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View Full Version : CCW Drivers, Protocol on a Traffic Stop


WildBill45
January 22, 2012, 09:58 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O1MF94CCBCQ


Be safe on Traffic Stops ... A cop's advice on keeping it safe.

This is the updated video...

m&p45acp10+1
January 22, 2012, 11:09 PM
I can not hear very well so I do not know if it was mentioned or not so I will Throw a bit in.

1 Have your liscense and carry permit ready to hand to the officer when they get to your car. They will ask for your liscense and insurance first thing in most cases. Hand them to the officer together. They will notice. Most will ask if you have your CCW weapon on your body, or in the car. Be honest, do not cause a scene. I assure you no matter how within your rights you are it will not go well for you at the time.

2 Have your insurance, and proof of registration somewhere you do not have to dig for them at. Most newer vehicles have a pouch in the viser. Use it if your vehicle has one. If not a viser wallet is cheap, and will hold it. If nothing else a rubber band will work. It makes cops nervous when people are digging in places where they can not see what is in your hand, or what will come out. If they see a gun in there, and your hand is there also, you will have thier gun in your face very quickly.

Kimbertron
January 23, 2012, 12:19 AM
It makes cops nervous when people are digging in places where they can not see what is in your hand, or what will come out. If they see a gun in there, and your hand is there also, you will have thier gun in your face very quickly.

This is why I keep my license and insurance papers in a pouch on my visor. I am also deaf and am very limited in my speech ability so i keep a card with those papers stating that i am carrying a concealed weapon and that i am deaf. I have only been pulled over twice in the last 6 years but it made the situation a lot simpler to have those things at hand in my visor.

ltc444
January 23, 2012, 12:40 AM
It continues to amaze me that a standard procedure has not been adopted by National Law Enforcement Standards.

Even the AZ DPS (state patrol), according to the Officers I have spoken do not have a procedure which they want followed.

My personal procedure is to hand my CCW and DL to the Officer when he asks for my DL. i then answer the Officers questions clearly and directly. I also keep my Insurance and Registration in a compartment which does not contain a firearm or ammunition. Before I open the compartment I tell the officer it does not contain any weapons.

Nothing is quite as stimulating to an Officer when a driver opens his glove compartment and a pistol falls out. (Personal experience while I was conducting a traffic stop)

MyGreenGuns
January 23, 2012, 01:14 AM
I also keep my Insurance and Registration in a compartment which does not contain a firearm or ammunition.
That is probably the smartest thing any of us can do. I keep my paperwork on the visor, plainly visible.

In WA you do not have to inform LEO you are carrying, unless they ask. Most of the time they do not ask.

Jeff22
January 23, 2012, 01:32 AM
We just got CCW (Finally!!) in Wisconsin back on November 1st.

The "official" state Dept of Justice CCW class recommends that if you're armed and you get stopped for a traffic violation, that you hand your CCW permit to the officer along with your driver's license and proof of insurance.

However, that is NOT required under Wisconsin law.

Speaking as a police officer, I wish that it was required.

Over the last few years, on vacation or at firearms instructor training classes I've talked a lot to cops from Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, and Florida. All states where CCW for private citizens has been legal for quite some time. And in each case every cop has emphasized CCW for private citizens has not been a problem. It's just a matter of people getting used to the idea, using a quality holster, concealing the gun properly, and knowing how to interact with law enforcement should that situation arise.

I wish there was a more standard procedure across the country, for the application process, for the training requirement, for the way the law is written, and for what CCW permit holders are required to do when contacted by law enforcement.

Nnobby45
January 23, 2012, 01:44 AM
Lot's of advice seems to be pretty general and doesn't necessarily apply everywhere.

I was stopped once, by Washoe Co. Sheriff, and the officer knew I had a CCW before he got out of his car----in Nevada, the dispather has that info instantly and informs the officer.

And I knew he knew it. By the time he reached my car, my window was down, hands on wheel, and I already had my wallet in my hand.

He asked me where my weapon was and I told him one was in the wasteband at 4:00 and the other in my inside vest pocket. He asked why I was so heavily armed, and I said I'm an 'ol retired geezer who's either getting parnanoid in his old age or smarter--didn't know which. He said "just asking".

At no time did he ask to see a permitt or a weapon.

He wanted my registration and I told him it was in the glove box. I asked for permission to reach in there and he asked if there was a gun in there. I said no and he said go ahead.

He asked why I was going so fast and I said I had no excuse---had my head where the sun didn't shine a whole lot.

He went back to his car, came back and said he was giving me a warning and told me to have a nice night. I said thank you and was on my way.

Laws are different in different places. If you're required to notify the officer of your weapon and show your permit, then do so.

If you're not required, and you just can't wait to let the officer know you're carrying, then go ahead. Doesn't seem to be a shortage of such "volunteers".

IMO, if your state is new to CCW, then use more co-operation and caution because LE isn't yet used to people like us carrying guns.

I think that if I had to reach into my coat for my license, because I wasn't astute enough to have it out already, then I'd let the officer know I'm legally armed and then ask him if I could reach in my pocket. As I said, he knows you're armed, and I don't know if they always ask first off where your weapon is. And, of course, never open the glove box (under any circumstances) if there's a weapon in there without first informing the officer and waiting for permission.

TeamSinglestack
January 23, 2012, 02:30 AM
We are required to inform here in the Republic.

When you get lit up, you have time to grab all your paperwork LONG before an LEO approaches, at least that has been my experience, so I get all that admin crap out as soon as I stop. As long as you can see the hands, "fidgeting" doesn't much matter prior to the approach.

My M.O.:

1. Stop as far off the road as possible. (safer for BOTH parties involved)
2. Hazards on.
3. Dome light on at night.
4. Keys out and on the dash in front of the steering wheel.
5. Grab all paperwork and place in one hand. (D.L., registration, insurance, CHL)
6. Window down, hands on steering wheel.
7. Remove any headgear and or sunglasses.
8. Wait for LEO.
9. After the LEO asks for all your admin crap, hand it to them, including the CHL and inform as follows: "For your situational awareness, and in accordance with state law, I am required to inform you that I am carrying a concealed firearm located (location)"

I've been pulled twice, and the LEO has NEVER asked to see the firearm, taken the firearm, OR issued a ticket. I had an electrical problem with one of my headlights, so maybe if I was speeding, it would have been different. Who knows.

YMMV.

Bailey Boat
January 23, 2012, 07:10 AM
I'm not sure that grabbing all the paperwork and moving around in the vehicle is such a good idea before you stop. As an ex Trooper the thing that made me most uncomfortable was a lot of movement in the vehicle after I hit the lights.

MyGreenGuns
January 23, 2012, 07:27 AM
I'm not sure that grabbing all the paperwork and moving around in the vehicle is such a good idea before you stop. As an ex Trooper the thing that made me most uncomfortable was a lot of movement in the vehicle after I hit the lights.

I agree. I had a friend that got his car searched quite often. I was riding with him one time. (He WAS speeding) LEO pulls in behind us and lights come on.

He started grabbing around in his center console and glovebox before the car was stopped.

"What are you doing?" I inquired.

"Getting my registration and insurance, DUHHHHH!"

"Dont you realize that HE (the officer) thinks you just stashed some drugs and grabbed a gun?!"

"I never thought about it like that."

WildBill45
January 23, 2012, 09:11 AM
Moving about is not good for most cops, as such movements to him or her is suspicious, as if you are trying to hide something, or prepare something ... both actions is not good!

The cop knows not if you are John Dillinger or the Pope; Mr. Drug Dealer or the soccer coach; or his girlfriend's husband or his mother-in-law. Stay still, keep your hands visible, preferably on the wheel, and be non-aggressive.

I wouldn't blurt out, "I GOT A GUN!" But if you must open that glovebox with a gun in it, then is the time to mention your CCW situation, etc... If it doesn't come up in states where it is not required then you may not say anything, your call on the feel of the situation but, remember rookie cops can overreact if they accidentally see a firearm near your hands!

If you do look like John Dillinger and have a violin case in the back seat, this may also be a good time to sort out the situation!:)

hangglider
January 23, 2012, 12:20 PM
I've often wondered about this point of when and what "volunteering" the info on conceal carry. My likely course of action would be to immediately advise if I had a CCW permit and whether or not a weapon is present--regardless of the circumstances for being pulled over. My guess is if they do a background check and find you have a CCW permit but didn't volunteer the info up front--that may arouse suspicion and potentially lead to God-knows what.

WildBill45
January 23, 2012, 12:26 PM
I had to put this video on privacy until i can edit it later. Some personal information can be veiwed as it is of the driver...

I will attend to that after work hours today! Thank you!

hangglider
January 23, 2012, 12:34 PM
I thought about that when you/other guy flashed IDs! :eek:

brickeyee
January 23, 2012, 01:01 PM
No duty to inform in Virginia, and (at least for the state police) the CHP is linked to you if they care to look after getting the license plate in your name.

The state police get five dollars from every CHP license to run the data base.
http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+cod+18.2-308

The court shall issue the permit and notify the State Police of the issuance of the permit within 45 days of receipt of the completed application unless it is determined that the applicant is disqualified.


The State Police may charge a fee not to exceed $5 to cover their costs associated with processing the application.

The State Police shall enter the permittee's name and description in the Virginia Criminal Information Network so that the permit's existence and current status will be made known to law-enforcement personnel accessing the Network for investigative purposes.

hangglider
January 23, 2012, 03:11 PM
I've had police tell me it's a good idea to inform even if not required. Hard for me to see a downside to this.

aarondhgraham
January 23, 2012, 03:18 PM
I have my Insurance papers and license out before he get to my car,,,
I hand him both my license and CWL when he asks for the license.

I was stopped about 3 months ago,,,
I had a tail light out.

When I handed the cop my CWL,,,
He asked me "What's this? I didn't ask for this."

Go figure.

I was polite & he was polite,,,
I got a warning to go fix it immediately.

He never mentioned my handgun.

Aarond

farmerboy
January 23, 2012, 03:58 PM
I personally would also rather a driver to sit still and wait upon me to ask for Id or not to instead of a driver being so prompt to have it waiting or either scurrying to retrieve it when Im making my way to their vehicle. To me it looks strange for a driver to have everything in hand like theyve been pulled over so many times they done got this down to an art or either they believe they can retrieve everything before I get there but they cant and when you get there they are digging in console or glove box and my gun is on hand watching in hopes they are retriving drivers info and insurance and youve got to knock on window and advise to roll down window. If maybe youre thinking warning, it doesnt look good at this point. Relax, wait for officer with window rolled down, light on preferably, hands to be seen and wait on instructions with good attitude. Nothing more.

kinggabby
January 23, 2012, 04:04 PM
I don't blurt out I have a gun. I just grab it wave it around and say officer wanna see the gun I am carrying today? Actually I would not do that. Good advice here thanks for posting it.

aarondhgraham
January 23, 2012, 04:09 PM
To me it looks strange for a driver to have everything in hand like theyve been pulled over so many times they done got this down to an art...

Seriously?,,,

Aarond

hangglider
January 23, 2012, 04:13 PM
Hmmm--I didn't mean to suggest I would blurt everything out to the police before they got a word out--but that if I was stopped, approached and asked "May I please see your driver's license and registration (and insurance)" I would say something along the lines of "Yes officer, right away, and please be advised that I have a concealed carry permit and do presently have a weapon in the glove compartment." I would think that would be the kind of thing most officers would want to know right up front. I assume there are some police on this forum--is that a bad thing in any way?

farmerboy
January 23, 2012, 04:23 PM
Perfect hang glider

farmerboy
January 23, 2012, 06:06 PM
Just to know, for you drivers who always have everything ready for the officer and waiting do you also have a jack right beside you always too in case of a flat you can stop the vehicle, jump out and have tire changed in under two minutes like a pitt crew.? You know, how some people are always prepared for everything. I think if it were me, I rather plan on not getting stopped in the first place. Just me I guess

WildBill45
January 23, 2012, 08:19 PM
This is the edited video ... editing the exposed personal information of the driver ... out of view.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O1MF94CCBCQ

I also changed the lead post as well...

farmerboy
January 23, 2012, 11:51 PM
driver and cop both did great.

garryc
January 24, 2012, 01:12 AM
That might get you arrested in Ohio. You are required to inform immediately. I've heard that 50 seconds will get you hung. After the Canton cop thing, yell it out if you have to no matter what the cop says.

MyGreenGuns
January 24, 2012, 05:45 AM
I've had police tell me it's a good idea to inform even if not required. Hard for me to see a downside to this.Most of the time there is NO downside. Around here there are a LOT of younger LEO, they tend to make me nervous after I inform them about my weapon. I never say anything unless they ask.

To me it looks strange for a driver to have everything in hand like theyve been pulled over so many times they done got this down to an artI've actually been complimented for having everything ready.

I think if it were me, I rather plan on not getting stopped in the first place.Thats my game plan, but it doesnt work too well when quota time comes. I know a few of the LEOs by first name now. They're just doing their jobs.

Coach Z
January 24, 2012, 07:10 AM
I'm of the mindset that the more information the officer has the better. Pull over, car off, interior lights on windows open and hands open and on steering wheel. Hi I'm officer X with such and such. Hi I just want to let you know that I have a concealed carry permit and I have it on me, or in the vehicle whatever the case may be. I recall a video by Mossad Ayoob mentioning that it's not a great idea to just blurt out I have a gun. Every time I've been pulled over and do these things it has immediately changed the tone of the conversation and the officer has been much more comfortable as well as I haven't gotten any tickets while carrying!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

hangglider
January 24, 2012, 09:18 AM
I can't even remember the last time I was pulled over individually--but where I live in the south it's fairly common to encounter roadblock sobriety checkpoints and "dragnet" roadside inspections where everyone is stopped that just happens to be passing by.

farmerboy
January 24, 2012, 10:35 AM
I don't know where you live hangglider but here in Texas that use to be a thing, now it's a no-no.

brickeyee
January 24, 2012, 12:43 PM
I've had police tell me it's a good idea to inform even if not required. Hard for me to see a downside to this.

What police might want and what they can require are not always the same thing.

How is your CHP relevant to a traffic stop?

Though I have seen plenty of folks saying it got them off from a ticket.

WildBill45
January 24, 2012, 07:35 PM
The driver in the video is a Long-in-the-tooth truck driver; he has his stuff organized from habit. Doing so make it quicker and less stressful than searching through the glove box and/or center console looking like you don't know what you are doing. This makes the officer stressed, having folks digging through hidden and hard to see areas.

I personally get stopped very rarely, and I mean very rarely ... I drive safe, at least when I am not on my motorcycle and even then most of the time ... but I keep my license, insurance, and permit all in my badge case ready to go!

It also helps if you make a big BOO-BOO and are lying in pain on a stretcher. The paramedics can find your stuff quickly, notify your wife quicker, so she can cash in your life insurance, and her new boyfriend can buy a new Corvette, which she wouldn't let YOU BUY!:eek:

farmerboy
January 26, 2012, 01:00 PM
the one that you couldnt buy. hehe

Rj1972
January 26, 2012, 01:10 PM
I just take it for granted that someone would have to show their registration or insurance. In Texas it's now online and available to the officer. If you try to give them your insurance card, they've told me they don't need it. Basically you just hand them your Drivers License. You are required to inform. So I just hand them both over. The one thing I noticed about the video though was that it appeared that he didn't turn off the car. I thought that was preferred (car off, keys on dashboard is how I do it).

zxcvbob
January 26, 2012, 01:37 PM
I think that if I had to reach into my coat for my license, because I wasn't astute enough to have it out already, then I'd let the officer know I'm legally armed and then ask him if I could reach in my pocket.

I do my rummaging around and reaching in pockets after I pull over and before the cop even gets out of his car. I get my wallet and proof of insurance out and put them on the dash, then my hands on the steering-wheel and wait for the officer to get there. If I was pulled over at night, I would turn the dome light on first.

farmerboy
January 26, 2012, 02:45 PM
Rj1972, yep there are alot of things that are preferred but very seldom all or some are done. As an officer you just have to deal with what you recieve or what you can get. Sure I would like every stop to be step 1, 2 and 3 and on down the line but sometimes they are so far from that either but a driver not knowing,didnt get the e-mail or plainly just trying to be stupid and alot of times ****** at the stop and seeing how far they can get by with stuff. Tea, like that always works out in their favor! By really sometimes there are officers who my opinion are really nervous are even scared sometimes and let people go just because they dont want to deal with certain individuals.

ronto
January 26, 2012, 03:57 PM
Never been stopped, but I would shut off the engine put the keys on the dash and keep my hands in plain sight at the 10 and 2 o'clock position on the steering wheel and wait for instructions from the LEO...Not a good idea to be moving around in the car opening the glove box, reaching under the seat, etc...A BG will kill you with his hands and it's critical to let the LEO know where yours are.

m&p45acp10+1
January 26, 2012, 06:51 PM
I know a whole lot of police officers, and have more than a coupler that are family members. They all recomend having everthing where you can get to it without digging for it. If you have a CCW hand it over on top of the drivers liscense, and make sure you have the proof of insurance handy.

When the LEO gets to the vehicle keep your hands visable, do not make sudden moves, make sure the vehicle is in park, with the ignition turned off, keep your seatbelt buckled, and on properly unless asked to step out of the vehicle. Never get out of the vehicle unless the officer tells you to do so.

Regardless of if you have a CCW or not the above paragraph is a recoemendation to avoid a lot of problems for you, and the LEO.

WildBill45
January 27, 2012, 11:55 AM
The one thing I noticed about the video though was that it appeared that he didn't turn off the car. I thought that was preferred (car off, keys on dashboard is how I do it).

I don't think there is anything wrong that but not necessary in most cases. If he thinks you are unsafe, because such is the reason he stopped for in the first place; DUI, Reckless, Wanted, etc, then YES he will ask to turn off your vehicle. He is now thinking about a possible arrest, and wants the vehicle off, and you out of the vehicle shortly.

Kimbertron
January 27, 2012, 09:19 PM
The one thing I noticed about the video though was that it appeared that he didn't turn off the car.

I have only been pulled over twice and both times it was in the winter. Up here I think they understand if you keep the car running when its -30 lol.

catnphx
January 27, 2012, 11:35 PM
Every state is different but in Arizona ...

... the law does not require you to inform an Officer you have a permit/license to carry if approached by that Officer on any type of official business.


Also in Arizona ...

... if an Officer Ask if you have a firearm by law you must give the Officer an answer.

WyMark
January 28, 2012, 08:53 PM
Here in Wyoming there's no duty to inform, but when they pull up your plate it lists the registered primary driver, and GUN: Y or N, based on if you are a CCW holder.

Neven
January 31, 2012, 03:32 AM
In Missouri when your drivers license is checked, the concealed carry should come up. It should.

m&p45acp10+1
February 2, 2012, 06:38 PM
The thing is in Texas it is not uncommo for a police officer to ask if you have a concealed handgun in the car. There is no liscence requirment to carry in the car, so some people have a loaded concealed handgun in the car that do not have a CHL. It is perfectly leagal provided that it is concealed.

Most cops I know will ask that question quickly.

Marie13
February 4, 2012, 07:53 PM
I'm not sure that grabbing all the paperwork and moving around in the vehicle is such a good idea before you stop. As an ex Trooper the thing that made me most uncomfortable was a lot of movement in the vehicle after I hit the lights.

I'm in NE IL (moved here from suburban Detroit back in early '96). When I first moved here, I was living on the NW side of Chicago. One morning on the way to work, I was stopped for allegedly not fully stopping at a stop sign. Now, mind you, I was driving a Ford Escort, no gang banger car. Two cops came at me, one on each side of my car, guns halfway out of their holsters. What seemed so threatening to them, I've no clue. I'm a short white female and was alone in the car. They got real antsy when I went to get my proof of insurance (in IL, you have to show proof of insurance along with DL when cops pull you over) out of the glove box.

The last time I got stopped in the NW suburbs (where I now live) a few years ago, it was for a tail light I didn't know was out. I rolled down my window and then put my hands very visibly on steering wheel. When the officer came to my window, I asked him if I could get DL out of my purse and insurance card out of glove box.

The officer told me he appreciated me asking, rather than just going for my documents.

Justice06RR
February 4, 2012, 08:15 PM
It continues to amaze me that a standard procedure has not been adopted by National Law Enforcement Standards.

Even the AZ DPS (state patrol), according to the Officers I have spoken do not have a procedure which they want followed.

My personal procedure is to hand my CCW and DL to the Officer when he asks for my DL. i then answer the Officers questions clearly and directly. I also keep my Insurance and Registration in a compartment which does not contain a firearm or ammunition. Before I open the compartment I tell the officer it does not contain any weapons.

Nothing is quite as stimulating to an Officer when a driver opens his glove compartment and a pistol falls out. (Personal experience while I was conducting a traffic stop)

There is not SOP because each state has different laws. Some states like FL you are not required to inform the LEO, but its a courtesy (and would be a smart thing to do.)

I've never shown my CWL permit unless asked. Some cops don't ever care as long as you're cooperative and don't give them a reason to be suspicious.

Merad
February 12, 2012, 07:47 PM
NC requires you to inform. I think I'd do it even if it was optional.

bikerbill
February 18, 2012, 04:28 PM
Agree about standard procedure and wish there was one ...

Been stopped twice since last summer and I did the same thing in both cases ...

An Arkansas trooper stopped my wife and I on a vacation trip to Branson, MO in a rented car ... kept my hands on the wheel, when he got to the window, I told him I had a Texas CHL and was armed ... he asked for my license and CHL and asked me where the gun was .. told him it was in a holster in the door pocket, he told me to leave it there and to exit the car ... then things got a little weird, at least from my point of view ... he asked if he could pat me down; I said sure, advising him there was a pocket knife clipped to my pants pocket ... then he sat me down in the cruiser, told me he'd pulled me over for allowing my right front wheel to cross the curbside white line (on an interstate) ... then he proceeded to talk to me about guns, asked what I was carrying and whether it would make a good backup ... let me go with a warning ...

The second time was in my little dinky town in TX, pulled over by a constable for not having a front plate on the car ... same routine, never asked to see the gun, gave me a fix-it, which I did the next day ...

In both cases, I kept my hands in sight and did not start reaching for my wallet until he had asked for my papers and could see what I was doing ... both were educational and sort of entertaining since I didn't get ticketed in either case ... my advice is don't fumble around for your papers until the officer asks for them and can watch you doing it, and tell him or her when they get to the window that you are legally armed if you are ... I understand the law may not require notification; I just do automatically as a courtesy .. LEOs have a tough enough job dealing with people on the wrong side of the law; anything you can do to ease their minds when they approach your vehicle is a plus in my mind ...

farmerboy
February 18, 2012, 05:02 PM
Bikerbill glad it worked out for you. I wouldn't think strange, when I pull people over sometimes I ask about weapons sometimes I don't but if you do get out or I have pc for search. First thing is a pat down and with legit people I like to discuss their guns as well. I am a gun nut and it gets lonely out there in the wee hours by yourself. Plus one for getting info after being asked instead of Johnny on the spot. Hate to see people fumbling around at three in the morning and I might ask for insurance, I might not. I might pull over driver for swerving, talk to them to find out they're sleepy, seems legit. Don't need info in every stop. Coutesy will take someone so far.

WildBill45
April 2, 2012, 09:05 PM
I might pull over driver for swerving, talk to them to find out they're sleepy, seems legit. Don't need info in every stop. Coutesy will take someone so far.

You are right on point with that one brother!

There are too many variables to have one protocol as a nation wide mandate. Each state and city has different Politics, leaders, and points of view. Common sense use to be common, but today it appears to be rare!

Remember if you are stopped: YOU KNOW YOU ARE A NICE GUY ... THE COP DOESN'T KNOW YET, SO ACT ACCORDINGLY!

ltc444
April 3, 2012, 08:11 PM
I think I know the stretch of road you were traveling. The trooper was looking for DUI. Those guys up in NW AR are generally good guys.

Bel5191
April 3, 2012, 08:53 PM
Anyone know what the regs are in PA?

WildBill45
April 4, 2012, 08:44 AM
http://articles.philly.com/2012-03-08/news/31136029_1_open-carry-constitutional-rights-city

A lot of cops are not up on carry gun laws, as you can see above! They purposely put such at the bottom of the training list in my opinion...

WildBill45
April 4, 2012, 08:50 AM
Safety and Law Enforcement Officers


For the safety of our Law Enforcement Officers and the aversion of embarrassing situations, please remember these important tips:
When dealing with Law Enforcement Officers, always inform the officer immediately that you are carrying a weapon and keep your hands in plain sight.
If carrying concealed and you are pulled over on a traffic stop, again, immediately inform the officer and keep both hands on the steering wheel and in plain sight.

http://www.ccpa.net/index.aspx?NID=3094

WildBill45
April 4, 2012, 08:54 AM
Re: announcing you are carrying concealed to a police officer during a traffic stop?
i don't feel like looking up threads, but DON'T tell the officer you are carrying unless you feel he is likely to see your weapon! here in PA, we have NO obligation to inform police of our carry, and doing so unnecessarily is likely to cause problems for you.

This is from a Pa website if that helps:

http://forum.pafoa.org/concealed-carry-145/110541-announcing-you-carrying-concealed-police-officer-during-traffic-stop.html

zxcvbob
April 4, 2012, 09:09 AM
WidBill, there doesn't seem to be a consensus ;)

WildBill45
April 4, 2012, 09:20 AM
WidBill, there doesn't seem to be a consensus

No there isn't, but good sense and good tips can help!;)

brickeyee
April 4, 2012, 02:27 PM
For the safety of our Law Enforcement Officers and the aversion of embarrassing situations, please remember these important tips:
When dealing with Law Enforcement Officers, always inform the officer immediately that you are carrying a weapon and keep your hands in plain sight.
If carrying concealed and you are pulled over on a traffic stop, again, immediately inform the officer and keep both hands on the steering wheel and in plain sight.

Your superiors have spoken.

Now obey their wishes.

zincwarrior
April 4, 2012, 03:26 PM
Re: announcing you are carrying concealed to a police officer during a traffic stop?
i don't feel like looking up threads, but DON'T tell the officer you are carrying unless you feel he is likely to see your weapon! here in PA, we have NO obligation to inform police of our carry, and doing so unnecessarily is likely to cause problems for you.

This is from a Pa website if that helps:

http://forum.pafoa.org/concealed-car...ffic-stop.html

interesting. In Texas you are required to inform the officer, else its a crime (misdemeanor though I think). I think you have to actually present your CHL license at the same time. Further, in Texas, when they run your driver's license the CHL will come up.

brickeyee
April 6, 2012, 10:54 AM
In Texas you are required to inform the officer, else its a crime (misdemeanor though I think). I think you have to actually present your CHL license at the same time. Further, in Texas, when they run your driver's license the CHL will come up.

You MUST know the laws of the jurisdiction you are carrying in.

In states you are not required to notify, it may (or may not) be in your best interest to notify.

A simple traffic stop for a headlight or illegal turn might NOT be cause to notify.

More significant things might be.

Even the police try to imply you MUST notify in a state it is not required in, just be polite.

While irritating a cop is not a crime, they CAN make your day difficult.

BlueTrain
April 6, 2012, 11:51 AM
Remember, James, you have a permit to carry a gun; not to disobey the traffic regulations.

Besides, you might get strip searched, too.

m&p45acp10+1
April 8, 2012, 11:31 AM
In Texas on a traffic stop it is advisable if you are carrying to inform the officer. Also note that in Texas it is legal to carry concealed in your car, going from your home to your car, and going into and from your place of buisness without having a CHL. I just hand the officer my CHL on top of my drivers License. They notice it, and ask "do you have your gun on you." I respond with "yes it is (where ever it is) how would you like to proceed?"

So far every time was uneventful. None of them were harassing. Most oogled my guns. All of them seemed to drool over a couple of my guns. More than one local has come to the range to shoot some of mine when I invited them to come and shoot my guns on my dime.

masotti
April 8, 2012, 07:00 PM
Here in Washington State, it is my understanding that if you are carrying you hand over your both your drivers license and your concealed carry license at the same time. That is why I keep them both in my wallet. Difference between me and others is I only ride a motorcycle. So I am always carrying concealed.

FTG-05
April 9, 2012, 10:41 AM
Alabama is a "must inform if asked" state. Hence, if and when pulled over by an LEO, he will get the usual DL, registration and insurance, all ready before he gets to my window, and that's it. He has no business knowing if I have a cell phone, tools, spare parts, ham radio or a firearm in my vehicle - it's simply none of his business.

The only exceptions are if he asks or asks me to step out of the vehicle.

Willie Sutton
April 10, 2012, 09:31 PM
It comes to mind that a useful resource would be to include the requirement or non-requirement for advising LEO's when stopped in any of the recoprocity resources, IE: the online resources published both privately, and by many of the states that issue CCW's. What is the norm in Florida (no need to tell) would be a felony in Ohio. What other landmines might be waiting to biter someone carrying thru a state with rules different than home?

Willie


>

tom49
April 10, 2012, 10:25 PM
this is michigan law.. An individual licensed to carry a concealed pistol who is stopped by a police officer (traffic stop or otherwise) while in possession of a pistol shall immediately disclose to the police officer that he or she is carrying a concealed pistol either on their person or in their motor vehicle.

Failure to disclose this information to a police officer carries the following penalties:

First offense = State Civil Infraction - $500 fine and 6-month CPL license suspension.
Second offense = State Civil Infraction - $1000 fine and CPL license revocation.

An individual licensed to carry a concealed pistol shall have the license in his or her possession at all times he or she is carrying a concealed pistol.

Failure to possess CPL license when carrying a concealed pistol is a State Civil Infraction and a $100.00 fine.

GregInAtl
April 12, 2012, 02:32 PM
In Georgia you do not have to have a ccw to have a handgun in your car. However, you do have to be eligible to obtain a ccw, even if you don't have one, to transport a handgun in your car. My understanding is (I was told by a police officer) that, if eligible, you can have a handgun anywhere in your car in the open or hidden, it doesn't matter.

Before the law was amended recently, you had to have the gun in the open (like laying on the seat) if you didn't have a ccw.

Somebody correct me if I'm wrong. I do know the law has changed recently, please verify before commenting.

Constantine
April 16, 2012, 02:01 AM
Usually never goes that casually. -__-

WildBill45
May 4, 2012, 06:53 PM
Usually never goes that casually. -__-

Neither does calculus, but you train that way and then think on your feet ... you can never cover all circumstances or "What If's" just make thinking and fighting men out of boys and let them play is my technique!

Denezin
May 4, 2012, 07:08 PM
Im not a ccw permit holder but here in NC open carry is legal in your vehicle. So i keep it on the seat beside me. Now the times ive been stopped at dui road blocks i put it on the dash where its extremely visible. And when i roll up i always told him first so he knew it was there loaded etc. never once had a problem or a time when they took the firearm to check it. Honest truely is the best policy.

dstryr
May 4, 2012, 10:07 PM
I recently bought my first pistol and keep it in my truck most of the time. I have not been pulled over in several years but one thing that seems to always put an officer at ease is having all my windows down, interior lights all on if at night and wait with hands on the wheel until I am addressed.

Tinted windows are difficult to see through day or night. In my mind, I'd appreciate being able to see into a vehicle much more easily. I usually get nailed for speed, I'm the guy doing everything I can to get out of the redneck nascar pack of highway/interstate drivers. It is true, there is safety in numbers, except on the road..:D. If I do get pulled over, my plan is to present both DL and permit and go from there.

1911Alaska
May 5, 2012, 03:26 AM
Here in Alaska, as many of you may know. We do not need a concealed carry license. If you are 21 you can carry a concealed weapon with no issues. It doesn't have to be in your name. If someone wants to, they can get a Concealed Carry License but like I said it is not required. Even though I will be getting one in June after i turn 21.
Here in Alaska the law is weird. You have to be 21 to buy a handgun and to buy handgun ammo. But if somebody over 21 buys one, they can legally sell it to you if you are over 18 or give it to you as a gift, even though you are not 21. And if you are over 18 but not 21 yet, you are allowed to carry one with you. But you must open carry it.

Only requirement here is, you must immediately tell the officer that you have a weapon in the car. If you do not, it is a misdemeanor I believe.

Lambdebois
May 27, 2012, 01:03 AM
The instructor at the class I took advised us to wait until the officer walks up before we dig around for anything for reasons mentioned above. When he does get to the window. Simply say " Officer. I want to let you know that I am a licensed CCW holder and I do have a *firearm* on me. What would you like me to do?"

He told us he would HIGHLY recomend NOT using the word gun. His feelings were that the word gun was something that is what an officer hears and will yell when a bad guy has a gun or something bad to alert other officers. That it can almost set off alarm bells.... Where the word firearm may simply be a better choice.

zxcvbob
May 27, 2012, 02:14 PM
I drive fast but pretty careful. So I get speeding tickets about once every 10 years (used to be a lot more frequently when I was much younger.) My last one was a year ago, and I was carrying.

After we both pulled over and before the deputy got out of his car, I got my wallet out of my back pocket and put it on the dash, and grabbed the registration and insurance papers from behind the visor. Then I rolled my window down halfway and waited with both hands on the wheel. If this had been at night, I would have done the same thing except first would have turned the dome light on.

I never did tell him I was armed because he never asked me to get out of the truck nor anything where I'd have to move around and maybe expose it. It's not required here, so why add unnecessary complications to things? If I had to get out or go dig for something, I would've handed him my license to carry first. (don't say the word "gun". "Firearm" or "weapon" might be OK but I prefer to let him see my goodguy card first)

chucknbach
May 27, 2012, 06:46 PM
Nothing is quite as stimulating to an Officer when a driver opens his glove compartment and a pistol falls out. (Personal experience while I was conducting a traffic stop)

If this was about 10 to 11 years ago on the I-10 in Phoenix. Green Honda Accord and you checked me for tattoos cuz someone was using my identity in California. That was me. Sorry forgot it was in there.:o The wife's car my truck had a flat that morning.

If'n I were a cop the only gun I think I'd be worried about would be the one in someones hand and if I've made it to the window I would feel safe from the more dangerous ones.

I personally don't think it's anybodies business if you have a gun in the car. As long as you don't open the glove compartment with a gun in there right in front of him.:o If an officer shows up at your front door do you tell him you have guns in the house?

Lambdebois
May 27, 2012, 07:04 PM
I can not speak for why he said that.

But to me... It seemed his reasoning may have been that police officers jobs are hard enough, it shows courtesy that you understand they have to risk their lives and deal with people potentially about to shoot them every time they make a traffic stop. It's always a risk for them. Some police officers may not care. But I think his feeling may have been that some would appreciate you letting them know.

I like the idea of waiting for the officer before you start digging around for things. That or keeping any documents you might need in a visible place like the visor as some have mentioned. I can sure see many reasons how a stop with someone digging around places they can't see could make an officer quite uneasy.

I read this somewhere on another site and saved it because I think it is good advice in general...

"While it's true that officers are accustomed to seeing drivers reach around inside a vehicle, it's still a bad idea. Virtually all such moves can constitute "furtive movement."*
Consider that you never really know why you were stopped. Even if you were speeding, or whatever, to assume that's the reason for the stop is not smart."