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Gbro
December 26, 2011, 08:35 PM
http://www.nashwauk.net/images/graphics/linx1.jpg
This is a "Fresh" set of photo that have not even been taken off the camera. My Daughter took these with her I phone from the image on a camera's review screen.
These were taken in the little town of Coleraine Minnesota on December 26, 2011 1630hrs.
My daughter was waiting along with her husbands family for another family member that was just about to leave her house and spotted this Kitty in her yard. She took a bunch of pictures and then called saying she isn't going outside just yet because of a large cat in the yard.
She calls 911 and reports a large cat in her yard and was transferred to the local DNR office. She describes that she believes there is a Linkx in her yard and was told that its not possible because there are no Linkx in MN. and that they will not come out unless there are more calls.
My daughter calls me at work asking if there are Linkx in MN and I said that I believe there are and ask for pictures, that is when she takes the I-phone photo's.
I then called the local Conservation Officer that I work with doing Firearms Safety and ask him about Linkx and he tells me that he has taken them out of traps when the trappers make the call, and that they once had a trapper bring in a hybrid that neither he nor the wildlife biologist could id. It took DNA to ID that one.
Well, he states that these pictures look very much like a Linkx. :)
http://www.nashwauk.net/images/graphics/linx2.jpg

More photo's will follow soon.

JohnKSa
December 26, 2011, 09:08 PM
First of all, that's definitely a lynx.

Second, the DNR office is not well informed. It seems to be common knowledge that they are found in parts of MN.

http://www.d.umn.edu/vdil/research/2007reports/carr.html
http://www.defenders.org/wildlife_and_habitat/wildlife/lynx.php

Very cool pictures...

GojuBrian
December 26, 2011, 09:17 PM
Yeah, game and fish told me there's no rattlesnakes or Panthers in Arkansas either. I've seen two panthers and countless rattlers here with my own eyes.
That a lynx alright. Very cool.

Art Eatman
December 26, 2011, 11:10 PM
Yup. The tufts on the ears are the main clue.

Gbro
December 26, 2011, 11:11 PM
I got the real pictures. This event made for a lot of excitement for that family today.
http://www.nashwauk.net/images/graphics/linkx3.jpg
http://www.nashwauk.net/images/graphics/linkx4.jpg
http://www.nashwauk.net/images/graphics/linkx5.jpg
http://www.nashwauk.net/images/graphics/linkx6.jpg
http://www.nashwauk.net/images/graphics/linkx7.jpg
http://www.nashwauk.net/images/graphics/linkx8.jpg

warbirdlover
December 27, 2011, 12:02 AM
The DNR makes me laugh sometimes at their sheer stupidity and ignorance on subjects in which they should be the leading authority. :D:rolleyes::D

Buzzcook
December 27, 2011, 02:10 AM
Beautiful animals. Pretty scarce. They usually get forced out by bobcats.

Do not shoot.

Shoes
December 27, 2011, 07:51 AM
Thanks for posting the pictures. That is a beautiful animal. I second, Dont Shoot!

Shoes

2damnold4this
December 27, 2011, 09:00 AM
Great pics!

BIGR
December 27, 2011, 09:06 AM
Something different that you just don't see.

Kind of like wildlife officials deny the existance of large cats (MTN. Lions, Cougars and Panthers) in some places. We know better.

Gbro
December 27, 2011, 09:20 AM
Yes this is a camera only shoot.
This is an animal that is normally a deep forest dweller that relies on the snowshoe hare as its #1 prey.
This fine species is being used as a tool to shut down logging across the nation.
What I have read the issues are the logging roads that allow the Barrows Linkx to go deeper into the forest thereby competing with the Canadian Linkx for the snowshoe hare.
Unfortunately the snowshoe hare is at a point we could well rename it to "Snowshoe Rare" and not because of a Bob Cat accessing forest roads.
This past hunting season my highlight was when I saw my 1st snowshoe in two years. That is 2 full years not just hunting sightings!
This is a time to do a backtrack and leave the area as to not cause undue stress to the Rare Critter.
Hey i might be becoming a "Bunny Hugger" ! :eek:
35 years ago we could take the children on a 20-30 mile drive around the township north of the little town and see 60-70 snowshoe and maybe some cotton tails too.
This Canadian Linkx's visit is most likely to do with the abundant Grey Squirrel populations we have in towns around the area.

tahunua001
December 27, 2011, 09:30 AM
that's a big lynx! either that or I'm just used to our tiny bobcat population out here. hope no one in the neighborhood has a wiener dog :D

he doesn't look malnourished so he wasn't driven there by hunger, he was probably just curious

VINCENT1
December 27, 2011, 09:54 AM
yes, thats a lynx. class 2 cat. not likly to attack a human, and even if it did you have a good chance of not only fighting it off, and an even better chance of surviving. i love lynx, but prefer something a bit bigger.
heres a pic of my kitties
http://i971.photobucket.com/albums/ae198/jt86571/TAWNIAANDSHIRKAHN.jpg
http://i971.photobucket.com/albums/ae198/jt86571/TAWNIAEATING.jpg

Gbro
December 27, 2011, 10:11 AM
Yesterday when my daughter called me at work telling me about this Linkx an old friend in his early 80's that is restoring a Model T, had stopped into the Parts store and we looked at the pictures together. He said back in the '50's there was an old Conservation Officer by the name of Louis Peloquin (http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/wmas/detail_report.html?map=COMPASS_MAPFILE&mode=itemquery&qlayer=bdry_adwma2py3_query&qitem=uniqueid&qstring=WMA0128600) who told him about the time an area trapper brought in a Linkx he had trapped in the Hibbing Mn. area and he then reported it to the St. Paul office. The powers behind the DNR at that time told him that its imposable because there are no Canadian Linkx in MN. He then took the linkx to St. Paul and although they agreed that it was in fact a Linkx, but it was probably trapped somewhere else because again there are no Linkx in Minnesota. :rolleyes:

warbirdlover
December 27, 2011, 10:58 AM
I've looked up pics of both a Lynx and Bobcat and damned if I can tell the difference..... Which is it? My wife says it's a Bobcat. She went to college to be a DNR biologist and then changed her major.

VINCENT1
December 27, 2011, 11:06 AM
lynx is some what bigger,and thicker. although very similar, a lynx is far more relaxed, and a bobcat is more skitish, and agressive. lynx has longer rear legs for moving through the snow, much like a florida panther is the same as a mountain lion, but has longer rear legs for moving through the florida swamps.

in essence a lynx, and a bob cat are the same much like a puma, mt lion, cougar, and panther are all the same. just slight body variations due to thier habitat.

BIGR
December 27, 2011, 11:29 AM
While you guys are analyzing cats. Do think these pictures are of a Bobcat. I just recently got this one on the game cam.

FrankenMauser
December 27, 2011, 01:08 PM
While you guys are analyzing cats. Do think these pictures are of a Bobcat. I just recently got this one on the game cam.
I don't think that's a cat. The legs are too skinny, and the rump slopes too much. It looks more like a dog, or an overgrown weasel, to me.

warbirdlover
December 27, 2011, 02:20 PM
I don't know what it is but am pretty sure it's not a Lynx or Bobcat.

rickyrick
December 27, 2011, 02:45 PM
I was thinking canine also.

huntinaz
December 27, 2011, 04:21 PM
While you guys are analyzing cats. Do think these pictures are of a Bobcat. I just recently got this one on the game cam.

Except for the bobcat looking tail in the second pic, I think it looks like a fox.

JohnKSa
December 27, 2011, 04:51 PM
In essence a lynx, and a bob cat are the same much like a puma, mt lion, cougar, and panther are all the same. just slight body variations due to thier habitat.That's not really correct.

Puma, Mt Lion, Cougar, Florida Panther, Catamount, and Panther are all different names for the same species, Puma concolor.

Canadian Lynx (Lynx canadensis) and Bobcats (Lynx rufus) are distinct species, however they are both in the Lynx genus.

rjrivero
December 27, 2011, 05:12 PM
Puma, Mt Lion, Cougar and Panther are all names for the same species, Puma concolor.

Canadian Lynx (Lynx canadensis) and Bobcats (Lynx rufus) are different species, however they are both in the Lynx genus.

I remember reading an article some time ago about a Hybridization of the two species due to a change in their food sources forcing them in closer proximity. I forget the actual concerns about the hybridization, but the upshot is that they could loose the pure Lynx canadensis and pure Lynx rufus species all together.

jimbob86
December 27, 2011, 05:18 PM
I've seen quite a few bobcats...... in comparison to what is in those pics, they are squatty, compact critters...... that stilt legged critter in your pics is not a bobcat, for sure.

Brian Pfleuger
December 27, 2011, 05:57 PM
While you guys are analyzing cats. Do think these pictures are of a Bobcat. I just recently got this one on the game cam.

That's almost certainly a bobcat.

The stripes in the front legs and the tail in Pic2 almost exactly match the picture of the bobcat posted above, which I add below as a visible pic rather than a link:

http://thefiringline.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=76828&d=1325003371

http://thefiringline.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=76825&d=1325001506


Here's another infrared picture of a bobcat I found, looks just like yours, IMO:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_T0dqjeyXsOE/TRE4dwLOpuI/AAAAAAAANGM/0bkiToXGKYM/s1600/IMG_0011.JPG

BIGR
December 27, 2011, 05:59 PM
I agree peetzakilla. I had some pictures of one back in the spring.

Dr. Strangelove
December 27, 2011, 06:08 PM
The DNR makes me laugh sometimes at their sheer stupidity and ignorance on subjects in which they should be the leading authority.

If they acknowledge it exists, then they have to "manage" it. If the animal simply "doesn't exist in this state", well, there's nothing to "manage".

Sometimes it's also simply better for the animal if it "doesn't exist".

Art Eatman
December 27, 2011, 06:10 PM
A quick-glance differentiation between a bobcat and a lynx, other than size, would be the grayer color of the lynx and the larger ear tufts.

I've only seen a lynx in a zoo, although I've been sorta up close and personal with a bobcat or two:

http://thefiringline.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=14151&d=1122235264

rjrivero
December 27, 2011, 06:51 PM
A quick-glance differentiation between a bobcat and a lynx, other than size, would be the grayer color of the lynx and the larger ear tufts. The long hind legs in proportion to it's body height, along with the thick fur on the legs are lynx characteristics as well. Helps them chase down bunnies in the heavy snow cover of the great white north.

huntinaz
December 27, 2011, 09:23 PM
That's almost certainly a bobcat.

The stripes in the front legs and the tail in Pic2 almost exactly match the picture of the bobcat posted above

Yep, I apparently did not look at the pics very well the first time around. I didn't even see the stripes on the legs, pretty good sign. Also the coloration on the hind legs looks like a bobcat. Plus the 2nd and 3rd pics you can see the head better, it looks too wide for a fox and snout is short too.

Basically, it really doesn't look much at all like a fox, and a lot like a bobcat.

mete
December 27, 2011, 10:07 PM
Linx has big feet to help going through the snow ! It was a lynx !
One comment I saw was that a 30 lb lynx has bigger feet than a 200 lb mountain lion !!

warbirdlover
December 28, 2011, 12:09 AM
I'm not too sure the place I found the bobcat and lynx photos at really know which is which. Need to look on some biology source I guess but let's try this for now.....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynx

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobcat

Looks like a Lynx to me....


.

TheGoldenState
December 28, 2011, 12:28 AM
Let's add a poll:D

Art Eatman
December 28, 2011, 11:22 AM
Back some fifty years ago, a family in Fort Lauderdale found a little spotted kitten. They took it in and raised it. But it was a fighting little dude, whipping the neighborhood dogs. In one fight it got a couple of cuts so they took it to the vet. When they got it back, the bill was up around $150. They were shocked and asked why so high.

The vet explained that Florida law required that he pull the eyeteeth and front claws, for people to be able to have a pet bobcat.

rickyrick
December 28, 2011, 11:49 AM
Now that It's pointed out I do see the stripes on the animal

langenc
December 30, 2011, 07:50 PM
The paws sure look lynxie.

VINCENT1
December 30, 2011, 08:47 PM
That's not really correct.

Puma, Mt Lion, Cougar, Florida Panther, Catamount, and Panther are all different names for the same species, Puma concolor.

Canadian Lynx (Lynx canadensis) and Bobcats (Lynx rufus) are distinct species, however they are both in the Lynx genus.


let me know the next time you go hands on with multiple of these. i have hand raised them, and i can say with all honestly. the are similar, they are NOT the same. there are ver certain differences. feel free to come over and i will intor duce you to two here at the house, and a few more that live down the street at my good friends house. i'm more than positive of what i say reguarding large cats. i dont think anyone on this entire board has the ability to challange my personal hands on experience. PERIOD

VINCENT1
December 30, 2011, 08:51 PM
Linx has big feet to help going through the snow ! It was a lynx !
One comment I saw was that a 30 lb lynx has bigger feet than a 200 lb mountain lion !!


a 30lbs lynx? that would be less then half grown. and as of yet, i have never met a 200 lbs cougar/mt lion etc. a typical on is 90 while a large one would be 120. i've never heard of one over 150.

jimbob86
December 30, 2011, 09:03 PM
Vince, I don't think he was saying they were the same ......

Canadian Lynx (Lynx canadensis) and Bobcats (Lynx rufus) are distinct species, however they are both in the Lynx genus.

VINCENT1
December 30, 2011, 09:12 PM
oh. my bad. :rolleyes:

JohnKSa
December 30, 2011, 09:38 PM
I saw a post that said that bobcats and Canadian Lynxes were essentially the same species with only variations due to regional differences--like the regional subspecies variations in the single species, Puma concolor (cougar/mountain lion/Florida panther/puma/etc.)

I responded that they bobcat (Lynx rufus) and the Canadian Lynx (Lynx canadensis) are actually distinct (different) species, they are not the merely subspecies or regional variations. They are in the same genus, however.

Here's a factsheet on how to tell the difference between bobcats and lynxes.

http://www.vtfishandwildlife.com/library/Factsheets/furbearer/how_to_avoid_incidental_take_of_lynx.pdf

As far as 30lbs being a half-grown Canadian Lynx, from everything I can find, the average size for adult males is pretty close to 30lbs--maybe even a little under that. It would seem that in the wild, anything over 40lbs is truly exceptional.

Maybe they get heavier in captivity.

VINCENT1
December 30, 2011, 10:01 PM
pick one up some time, it will be the heaviest 30 lbs you have ever lifted. i promise. canadians are probably a bit lighter then a siberian, but the are definatly well over 30 lbs. a coyote is 30 to 50 lbs, and they are much smaller

JohnKSa
December 31, 2011, 12:40 AM
...canadians are probably a bit lighter then a siberian...Based on what I can find, an adult Canadian Lynx is about half the weight of an adult Eurasian Lynx....it will be the heaviest 30 lbs you have ever lifted.Maybe they get heavier in captivity when they are fed regularly and don't have to run down their prey.

Art Eatman
December 31, 2011, 11:22 AM
Texas bobcats run 25 to 35 pounds; I've read that the more northern bobcats are heavier--which ties in with my previous comments in another thread about size differences between northern and southern critters of a species.

Siberian? A NatGeo program on Siberia claimed that the big male bears there could regularly go as much as a ton. I'd therefore not be surprised that other examples would show larger sizes than here in the US.

"JJ"
December 31, 2011, 01:09 PM
Well I'm gonna throw in my $.02 here!!:o

As for the original post, Lynx all the way. I would guess it is one of this years juveniles.

BIGR SAID:
While you guys are analyzing cats. Do think these pictures are of a Bobcat. I just recently got this one on the game cam.

I say bobcat all the way! The markings on the legs on the "BOBBED" spotted tail help me form my hypothesis!


As for Texas bobcats, 25-30lbs is not unheard of by any means, in NE Texas I think the average may be about 5 lbs lighter. I have seen pics of bobcats in the mid 30s from around here, but most of the ones I have seen are in the low to mid 20s. The local taxi I trade with mounted 54 bobcats from last Winter. I didn't see them all but got reports of the sizes and pics of the big ones. I watched as he and his apprentice mounted a few.

On to this size of a linx, I thinks it it depends on the location and the sub-species.

Part of an article on the subject:
There are three different types of lynx with these being the North America lynx found in Canada and Alaska, the European lynx found in Spain and Portugal and the Asian lynx which is found in Turkestan and central Asia.

The North American lynx is the biggest species of lynx and some of these lynx individuals have extremely thick and fluffy looking fur which keeps the lynx warm in the freezing Canadian winter. The European and Asian lynx species are much smaller in size and have personalities that resemble those of a domestic cat, rather than a large feline.


Of course In North American we should just see the one species, but online research can give info on any of them. A mature lynx will USUALLY have almost a beard for the two tuffs of fur on the sides of its face growing together. The tuffs of fur on the ears are usually a bit more distinct the that on a bobcat. usually their tail will be solid with a darker tip. The majority of bobcats will have some spots on their tails and what appears to be a white tip. On closer inspection the white is on the underside of the tail but is usuall visible due to it being curled up.
Most information list a full grown North American lynx tom at 20-30 lbs, but they do get a LOT bigger!!

Here is a video of Loren Reese, an avid hunter/caller in Alaska who also make some great calls. This is a larger then average tom, but none the less BIG!
Big Lynx called in in Kenai, Alaska with Loren Reese of Reese Outdoors (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9EI9gYK0EKY&feature=mfu_in_order&list=UL)

It almost looks like the Grentch!!:eek:
Beautiful cat none the less!