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View Full Version : Do you wear ear plugs while hunting?


ftballgod
January 25, 2012, 11:30 AM
This came up in conversation between some friends and I yesterday. I have never worn ear plugs while hunting. I was always taught not to so you could hear possible game coming your way. given the fact you are only going to shoot a handful of times at max it would not matter as much.

My friend however said I was crazy not to wear hearing protection while shooting. He says he will not pull the trigger without some sort of protection.

Over the years I have hunted with rifles and shotguns. All of which I have fired with no problem. With the limited amount of shots and the adrenaline flowing my ears have been fine. This year was different. I tried deer hunting with my new 44mag. After taking 2 shots back to back my ears started ringing and did so for a few days.

After that I think I might use plugs from now on with the handgun. And only go without when using the long guns.

Now back to the question. Do you use plugs?

Brian Pfleuger
January 25, 2012, 11:35 AM
It is foolish to fire any gun without hearing protection but I also did it for years before I knew better.

It doesn't matter if you notice any ringing or not. Loud noises damage your hearing.

With the technology available today, at the price it's available for, there is no reason to not wear hearing protection while hunting.

I have a pair of electronic muffs that actually HELP me hear while hunting and still shield my ears from the blast. They cost $29 and work surprisingly well.

On the top end, you have products like Walkers Game Ear "hearing aid" style protection that even have built in radio capability. They run into the $500 range or more.

Yes, wear protection. Yes, make it electronic. There really is no excuse.

musher
January 25, 2012, 11:50 AM
I wear a pair of the earplugs on a headband things. Wear them around my neck until ready to take a shot, then I put them in my ears.

Where I hunt, I've never had to take a snap shot, always had time to put on my plugs.

I've tried the electronic muffs, but didn't think the advantages were worth the hassle.

chewie146
January 25, 2012, 12:41 PM
It depends. Some may argue with me, but with low-volume shooting, such as elk, it's rare. With squirrels and shotguns, varmint hunting, and if I ever find my butt in a tree stand, I definitely do. If I'm walking through the woods with a .22, I usually don't.

huntinaz
January 25, 2012, 01:20 PM
Historically no, but I may start. My AR is just too loud and I only use it for predators so I may bring my electronic muffs. For some bird hunts too, I should start.

With the technology available today, at the price it's available for, there is no reason to not wear hearing protection while hunting.

I have a pair of electronic muffs that actually HELP me hear while hunting and still shield my ears from the blast. They cost $29 and work surprisingly well.

On the top end, you have products like Walkers Game Ear "hearing aid" style protection that even have built in radio capability. They run into the $500 range or more.




I would argue that bulkiness and the hassle of carrying another item are too two good reasons not to wear hearing protection. For big game I need to hear so ear plugs are out, and I'm not going to wear a set of muffs all day. The walker Game ear at $500 is not for everybody although it would be a smart way to go. The noise does damage your hearing, no doubt about it.

For once or twice a year during big game hunts, I'll take the damage like most people do. Not the best for your ears, but really not the end of the world.

joseywales87
January 25, 2012, 01:23 PM
I never wear ear plugs when I hunt. Its usually a one shot, one kill type thing. One shot without plugs doesn't bother me.

Brian Pfleuger
January 25, 2012, 01:28 PM
I wear a pair of the earplugs on a headband things. Wear them around my neck until ready to take a shot, then I put them in my ears.

Where I hunt, I've never had to take a snap shot, always had time to put on my plugs.

I've tried the electronic muffs, but didn't think the advantages were worth the hassle.

To each his own, I suppose. Personally, I would find having to put muffs on and off to be far more of a hassle than putting them on and leaving them there. Besides, if you hunt in the cold you need something over your ears anyway.

I would argue that bulkiness and the hassle of carrying another item are too two good reasons not to wear hearing protection. For big game I need to hear so ear plugs are out, and I'm not going to wear a set of muffs all day.

Again, to each his own. I don't personally see any problem with bulkiness or hassle, since I'm not "carrying" them, I'm WEARING them.

Plus, you don't have to wear them all day, necessarily. If they bother your ears you can always take them off for awhile. They've never bothered me and I've worn them for up to 6 hours at a time. My uncle has reported some soreness from a pair that he wears so I understand it varies a bit.

Also, the $500 Walker's are only an example of the highest of the high end. Very similar "hearing aid" style products are available for for less money. Probably under $100

Brian Pfleuger
January 25, 2012, 01:30 PM
I wear a pair of the earplugs on a headband things. Wear them around my neck until ready to take a shot, then I put them in my ears.

Where I hunt, I've never had to take a snap shot, always had time to put on my plugs.

I've tried the electronic muffs, but didn't think the advantages were worth the hassle.

To each his own, I suppose. Personally, I would find having to put muffs on and off to be far more of a hassle than putting them on and leaving them there. Besides, if you hunt in the cold you need something over your ears anyway.



I would argue that bulkiness and the hassle of carrying another item are too two good reasons not to wear hearing protection. For big game I need to hear so ear plugs are out, and I'm not going to wear a set of muffs all day.

Again, to each his own. I don't personally see any problem with bulkiness or hassle, since I'm not "carrying" them, I'm WEARING them.

Plus, you don't have to wear them all day, necessarily. If they bother your ears you can always take them off for awhile. They've never bothered me and I've worn them for up to 6 hours at a time. My uncle has reported some soreness from a pair that he wears so I understand it varies a bit.

Also, the $500 Walker's are only an example of the highest of the high end. Very similar "hearing aid" style products are available for for less money. Probably under $100

mdd
January 25, 2012, 01:45 PM
My hearing is much more important to me than a successful hunt. I wear earplugs every time I pull the trigger....even with the little 22. You can do as you please because it won't be my ears that get damaged. My old man shot skeet for years, hunted all the time, and shot targets frequently with his rifles. He just spent three grand on hearing aids because he could barely participate in a conversation anymore due to his hearing loss. I love to hunt and shoot as much as he did but I choose to not go deaf from my hobby.

rickyrick
January 25, 2012, 01:46 PM
I don't.

But everybody should.

No real excuse not to, really.


Peetza posted twice for the hard-of-reading. LOL

jmr40
January 25, 2012, 01:46 PM
Shooting and hearing loss is like taking a 1,000 mile journey. Every time you pull the trigger on a gun it is like taking 1 more step on that 1000 mile journey toward deafness. Wearing hearing protection will still damage your hearing, you are just taking tiny baby steps each time you fire your gun. The louder the gun, with, or without protection, means you are running faster towards deafness.

I'll soon be 54, didn't start wearing any hearing protection until I was in my early 30's. As part of my job before retiring I was required to get a complete physical including a comprehensive hearing test each August. I have had about a 10% hearing loss in my left ear for 30 years, most likely from firing guns with no protection. My right ear, the one farthest from muzzle blast as a right handed shooter was perfect. That is the bad news. The good news is that it has zero effect on my ability to hear anything. I hear normal everyday stuff as good as anybody. What it means is that there are certain tones, that I simply cannot hear at all. If I worked as a musician, or taught music lessons it might be a handicap.

Since my 30's, I've worn protection whenever practical. At the range, always. When dove hunting where I know I'll be shooting, and shooting a lot, yes. For big game hunting, when I'll likely never fire more than 1-2 shots in an entire season, and when I really need to hear to locate game, never.

There is more to my story, but I've got errands to run. Will come back later with another post.

rickyrick
January 25, 2012, 01:47 PM
I do wearem when target shooting or plinking

nmg
January 25, 2012, 01:52 PM
Nothing is worth damaging my hearing, not even a 12 point buck. Once it's gone, you never get it back. Hearing aids aren't the same.

lefteye
January 25, 2012, 01:54 PM
The most expensive hearing protection costs much less than my hearing aids - I wish I had known that about 55 years ago.

Single Six
January 25, 2012, 01:57 PM
I haven't hunted in a long time, but when I do, I always wear hearing protection. Keeping my hearing matters more to me than possibly not hearing a deer approach.

FrankenMauser
January 25, 2012, 02:32 PM
It depends. Some may argue with me, but with low-volume shooting, such as elk, it's rare. With squirrels and shotguns, varmint hunting, and if I ever find my butt in a tree stand, I definitely do. If I'm walking through the woods with a .22, I usually don't.

That pretty much sums it up for me.


And, on a separate note:
If you scroll through this thread and pay attention to where people live, in relation to their preference for hearing protection, you'll notice a trend:
Most of us "out West" don't do it. For 90% (or more) of our hunting situations, we have to remain mobile and we need to hear.
But, members in the Midwest and 'back East' tend to wear protection, because the hunting is more sedentary.
It's a whole lot easier to deal with extra gear when you're sitting in a blind or a stand, than when you're humping that gear on top of a 10,000+ ft mountain ridge. (I know. I've done both.)


For me, it's a trade off:
Am I willing to potentially slightly damage my hearing*, in exchange for comfort and a more successful hunt? About 95% of the time, the answer is 'yes'. The other 5% of the time, I have ear plugs with me, and I have time to put them in before I fire a shot.

If I'm not hunting, I always wear protection. Usually, I double up with plugs and muffs.


*The amount of damage caused by a single shot or set of 2 shots, while hunting, is debatable. I've read several studies that discuss the thresholds for permanent damage, the recovery periods required to prevent damage ("healing" over night, for example), and the opinions of many auditory specialists on the matter. Even the "experts" can't agree that 1-2 shots on a big game hunt will cause any permanent hearing loss, unless you have a pre-existing condition. Until I find an article with a definitive answer, I'll have to keep deciding. That may never happen, though. We all know that hunting locales and conditions vary wildly across the U.S. The potential for hearing damage in a tight grove of aspen trees is far greater than the potential in an open corn field.

huntinaz
January 25, 2012, 02:59 PM
^^^^^^

Exactly. I agree that wearing ears is great if you want to do it, but often times it is more trouble than it's worth in my opinion. For my applications, anyway.

I think a game-ear type product is probably a very smart thing to do, and would be a good thing to look into.

Doyle
January 25, 2012, 04:20 PM
I personally wouldn't mind springing for a nice pair of combo enhancement/safety ear muffs if it wasn' so darned hot where I hunt. Any muffs at all and your ears will just sweat off except on the rare days when the temperature actually drops to "hunting weather". It is 80 degrees this afternoon and it's Jan 25th.

I would love to have the in-the-ear Game Ear alternative, but I just can't afford to drop $500 like that. It seems like someone would come up with a cheaper alternative. Heck, I'd be happy if they would come up with an affordable in-the-ear hearing protection without any enhancement. They make muffs with that feature - why not ear buds?

Brian Pfleuger
January 25, 2012, 04:22 PM
I would love to have the in-the-ear Game Ear alternative, but I just can't afford to drop $500 like that. It seems like someone would come up with a cheaper alternative. Heck, I'd be happy if they would come up with an affordable in-the-ear hearing protection without any enhancement. They make muffs with that feature - why not ear buds?

There are a number of in the ear options for far less than $500. I bought a set several years ago made by Radians that are "Behind the Ear" hearing aid style that were like $40 on eBay. Retail price is much higher but they're on eBay cheap all the time.

They look like this:

http://lh3.googleusercontent.com/public/lM2dDF7cGl1Gfyw7R-qLMSBUb-uTB5U1jqDTa6Mih8n45l7G8N1lrqhdzsp-x30HZvan8bnS3eq11fSAxu-sArPz8aYyuGkHtAfqmCSWO6tcr75esh4EhkPTb06alnyJC90BSlQPR_HC=s90-c

huntinaz
January 25, 2012, 04:37 PM
There are a number of in the ear options for far less than $500. I bought a set several years ago made by Radians that are "Behind the Ear" hearing aid style that were like $40 on eBay. Retail price is much higher but they're on eBay cheap all the time.

They look like this:

You like them? Are they holding up?

Brian Pfleuger
January 25, 2012, 04:47 PM
They've held up fine but I don't like the ear plug part very much. It's soft plastic and feels funny in my ear especially when I'm sweaty, which is when I don't want the muffs. I very much prefer the foam ear plug style that Walkers uses on their similar product. I have considered looking for a way to retrofit the Radians unit with a Walkers style plug but I've never gotten around to it. Usually when I hunt in warm weather (woodchucks) I just wear plugs and take one out if I want to talk.

warbirdlover
January 25, 2012, 04:58 PM
I don't wear formal hearing protection but wear $5,000 hearing aides that "cut out" when the sound is too loud. So in effect I'm wearing hearing protection....

I think the Walker Game Ears and similar work like this...

BTW, my hearing loss did not come from shooting guns or listening to loud music. I had a form of arthritis in my spine years ago and the only drug (Indocin) that would "reach" it and keep me from being crippled causes the little hairs in your ears to "die" in 1% of the users. I was one of them. It was lose my hearing or walk in my old age all bent up. Not a good choice.

I hope those young people that wear hearing protection during hunting also take care when listening to music in their cars. When this young generation gets my age there's going to be a hearing loss epidemic! Being deaf I hear their music when they're a block away with the car windows closed! :eek:

Just don't tell the wolves and cougar on our leased land that I can't hear them sneaking up behind me or I'll be an easy meal for them!! :D

Dr. Strangelove
January 25, 2012, 05:31 PM
While deer hunting? No.

Target shooting, skeet, pistol range, plinking with a .22lr, sure.

If I duck hunted or dove hunted, or anywhere I might fire or hear fired multiple shots, sure.

Cowboy_mo
January 25, 2012, 06:59 PM
Two years ago I developed tinnitus and it definitely isn't fun. The ENT doc told me that I have some hearing loss and that the tinnitus would never go away.

When target shooting, we have always used hearing protection but never used anything while hunting. I don't totally blame the shooting because like many I have worked in noisy factories and used chain saws and other equipment without hearing protection until about 10 years ago.

My Walker's muffs improve my hearing of game while hunting and protect my ears when it is time to shoot. They also make excellent ear warmers when hunting during the winter:D

rickyrick
January 25, 2012, 07:01 PM
90% of my hunting successes are because I heard the animal coming, 97% of my hunting is at night. Pigs and varmints.

I have always had excellent hearing, so, I may not have noticed any damage done by hunting without hearing protection.

I use my hearing to my advantage and position myself near hay covered ground or other such items.

I am grateful for the fact that my hearing is still good. I have always been exposed to high noise industrial environments plus several years in the army.
I would be terrified you hunt in the dark with bad hearing.

Brian Pfleuger
January 25, 2012, 07:09 PM
90% of my hunting successes are because I heard the animal coming,...

You should love electronic protection then, because you can hear BETTER than without protection!

arch308
January 25, 2012, 07:23 PM
I hate to admit it but no, I don't wear protection while deer hunting. 90% of my hunting is from enclosed box blinds where the barrel sticks out the window which shields me from alot of the blast. One or two shots like that a year aren't worth worring about. But when target shooting or plinking I can't stand to be without my ear covers! OUCH!

doofus47
January 26, 2012, 02:25 PM
I think that FrankenMauser is generally correct, and as a western guy, I've generally not worn ear protection while still hunting--although I wear plugs/muffs when doing pretty much anything but cleaning my firearms.

However, I am definitely in the market for the ear protection such as outlined by Peetzakilla. Apparently, this year was a tipping point. I took only 2 un-filtered shots to fill my buck tag, but my ears have had low-level ringing ever since. I'm still about 3 decades out from reaching life expectancy age, and I plan on hearing my grand kids laughing at me. Lesson learned: I'm going to be wearing protection from now on.

4winds
January 26, 2012, 06:15 PM
Thinking about buying these:

http://www.electronic-hearing-protection.com/product_info.php?products_id=100

Seems like a good deal and may have to save the pennies. My buddy is deaf in one ear and it sucks for him.

Don't know why, but people seem to be really nasty to folks who can't hear very well until they find out their condition...after the fact.:confused:

WWWJD
January 26, 2012, 07:06 PM
These are the best shooting earplugs I've ever had:

Radians Cease Fire (http://www.sportsmanswarehouse.com/sportsmans/Radians-Cease-Fire-Ear-Plugs/productDetail/Plugs/prod72998/cat100421)

So far, these are the only ones I've seen like this; they suppress the high dB impulse noise from firing, and like advertised, hearing everything else doesn't seem to be effected as much as with the foamies. They're not real comfortable without a little trimming. I've never owned a pair of actives.

I didn't wear any this last season, but.. I'm only firing one round for the day too. My .308 was surprisingly quiet, so I don't worry about it. Marlin 60 is quite; .22 Mag Chuckster is a bit much, and the 625 revolver? Might as well gouge your ears with a pencil. .40 M&P is about the same. I wouldn't dare shoot my pistols without for sure!

Brian Pfleuger
January 26, 2012, 07:18 PM
The Noise Reduction Rating on those things is 7db.... in gunshot terms, that's virtually like wearing nothing at all.

Firearms can routinely reach 140 db and as high as 160 or more. Damage begins slightly north of 85db.

Reducing even a "quiet" gun shot of 130 db to 123 db is (almost) irrelevant.

Fact is, even the best devices only drop the sound from VERY damaging to SLIGHTLY damaging but.... those things have a baffled hole in them. They really don't do much at all.

Double Naught Spy
January 26, 2012, 07:25 PM
Electronic muffs are terrific, especially this time of year when it is cold. They help me hear better AND keep my ears warmer!

BIG P
January 26, 2012, 08:56 PM
I use game ears or plugs always,but most of my shots are beyound hearing range anyway,powerlines cutovers,open fields.

Kreyzhorse
January 26, 2012, 09:04 PM
I don't wear them while hunting but I do wear them every time I'm shooting.

I understand that one rifle shot a year will certainly damage my hearing to some extent, but I prefer to hear the woods.

phil mcwilliam
January 26, 2012, 09:46 PM
I wear hearing protection when shooting at a rifle range or even sighting in at a make-shift farm range. I don't wear hearing protection when hunting. My hunting rifles are not that loud when compared to others. I've hunted with "borrowed" rifles fitted with muzzle brakes & I would definately recommend hearing protection when hunting with such rifles. I even once owned a S&W 629 in 44 magnum that was as loud as a rifle with a muzzle brake. I was happy getting rid of the 44 magnum, as I considered regular use would deteriorate may hearing.

hogdogs
January 26, 2012, 10:00 PM
Nawwww... Shucks... the ringin' in my ears muffles the gunfire...
:o:D:mad::cool:

Brent

Keg
January 26, 2012, 10:47 PM
Nope....

WWWJD
January 26, 2012, 11:10 PM
peetzakilla: The Noise Reduction Rating on those things is 7db.... in gunshot terms, that's virtually like wearing nothing at all.

By the numbers, 7 doesn't sound like much. But based on experience and a bit of dabbling in sound testing at work, you have to understand that the NRR values are weighted, and based on a broad spectrum sound measurement. These play fair with everyone else by providing a NRR rating. From 20Hz to 20,000Hz, the overall reduction may only be 7, but in the range that matters as pertains to a muzzle blast, they work pretty darn good! I'm not playing favoritism... just think you might be surprised. I was. :)

Brian Pfleuger
January 26, 2012, 11:15 PM
Well, I have a pair made by another company. In my experience, they seem to muffle speech and do little or nothing for muzzle blast.
Somewhat subjective I suppose.
IMO, nothing compares to a good set of electronic muffs, with plugs underneath for really loud guns.

NESHOOTER
January 26, 2012, 11:54 PM
I never wear them I just shoot suppressed.... damping gameear for turkeys.

natman
January 27, 2012, 05:04 AM
I use a set of these (http://www.amazon.com/Peltor-97044-Tactical-Hearing-Protector/dp/B00009363P/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1327658578&sr=8-1). Properly adjusted, there's no problem hearing or locating sounds. After a while you forget you have them on.

Won't hunt without them. Tinnitus never stops.

deerslayer303
January 27, 2012, 06:29 AM
I have to admit I don't wear protection while deer hunting, but I do wear them for dove hunting, shooting, etc. And I know I should, been listening to jet engines for 15 years, and early in my career (read young snot nosed kid) I didn't wear anything, but now I wear DOUBLE hearing protection at work. I am interested in getting a set of the muffs like the above post, and heck another thing is I bet they help keep your ears warm also.

Double Naught Spy
January 27, 2012, 07:55 AM
I wear hearing protection when shooting at a rifle range or even sighting in at a make-shift farm range. I don't wear hearing protection when hunting. My hunting rifles are not that loud when compared to others.

Your choice of rifles may not be as loud as some others, but unless you are shooting suppressed, virtually any centerfire hunting rifle is going to produce ear damaging noise.

rickyrick
January 27, 2012, 11:11 AM
Barrel length makes a huge difference.

Some ammo makes some difference too.

Surroundings........If you shoot across the bed of a pickup, you really need earplugs due to the sound bouncing off of the rear window.

Doyle
January 27, 2012, 11:57 AM
Surroundings........If you shoot across the bed of a pickup, you really need earplugs due to the sound bouncing off of the rear window.


Even worse if you shoot from inside the cab. :eek:

rickyrick
January 27, 2012, 12:00 PM
LOL

BUFF
January 27, 2012, 05:11 PM
I'll be 38 in March and I have to turn my head to the right sometimes when people talk to me. I never wore protection when I was a kid. Started wearing them in the military when we went to the range or on the flightline (turbine engines are LOUD!) I never used to wear them when I would hunt for the same reasons already listed. Then I started noticing hearing loss. Now I wear the game ears. They shut off when you shoot. Or foam ear plugs when I forget the electronic ones.

Never tried the muffs for hunting. Usually one shot one kill and I don't notice it.

tmlynch
January 27, 2012, 11:10 PM
Won't hunt without them. Tinnitus never stops.

I used to not be too picky about wearing ear protection while hunting, and I regret it. This past dove season I developed very noticeable tinnitus in my left ear following a shot from a partner 15 feet to my right. I intend to wear some sort of protection for every non-emergency shot for the rest of my life. The ringing on the left is unpleasant, and I don't want it to get worse, or start up on the other side.

You don't have to break the bank to do something about this. For a lot less than the electronic muffs linked above, you can get ear plugs with baffles (http://www.academy.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10151_10051_33453_-1?N=85400282). My birthday present this past year was fairly inexpensive electronic ear plugs that allowed me to hear pretty well while blocking loud noises.

Tom

L_Killkenny
January 28, 2012, 12:09 PM
Short answer, no. I've tried e-muffs and they're a pain in the butt while hunting.

Handguns are a differnet story. I would wear muffs or ear plugs while handgun hunting but then again that's the reason I no longer hunt with handguns.

Range or high volume shooting (doves) muffs and/or plugs with anything besides a .22lr rifle.

LK

Crankylove
January 28, 2012, 01:46 PM
I don't normally were ear protection while hunting big game.

I do pack a pair of ear plugs along while hunting big game in case I get a chance to set up a shot from my pistol, but that would really be the only time I wear any ear protection while hunting.

While target shooting, I always have plugs or muffs, or both. But, while hunting I like to be able to hear what is going on around me, and despite what some people will claim about the electronic ear muffs, I prefer my naked ears for hunting.

FrankenMauser
January 28, 2012, 02:56 PM
By the numbers, 7 doesn't sound like much. But based on experience and a bit of dabbling in sound testing at work, you have to understand that the NRR values are weighted, and based on a broad spectrum sound measurement. These play fair with everyone else by providing a NRR rating. From 20Hz to 20,000Hz, the overall reduction may only be 7, but in the range that matters as pertains to a muzzle blast, they work pretty darn good! I'm not playing favoritism... just think you might be surprised. I was.

Speaking of which...
Where can I find the standards and procedures for establishing the NPR rating?
I was trying to find some information last week, but couldn't find anything online.

HKGuns
January 28, 2012, 09:51 PM
No I do not. Half of the game in hunting is hearing what is coming or around you.

WWWJD
January 28, 2012, 11:59 PM
FrankenMauser: Speaking of which...
Where can I find the standards and procedures for establishing the NPR rating?
I was trying to find some information last week, but couldn't find anything online.

Most of that stuff stays buried in ISO standards; sometimes you can luck into finding copies of this stuff for free online. It does take some digging. One thing that you won't find much of is pertaining to sound quality; I think that generally speaking, a single dB rating across a broad spectrum is pointless. 6dB at 20Hz is nowhere near as noticeable as 6dB at 4kHz, which is right in the middle of our peak sensitivity. A weighting corrects for this, but it still doesn't quite get it right.

Here's some of them:

ISO 1999 (1990). Acoustics – Determination of occupational noise exposure and estimation of noise-induced hearing impairment.

ISO 11904-1 (2002). Acoustics – Determination of sound emission from sound sources placed close to the ear. Part 1: Technique using a microphone in the real ear (MIRE technique).

ISO 4869-1 (1990). Acoustics – Hearing protectors – Part 1: Subjective method for the measurement of sound attenuation.

ISO 4869-2 (1994). Acoustics – Hearing protectors – Part 2: Estimation of effective A-weighted sound pressure levels when hearing protectors are worn.

ISO TR 4869-3 (1989). Acoustics – Hearing protectors – Part 3: Simplified method for the measurement of insertion loss of ear-muff type protectors for quality inspection purposes.

ISO 4869-4 (1998). Acoustics – Hearing protectors – Part 4: Measurement of effective sound pressure levels for level-dependent sound restoration ear-muffs.

ISO/TR 3352 (1974). Acoustics – Assessment of noise with respect to its effect on the intelligibility of speech.

Deja vu
January 29, 2012, 10:40 AM
I currently do but to be honest I hate it. I all ways get a weird "plugged" feeling when I wear hearing protection. Its kind of like having a bad head cold.

I am looking in to suppressing one of my 45/70s and see if it can be hearing safe.

Brian Pfleuger
January 29, 2012, 10:55 AM
Yeah, I hate it too but I hate it less than the ringing in my ears that I'd REALLY hate if it got any worse. I just wish I'd known better 20 years ago. :(

RangerHAAF
January 29, 2012, 03:10 PM
No, I don't wear them when hunting; one or two shots don't bother me plus there's a bill currently in the GA legislature to allow people to use suppressors/silencers due to hearing loss considerations. The bill passed out of the house committee on Friday and passage in the senate looks good.

Dr. Strangelove
January 31, 2012, 06:48 PM
No, I don't wear them when hunting; one or two shots don't bother me plus there's a bill currently in the GA legislature to allow people to use suppressors/silencers due to hearing loss considerations. The bill passed out of the house committee on Friday and passage in the senate looks good.

The bill passed today, I'm kind of surprised the GA is in the forefront with this type of thing, but it's great news.

I wonder what this will do to the price of suppressors here in GA, something usable on a .270 or the like has been $800 - $1200 plus the $200 stamp.

It the price comes down to a more reasonable level, I'll certainly have one on my deer rifle.

RangerHAAF
January 31, 2012, 07:50 PM
It might create a new industry. From what I've seen it doesn't take a genius to make them.

Plus the Democrats don't really want to pick a fight about this or guns in general.

PoorRichRichard
February 2, 2012, 02:07 PM
Do I were ear protection while hunting? Depends what I'm hunting. I hunt quail and dove in relatively open canyon areas. I use light Wally World loads (6 to 8s) and I find that a don't need to cover my ears. However, while sitting in the duck blind, if I do not at least plug my left ear (I'm a right-handed shooter) after shooting off heavy 3" loads, I get an instant headache
accompanied by a ringing in my ears. Have yet to hunt deer, but my 30.06 and Mosin's are louder than my shotgun, so I will be protecting my eardrums while shooting these rifles.

"JJ"
February 3, 2012, 07:03 AM
Anytime there is a chance I may pull the trigger I have some form of hearing protection.
I guess it doesn't bother me too much because I have to wear them at work 100%.

I also shoot USPSA competitions where it is required.

While hunting I wear the $29 electronic muffs peetzakiller mentioned.
They magnify sounds below 85 db and shut off on any sound above.

http://i946.photobucket.com/albums/ad308/jdj85/Mobile%20Uploads/1277166563.jpg

Yes, in Summer they can get a bit warm and if they aren't sitting just right they will irritate my ears some after 4 or 5 hours!

BUT...
... after watching my Father, who NEVER wore any type of hearing protection while hunting or working, struggle to hear normal conversation, blast the volume on the TV or ask his Granddaughters "HUH" over and over, I can deal with hearing protection! :o

I work with a guy who has 95% hearing loss in one ear and 100% in the other! He fights with his hearing aids all the time. His loss was due to injury. But I can prevent my hobby from doing ANY damage to mine.

I choose to wear hearing protection some of the time now so I don't have to wear them all of the time later!!:D