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pax
December 30, 2011, 10:46 AM
First, the story: Victim's final minutes caught on store surveillance (www.wistv.com/story/16407832/victims-final-minutes-caught-on-store-surveillance). Read this first! I started to quote from the linked story, but you really need to read the whole thing. You can also read the reactions of her family and friends, and a few more details at this link. (www.wistv.com/story/16397347/man-in-custody-after-leading-deputies-to-body)

What happened: Hope Melton, a 30 year old woman, was kidnapped, sexually assaulted, and murdered by a man who had followed her for several miles at least. He apparently forced her car off the road to kidnap her.

When she became aware that the man was following her, she called her grandmother on her cell phone and said she was being followed. The grandmother told her to come straight to grandma's house and not to stop for anything or anyone. She never made it.

So, tactics and training:

If you received a frantic phone call from someone you love who was in a situation like this, what would you advise her to do? What questions would you ask and what would you do with the information?

Keep in mind, the victim was unarmed. Also, here's a link to the Google map (http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Jefferson,+SC&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=0x8855b9e77d5cf399:0x63945904b751b89c,Jefferson,+SC&gl=us&ei=kdv9TpnPFsPugge4m-zFBA&sa=X&oi=geocode_result&ct=image&resnum=2&ved=0CC4Q8gEwAQ) of the area where her assailant apparently began following her. It's very rural. I would reasonably believe that a law enforcement response would take some time to arrive.

Thank God at least some good came out of her senseless death: the local sheriff announced he was holding a free class for women who wanted to get their carry permits, and the class filled within minutes of his announcement. (www.wistv.com/story/16406148/sheriff-waives-fee-for-womens-cwp-class-in-response-to-murder) Other women are also learning to shoot (www2.counton2.com/news/2011/dec/29/violence-against-women-have-somel-ladies-headed-gu-ar-2952663/?mid=5672) in response to the news. How horrible, though, that the victim couldn't defend herself when she needed it most. It would be much better if she were among the millions of people who have defended themselves with firearms and never made the headlines.

Her assailant didn't have a gun, by the way. He didn't need one.

pax

Doc Intrepid
December 30, 2011, 11:02 AM
Occasionally in life you may find yourself in a situation with few good options available to you.

The woman was clearly trying to flee in her car and her adversary forced her vehicle off the road.

After being run off the road, locking the doors won't stop someone from coming through the windows with a bat or a rock for that matter. Pepper spray may be of value, but one of its primary benefits is to allow the victim to flee on foot. In a remote rural area you have to ponder how far the victim could run before being overtaken by a (now enraged) pursuer.

Sometimes only a pistol in your purse or on your person is going to even the odds....regretably.

MTT TL
December 30, 2011, 11:08 AM
If you received a frantic phone call from someone you love who was in a situation like this, what would you advise her to do? What questions would you ask and what would you do with the information?

I'd call the police on my other phone and start getting as many details about the follower as possible. Eventually the police would call her and make direct contact with her and they would direct her the best place to go so they could make a stop. You might think that that might not happen. But in my area it actually would.

I'd tell her not to stop even if he hit her car (especially if he hit her car). If it were my wife she would be armed, but hopefully now ready too. There are no front lic plates in our state but she could at least pass a vic description.

pax
December 30, 2011, 11:08 AM
Doc,

All true, so sadly true.

So what would you tell your wife or your daughter if she called you in a situation like this? What advice would you give her? What questions would you ask and what would you do with the information?

pax

besafe2
December 30, 2011, 11:23 AM
While this isn't real far away from where I am, I'm not familiar with the area. With that said I would've never advised her to come home but to head to the nearest open business or the nearest law enforcement agency after having called 911. IMO this young lady should've called 911 first.

This is so sad & I don't like quarterbacking this but had she called 911 first the out come may have been different.

farmerboy
December 30, 2011, 11:33 AM
I would of had her to call 911 also, don't stop unless a open business, police Dept or maybe a man outside his home. But so many of these cases would have different outcomes if people would arm themselves and defend it if threatened. But like so many others I know, they go day to day unarmed and think they'll call 911 if needed. How Sad!

pax
December 30, 2011, 11:47 AM
To answer my own questions (I live in a very rural area so this one strikes close to home):

1) I would find out exactly where she is. This would be my first priority, ahead of anything else. I would want to know the road, the mile marker, and the direction of travel.

2) My next question would be a description of the vehicle following her.

3) I would tell her not to stop for anything, especially not if he bumps into her.

4) I would tell her to honk and flash her lights at any vehicle she sees on the road, to follow any cars she can reasonably follow (again while honking and flashing lights), and to stop immediately at any house (or business, or farm, or whatever-it-is) if there are people outside. She needs witnesses, the more the better.

5) Because cell phone coverage is spotty to nonexistent in our area, I would not have access to a second phone line, nor would I have confidence that she could call 911 after she'd wasted her first call on me. Although I would rather keep her on the phone myself, for mutual comfort, I would hang up and call 911 with the information she'd given me. I would also direct her to do the same, but I would never assume she'd successfully done so.

6) Because we live in a very rural area and a "fast" police response would likely take 30 minutes or more, as soon as I'd called in and given the information to 911, I would drive toward the location she'd given me -- alerting whatever family, friends, neighbors I could think of who might do likewise from other directions.

pax

kraigwy
December 30, 2011, 11:53 AM
First off my wife carries, but lets assume she didn't.

I don't know the area in question, so I'll address it reference to the rural area I live in.

There are ranches and rural homes scattered through out the area. Wyoming people are Westerners, which means two things. They believe ladies are to be protected, and honored, and most have some sort of firearm or other.

So if I recieved such call from my wife, I would tell her to aim for the closest ranch house she sees, get on the horn and stay on it as she drives into the rancher's yard and he/she comes to their aid.

Chance are the bandit won't follow her into the yard. Besides the rancher, both cars are gonna be surrounded by a pack of dogs (seems to be a law here, ranchers or people who live in the country half to have at least three dogs running around their yard.)

Not perfect, (nothing is), but I think she'll have a better chance then waiting for me or the sheriff to come to her aid.

Having said that, way too many rural areas here don't have cell phone service (I don't in the canyon I live in), so I would insist wifey get a pistol/revovler and learn to use it. My wife has a CC permit, but they arn't required in this state to be able to carry.

I'm more concerned with my granddaughter, she turns 16 in Feb. and will have her license (although she drives quite a bit without one now).

I've pretty much given her a PPK, and work with her all the time. She can't carry legally, but I think she can keep a gun in her car with written permission from her guardian. We live on the state line, so I still have to research South Dakotas laws.

hangglider
December 30, 2011, 12:03 PM
This is terrible--so sorry to hear about that. : (

jimbob86
December 30, 2011, 12:21 PM
If you think someone is following you, why would you call Grandma? 911.

Drive somewhere there are witnesses.

If run off the road, stay in the car.

Above all, especially if you are female, and someone threatens you if you do not go with them, DO NOT GO WITH THEM. If they are going to kill you, make them do it right there, instead of someplace of their own choosing. There are things worse than death, because death will come anyway.

That said, even a .25Auto from inside a car beats a baseball bat from outside the car. Carry your guns, people.

pax
December 30, 2011, 12:29 PM
IMO this young lady should've called 911 first.
If you think someone is following you, why would you call Grandma? 911.

Yes, she should have called 911. She didn't.

It isn't likely that anyone reading this will ever be the unarmed victim being followed -- but every single one of us has unarmed relatives and friends who might call us in a moment of high stress and high danger.

If you receive that phone call, what would you say? How would you respond to the victim's plea for help?

That is the specific scenario I want to discuss in this thread. Not what the victim coulda-woulda-shoulda done, but what you would do as the person receiving such a phone call.

pax

kraigwy
December 30, 2011, 12:29 PM
If you think someone is following you, why would you call Grandma? 911.

Depends on the person, my granddauther could be surounded by the 82nd Abn Div, if threatened she'd still call grandpa for protection, she'd call grandma to get a hold of grandpa.

MLeake
December 30, 2011, 12:32 PM
Thanks, Pax.

My wife had said she'd get her permit once we moved to Missouri; she was still chagrined when I signed us up for a class on the 10th and 11th.

"Why do I need one?" was her lament.

I showed her your link and the article today. She's not so opposed, anymore, after picturing this woman knowing something bad was coming her way, and having no effective means to respond.

(Although, if somebody ran me off the road, if the car still worked, I'd try to run their butt over if I didn't have a gun and they were approaching.)

jimbob86
December 30, 2011, 12:45 PM
If you receive that phone call, what would you say? How would you respond to the victim's plea for help?

Call 911.

Drive somewhere there are witnesses.

If run off the road, stay in the car.

If they try to get you out of the car, SHOOT THEM until they stop.

Brian Pfleuger
December 30, 2011, 12:50 PM
One thing I would try to convey is that all the polite rules of society are out the window. Sometimes these things end up bad because the victim subconsciously thinks they can't "break the rules".

If your car goes off the road you don't stop until its disabled. Mailboxes, fences, sheep, run them over. Lay on the horn, nonstop. Run red lights if you can and have to... None of that matters right then.

The previous advice is good. Find people, don't stop. Get on with 911 if possible. Do whatever it takes to survive.

MTT TL
December 30, 2011, 01:08 PM
4) I would tell her to honk and flash her lights at any vehicle she sees on the road, to follow any cars she can reasonably follow (again while honking and flashing lights), and to stop immediately at any house (or business, or farm, or whatever-it-is) if there are people outside. She needs witnesses, the more the better.


That is sound advice when feasible. I would be worried about someone making a wrong interpretation however. Best case the bad guy takes off.

hangglider
December 30, 2011, 01:20 PM
The killer is probably a sociopathic predator--he probably knew all the odds for response times and how "gullible" his victim might be--maybe even knew her drive paths and behavior patterns. Somebody posted elsewhere on this forum about having a "network" of neighborhood safe houses and armed response friends. Not a bad idea--especially in rural and high crime areas. With so many cell phones and cars equipped with GPS units these days I figure there has to be a way to exploit the technologies for full-time tracking and emergency response.

kraigwy
December 30, 2011, 01:30 PM
Moved

jimbob86
December 30, 2011, 01:33 PM
Or I don't need it grandpa cause I have you.



Answer: "You will not always, as you have your own life, and are responsible for it- I can't be everywhere, all the time."

kraigwy
December 30, 2011, 01:55 PM
Answer: "You will not always, as you have your own life, and are responsible for it- I can't be everywhere, all the time."

Sounds good in theory, but it doesn't happen that way. Now with my granddaughter.

It happened to her. Wife and I were in Gillette, 80 miles away, Step daughter's boyfriend, was watching grandkids, gets drunk and suicidal. He loads the 4 kids into the truck and starts crashing into every thing in sight. GD gets her little brothers and sister out through the rear window of truck and flees with "sitter" who is staggering tries to catch them. GD takes her siblings to gas station and calls me. I'm heading for town but remember I'm 80 miles away. I tell her to call the police and in response I get is "no grandpa, please hurry".

What ended the situation was my wife grabbed the cell phone and tells GD "K****a, call the police, if you don't grandpa will end up in jail". That's the only way she could be convinced to call the police. All ended well, bad guy is still in jail.

Granted, its poor training on my part, she needs professional training, and now she is old enough, now comes the sales program to get Grandma, Step-Daughter and Granddaughter to agree to the ideal.

cptnugget
December 30, 2011, 02:08 PM
One thing I would try to convey is that all the polite rules of society are out the window. Sometimes these things end up bad because the victim subconsciously thinks they can't "break the rules".

This is a key point by peetzakilla. People often have a really hard time recognizing that what is happening right now is an emergency and it's time to act using the rules of an emergency. I am a novice to firearms and a newcomer to this column but have often involved myself in emergencies and taken action or caused others to take action when they didn't seem to realize an emergency was taking place. In our normal lives we don't live close to the edge of disaster and acting as if things are an emergency seems like an embarrassing overreaction. It takes a conscious effort to counter that thinking.

So the most important thing you can do for someone at the other end of that call (beyond the practical help pax suggested), I think, is to give them the social permission to act like a genuine emergency is taking place.

Ruthless4christ
December 30, 2011, 02:11 PM
if no gun in the car. call 911 and leave the phone on the seat so you can have both ahnds to drive. if the follower begins to get aggressive. YOU be the aggressor. try to run HIM off the road. make him rear end you, put it in reverse anything. Not sure what kind of car she had, but this kind of behavior is not expected from a victim, and a car (any car) is a deadly weapon, especially once HE gets out of HIS car.

pax
December 30, 2011, 02:13 PM
So the most important thing you can do for someone at the other end of that call (beyond the practical help pax suggested), I think, is to give them the social permission to act like a genuine emergency is taking place.

That. That is a truly brilliant way to frame it. Thanks. (Mind if I steal that phrase?)

An article that might help: http://www.corneredcat.com/Dying_of_Embarrassment/

pax

cptnugget
December 30, 2011, 02:34 PM
pax, that is an excellent article and yes, feel free to use that phrase.

Conn. Trooper
December 30, 2011, 04:38 PM
Call 911 immediately, you never know where an off duty cop, or game warden, tax agent, whoever, will be on the roads and listening to his radio.

I would tell them to "air bag" him if he tried to run them off the road. By that I mean stand on the brakes and/or take the car out of gear and crank the parking brake on (brake lights don't come on, and the car behind you doesn't see it coming). This will often disable the other vehicle by deploying the airbags, destroying the radiator, and most cars have a fuel cutoff switch that is impact activated.

I would also tell them to get some sort of weapon out of the car, nail file, tire wrench, hair spray as makeshift pepper spray, whatever. Use it. Stab him in the eyeball wth a nail file. The gloves are off.

ltc444
December 30, 2011, 05:05 PM
Finally concure with Conn. Good advice.

G1R2
December 30, 2011, 06:52 PM
I think a “situational awareness” course should be drilled into every school child.

I suspect most people are walking around without a clue about what is going on around them and the thought of carrying a firearm for protection is only for those paranoid gun people.

If you are about to die a violent death at the hands of others, I pray that your last thought isn’t “If I only had a firearm, I would survive this”. Be ARMED, it’s your constitutional right.

C0untZer0
December 30, 2011, 09:14 PM
I don't think I could get off the phone with them until I found out were loved one was at and where they were heading.

Then I would advise them to call 911

I would call 911 - give descriptions

I would grab my range bag and shotgun and start heading toward them.

I would call them back or try to call them back.

Part of the being run off the road thing is a natural tendency to avoid accidents - so when a car gets too close to you - you swerve away from it, but I'd also tell loved one not to stop even if there is a collision, and don't let yourself be run off the road - put your wheels hard into the other car if necesary, you're better off with a collision in the middle of the road than you being off to the side of the road unseen.

I'd also tell her even if you have to put it in reverse and tear your front end off - don't stop and don't get out of your car.

Like peetzakilla said:

If your car goes off the road you don't stop until its disabled. Mailboxes, fences, sheep, run them over. Lay on the horn, nonstop. Run red lights if you can and have to... None of that matters right then.

Doc Intrepid
December 30, 2011, 11:41 PM
"...All true, so sadly true.

So what would you tell your wife or your daughter if she called you in a situation like this? What advice would you give her? What questions would you ask and what would you do with the information?"Kathy,

IMO this is one of the scenarios in which a onboard communications service such as OnStar really shines. To answer your question, I would advise my (wife/neice) to punch the OnStar button, declare an emergency, and have them dial 911. The GPS feature establishes her exact location with respect to local law enforcement.

It also allows the 911 operator (not me) to ask questions regarding the pursuer.

I would also advise them to be prepared to use the handgun they have with them if any attempt is made to stop the vehicle (or other imminent threat). As far as I'm concerned, running someone off the road is assault with a deadly weapon - to wit, the adversary's vehicle.

I concur with many previous remarks as well regarding the situation being a lethal force scenario and giving yourself permission to fight with no holds barred. Most civilians have never used their own vehicles as weapons, and perhaps in a scenario such as the one you've posted, her own vehicle may well have been the best weapon available to the young lady at the moment she was attacked.

wayneinFL
December 31, 2011, 12:50 AM
Something that came to mind after reading that cornered cat link:

There's almost always SOME traffic on the road. What if you just waited until you saw a line of cars coming, then pulled across the oncoming lane, blocking both lanes? Not sudden enough to cause an accident, but enough to get 4 or 5 cars to stop. It would get the attention of several witnesses.

You'd have a bunch of people angry with you, and your attacker would play dumb, and make you out to be a paranoid nutcase. But you'd be alive.

kraigwy
December 31, 2011, 01:03 AM
There's almost always SOME traffic on the road. What if you just waited until you saw a line of cars coming,

I don't know about South Carolina, but I wouldn't count on that happening here.

My truck broke down while hunting one year. I made it to the Highway (450 between Newcastle and Wright) about 7 PM. Started hitch hiking. The second car that came by stopped. That was 2 AM,

jimbob86
December 31, 2011, 01:15 AM
There's almost always SOME traffic on the road. What if you just waited until you saw a line of cars coming, then pulled across the oncoming lane, blocking both lanes? Not sudden enough to cause an accident, but enough to get 4 or 5 cars to stop. It would get the attention of several witnesses.



Bad idea....... The person in the oncoming car could panic and swerve into YOUR lane. Head on collisions are deadly at highway speeds. I'd rather take my chances being run off the road.

If run off the road, keep driving if possible. When it's not, STAY IN THE CAR. If he tries to get you out of the car, fight with whatever you have ...... DO NOT LEAVE WITH HIM, even if he says he'll kill you, because he will in all likelhood, kill you anyway, after he plays whatever reindeer games he wants to first......

...... I think it is far better to pull over, and if he tries to get you out of the car .....well then, as Lawdog put it so very well, "centerpunch his rotten heart out his spineless back".....

http://thelawdogfiles.blogspot.com/2008/03/she-was-doing-everything-she-was.html

wayneinFL
December 31, 2011, 01:32 AM
Bad idea....... The person in the oncoming car could panic and swerve into YOUR lane. Head on collisions are deadly at highway speeds. I'd rather take my chances being run off the road.

Hell, head on collisions are deadly at 35. Obviously, I'm not advocating causing a head on collision:


Not sudden enough to cause an accident

I'd think a 1/4 mile on a straight stretch of highway would be enough to stop traffic, but not enough for a guy to drag a woman out of the car without anyone noticing.

jimbob86
December 31, 2011, 01:37 AM
I'd think a 1/4 mile on a straight stretch of highway would be enough to stop traffic,

Think about that: Don't you see people pasing all the time- they are 1/4 mile away and in your lane....... Unless you stayed in the oncoming lane long enough to frighten them (causing the panic reaction above, possibly), then they'll think nothing of it.........

wayneinFL
December 31, 2011, 01:49 AM
I don't think I am painting a very good picture of what I'm talking about. Maybe because I'm tired.

Let's say the lady was driving on a 2 lane rural highway. Let's say she saw a line of oncoming cars, maybe three or four of them. They're maybe a 1/4 mile down the road. Let's say she pulls across and stops, blocking both lanes. Not only are they going to notice, but they're going to have to stop, because she's in the way. They'd have to at least slow down enough to pull off onto the grass to get around her. No way they're not going to notice a guy trying to drag a woman out of a car.

May still be a stupid idea, may not work all the time, obviously won't work in some places out west. Just a thought.

jimbob86
December 31, 2011, 01:52 AM
Ok sorry I misunderstood, Wayne .....

Hiker 1
January 1, 2012, 01:40 PM
If you receive that phone call, what would you say? How would you respond to the victim's plea for help?

This is sound advice from kraigwy: So if I recieved such call from my wife, I would tell her to aim for the closest ranch house she sees, get on the horn and stay on it as she drives into the rancher's yard and he/she comes to their aid.

This is excellent as well: to give them the social permission to act like a genuine emergency is taking place.

I would advise her how serious this is and to use the car as a weapon if necessary.

I would also try to get a bead on her location and start heading there myself asap. I might be able to get there quicker than the cops.

Hiker 1
January 1, 2012, 01:43 PM
The gloves are off.

Indeed. This case is a reminder that we must prepare our loved ones for the day when the gloves do come off.

pax
January 1, 2012, 01:53 PM
Anything else you guys would do or say as the person on the other end of that frantic phone call?

pax

jimbob86
January 1, 2012, 02:11 PM
Love you. Be Brave. Fight if you must, and fight to win.

Capt Charlie
January 1, 2012, 03:15 PM
This is really a tough one. I don't think anything is going to ensure a happy ending here. In addition to a lot of the good ideas posted here, I can only add this...

5) Because cell phone coverage is spotty to nonexistent in our area, I would not have access to a second phone line, nor would I have confidence that she could call 911 after she'd wasted her first call on me. Although I would rather keep her on the phone myself, for mutual comfort, I would hang up and call 911 with the information she'd given me. I would also direct her to do the same, but I would never assume she'd successfully done so.


Most cell phone services today include conference calling. Use that to bring 911 into the conversation. Stay on the line, but let 911 operators do the talking. They know what questions to ask and will most likely be a lot calmer than you.

Also, I've been told (but can't confirm) that a call to 911 will access ANY carrier's service, so don't assume that cell phone is useless. If, for example, you have service with Verizon, but they have poor service in that area, the call will automatically be routed to any other carrier (AT&T for example) that does have an active signal in that area. Can anyone here confirm or dispute this?

MLeake
January 1, 2012, 03:20 PM
Capt Charlie, in theory, even an old cell phone that is no longer on a plan can access 911 (assuming it is charged). I know people who have kept obsolescent phones as emergency vehicle phones.

I also know I have never seen a roaming bill when using a cell to call 911 from a highway. (I'm one of those people who tends to call in road hazards or broken down cars / distressed motorists, at those times where stopping seems unsafe.)

Pbearperry
January 1, 2012, 03:20 PM
Sadly,most people have no plan in their minds for any type of emergency.The average person seldom feels they will be a victim,it's always someone else.I watch people in public on foot and driving in motor vehicles and they are totally clueless.

wayneinFL
January 1, 2012, 05:09 PM
http://savannahnow.com/latest-news/2011-12-31/savannah-woman-takes-gunman-wild-ride#.TwDY49WriR9

This might work:


Savannah woman takes gunman on wild ride
Posted: December 31, 2011 - 8:34pm

By Constance Cooper

A 50-year-old Savannah nurse took a gunman on a wild ride after she found him hiding in the backseat of her car.

Police say the woman stepped on the accelerator when she spotted a man in a ski mask in her backseat as she pulled her GMC Yukon out of work at the intersection of Eisenhower Drive and Waters Avenue shortly before 8 p.m. Friday.

He put a gun to her head and threatened to kill her. The woman struck a car and a street sign and jumped a concrete median on Eisenhower Drive in an effort to attract attention to herself.

No one was injured in the incident and damages were minor, police say.

The gunman, who remained at large Saturday night, is described as a tall, slender black man wearing a gray and yellow flannel or camouflage ski jacket, a black ski mask, black baseball cap and gloves.
.

Hiker 1
January 1, 2012, 06:57 PM
Anything else you guys would do or say as the person on the other end of that frantic phone call?

"Stay calm. Focus on what you have to do."

MTT TL
January 1, 2012, 07:24 PM
Anything else you guys would do or say as the person on the other end of that frantic phone call?

I guess "I told you so" would be inappropriate?

A few other things I would mention, but lastly I would tell her where I would be trying to link up with her. Since this would be one of the very few times where a confrontation was anticipated I would likely grab my rifle and vest.

wayneinFL
January 1, 2012, 07:29 PM
I guess "I told you so" would be inappropriate?

:D

kilimanjaro
January 2, 2012, 10:40 PM
What a tragic story. Also tragic, is a sheriff who is now giving free pistol classes to citizens. He should have been doing exactly that since day One, and advising folks to get pistols and permits each and every time he was on camera or quoted in the news. "Normalcy Bias" was at work for both this poor woman and law enforcement.

m&p45acp10+1
January 2, 2012, 11:31 PM
If this were someone that is in my close circle of cared for people.

First thing is where are you at?

Second do not let them get around or beside you. If they get beside you brake hard let them pass. Stop quickly and double back if you can. If you can not keep them ahead of you. Do not stop for them.

Do not hang up. I am going to get 911 on 3 way calling. I want you to talk to the operator.

baddarryl
January 3, 2012, 12:46 AM
The smiling, friendly look on her face of that video is the most chilling aspect of this. I hope they fry that dog.

Discern
January 3, 2012, 12:57 AM
Typically, a person can do a 3 way call with a cell phone. IMO, the person who is called should first get the location and try a 3 way call by calling 911, quickly explaining the situation to the 911 operator and bringing on the person being followed. I can text or email while on a call. It would be hard, but if a picture of the vehicle (while being followed - hold cell phone up and take picture out the back window) was taken try texting or emailing the picture. If forced off the road take a picture as soon and they are visible while locked in vehicle and try to text or email. It might be enough to scare the stalker away. Fight like made to stay alive and fight dirty.

I also agree with looking for a farm or business with people outside, flashing lights, honking your horn.

The fuel cutoff is generally activated when hit from behind - it is designed to stop pumping fuel in case the fuel tank or fuel line is damaged in a rear end collision. You might disable your own vehicle and not the vehicle of the stalker if the stalker hits your rear bumper. Some vehicles have the fuel cut off reset switch on the front passenger side. IMO it is a good idea to know where this switch is located on all of your vehicles.

Merad
January 3, 2012, 08:54 AM
Regarding 3 way calls - having worked briefly for a cell phone company I'd hazard a guess that probably 95% of people couldn't do a 3 way on their phone while calmly sitting on their couch at home.

Unfortunately this seems like the kind of situation where you join the game after the cards have been dealt. You can and should try to call 911, direct them to populated areas, etc... but if this happens on a country road out in BFE, none of that is likely to be available (in time). The outcome will depend on what they already know as far as defensive driving or unarmed self defense skills.

m&p45acp10+1
January 3, 2012, 05:33 PM
I am still in the camp of telling the other person to pay attention to the road. After they have told me where they are. Make sure they have both hands on the wheel. Turn the phone on speaker if necessary. Above all do not let the perp push you off the road. If they hit your car keep driving, do not stop. Drive the car away.

FairWarning
January 12, 2012, 11:11 PM
Sad story. The only bright spot (besides the thug being where he belongs) is that it may be a lesson learned for a future would be victim.

Also when your life is on the line, don't forget that your CAR is also a weapon. Use it with no restrictions if you have no other options. If someone hits your car....so what? Don't pull over for them. This kind of story is also a good argument for having a large, solidly built car. Might come in handy as a sledge hammer one day.

freenokia
January 28, 2012, 09:19 PM
Turn on the hazards and get on the gas. Then to head to the nearest safest place.

If that's towards police, tell her to hang up and call 911 and put the phone on speaker. I would also call 911 to give them more details.

If I'm the nearest safest place, idealy we would both put our phones on speaker and I would start heading in her direction till I saw hazards...then...it's fixin to hit the fan in the worst way.