" is more effective. However, a handgun on the belt allows you to respond immediately to a lethal force situation.

Flopsweat
April 10, 2012, 11:31 AM
I'm always dismayed at the number of people who honestly think that birdshot is a suitable home defense round. Sure, it may work some of the time, kinda. Would you hunt deer with birdshot? Birdshot will hurt a bad guy. It may scare the bad guy. It will not reliably stop a bad guy, especially one who is determined and/or high. You might have reasonable results at very close range - close enough to, say, grab a barrel from someone. Buckshot will slow considerably after two layers of drywall, which is the best you can hope for in any effective defensive round.

From Box O' Truth:

Birdshot as a Defense Load
I have had a lot of questions, summed up as follows: How effective is birdshot (#4, #6, #8, etc.) as a defense load?

We have done tests with various birdshot loads. Birdshot penetrated through two pieces of drywall (representing one wall) and was stopped in the paper on the front of the second wall. The problem with birdshot is that it does not penetrate enough to be effective as a defense round. Birdshot is designed to bring down little birds.

...

In fact, tests have shown that even #4 Buckshot lacks the necessary penetration to reach the vital organs. Only 0 Buck, 00 Buck, and 000 Buck penetrate enough to reach the vital organs.

...

More here: http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/bot3.htm

Colorado Redneck
April 10, 2012, 07:54 PM
The point is, if somebody does break into your home, it would be very likely that person would know how to do it without arousing the inhabitants by making racket. Otherwise, things are going to happen that will ruin several people's evening, yours included. Holes in the walls, blood on the floor, the cops, maybe a corpse, being questioned, maybe being hauled in an ambulance or worse, a hearse.

Keeping your home secured is the number one course of action. Have motion detector lights outside. A big can of bear mace at the head of the bed. Know what you are going to do if you hear stuff going on. And a gun you are very familiar with and the determination to use it.

And maybe a dog that will bark and let you know stuff is going on. (Dog is better than gun in my estimation.)

For John Q Public to engage in gun fight training and be successful in a home entry is pretty much a dream. Some will do it, think about it all the time, mentally rehearse how to nail Mr. Bad Guy. The rest of us go to sleep at night thinking about the next fishing trip.

There hasn't been forced home entry for a year in this town. Last one was drug related. Before that it was several years. Is it worth it to get all bushy tailed over a .000001 chance some bad guy is going to break into my house? Just my $0.02

Bullrock
April 12, 2012, 06:18 PM
I miss my Ruger GP 3"....intellectualizing war games to the point of 100 "what ifs" leaves me with a huge headache :eek: If you've never been there, you'll never know what you'll do until you have. Time for the Sox...anyway :)

Guy B. Meredith
April 13, 2012, 02:05 AM
I don't know the rules in your area, but it is common for the police to put a firearm used in a shooting in the evidence locker. You may or may not get it back in some areas. For this reason I prefer to use a cheapo gun, which the 627 is not unless you get in a drawing like I did.

I go with a 12 GA pump shotgun and keep the nice stuff for the range.

ClydeFrog
April 14, 2012, 01:47 AM
I read over the last few posts in the topic.
I strongly agree that a 3" or 4" barrel N frame .44 with some factory .44spl JHPs or a well made frangible(MagSafe, Glaser Safety Slug) could work well in a home protection set-up.
The large muzzle aimed at a home-breaker's face may be a useful deterent. ;)
As I've posted in other forum topics, I highly disagree with shotguns or SBSs(short barrel shotguns). The blast, noise, recoil etc would be hard factors to address. Weapon retention or security are issues too. There is a short clip on YouTube that explains these points in detail.
A revolver or pistol can be re-holstered but a small rifle or 12ga is still fully loaded & ready to be used quickly in a CQB event by a violent subject.

CF

Guy B. Meredith
April 14, 2012, 02:25 AM
Clydefrog, could you expand on that and post a link to the video? I don't have enough information from your post to understand what the issues are.

I am not worried about blast or anything else from the shotgun in home defense. Any firearm will produce blast and flash--particularly revolvers with the BC gap adding to the excitement.

I would not consider it wise to allow an intruder to come within reach. Pulling the trigger is probably the best method of weapon retention.

In my case, I feel a long gun is easier to steady and aim when the adrenaline is over the top.