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warbirdlover
November 15, 2011, 12:25 AM
I hate that term. I never use it. It would make me feel like I'm kissing some tree hugger's a**. No more X-mas in stores. Now it's the "holidays". This politically correct crap stuff is starting to get so rediculous. "We're going to harvest a deer!" Wheeeee.

Sorry. Rant over. :D

kraigwy
November 15, 2011, 12:47 AM
No more X-mas in stores. Now it's the "holidays".

Harvest regarding hunting limits dosn't bother me near as much is one complaining about replacing Christmas with holiday then in his rant X'ing out Christ.

What that has to do with guns is beyond me though.

twins
November 15, 2011, 07:39 AM
Variety is the spice of life.

Sensitivity training for all.

shortwave
November 15, 2011, 08:06 AM
Before this ones closed...

...I'm with kraigwy.

Can't stand the 'x-mas' thing.

Scout
November 15, 2011, 08:16 AM
I believe in hunt and release.

musher
November 15, 2011, 08:51 AM
Since I hunt to eat, harvest seems like a good word to me.

stu925
November 15, 2011, 08:56 AM
My wife once asked me when I came home from a hunting trip if I "caught anything". I thought that was pretty funny as I had a mental image of jumping out of my tree stand on top of the deer. Now she just asks "did you shoot anything?". The term harvest doesn't offend me, although I've had enough of all the other PC crap. Was a big stink a couple years back over a HS football team mascot, the team mascot is an Indian. That irritated me a bit but the school stood their ground which I was happy to see.

Stu

hornetguy
November 15, 2011, 09:02 AM
I have sort of liked the idea of using the word "harvest" when discussing hunting amongst non-hunters. It seems to give them a reminder that meat doesn't come from a grocery store.. it begins with the harvesting of an animal.
While I've never been one to be "politically correct", and this topic has nothing to do with politics, I have no problem with using the term "harvest".
When talking to just my friends that hunt, I'm liable to say that I'm going out to try to slaughter Bambi. :D

chewie146
November 15, 2011, 09:12 AM
My daughters use the word "catch" too. They're 4 and 6. That's fine with me. They're little kids. PC is here to stay, ladies and gentlemen...whoops. I said ladies. I forgot about that one. It's not a bad idea to be sensitive to others sensibilities. You're an ambassador for your sport, even though sometimes it's very irritating. Support for hunting is going back up nationally, even though hunting license sales are dropping some in many locations. The numbers of women and youth hunting is going up. If a name change is part of these other changes, that's fine with me.

22-rimfire
November 15, 2011, 11:24 AM
I like "harvest" better than "kill". But that is me. For years, states would publish maps or records showing the deer harvest by county. From their perspective, the term is correct as they are viewing hunting from a game management perspective.

When I read the term "harvest", I think of a hunter sitting in a permanent stand in South Texas or Central Texas where management rules. Ten deer are wandering around on a food plot or near a feeder and the hunter chooses the one he wants to "harvest" from his stand position. I realize as I present this, it has a pretty negative connatation from a traditional hunting point of view. But there is room for all kinds of legal forms of hunting. If I had the money I would be right out there trying to "harvest" one there myself. It is not as easy as it is typically presented in the hunting shows on TV. I have never shot a B&C 150 point scored buck in my life and would love to.

I can't agree with you more about Christmas. PC is taking over (for now); it will change.

warbirdlover
November 15, 2011, 11:36 AM
I didn't mean to PO anyone. Just got a bug in my rear I guess. Like we have to use the word harvest or they'll take away our hunting privileges. But I guess when dealing with the anti's etc it's probably a better word to use. ;)

Wyoredman
November 15, 2011, 12:02 PM
The word "harvest" has nothing to do with political correctness and everything to do with game management. Historically, Americans have managed wildlife as a farmer would a crop. We hunters mandated that the States produce game in numbers above the minimum needed for a viable population. This approach allows us to "harvest" the excess animals by hunting, just as a farmer plants grains that produce enough seed to be planted again.

It is pretty much a given that in order to "harvest" an animal, one must kill that animal, but not always. Take for instance, the BLM wild horse program. Each year in the western states the BLM "harvests" the excess wild horses from the range and then these animals are made available to the general public. Another insance of "harvesting" game without killing it is the Bison roundup in Montana. This critters are then given to Native Americans to bolster their herds.

But I digress. "Harvesting" excess game with a tool (firearm) has been one of our founding game management philosophies since Aldo Leopold.

“There are two spiritual dangers in not owning a farm. One is the danger of supposing that breakfast comes from the grocery, and the other that heat comes from the furnace.”
― Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac

Wyoredman
November 15, 2011, 12:13 PM
In his book, "Game Management", Aldo Leopold defined it as "the art of making land produce sustained annual crops of wild game for recreational use".

In other words, he is sugessting that the land can produce a "harvest" of game for the hunter.

This, I believe, is where the word originated. Not from the PC world we live in now.

doofus47
November 15, 2011, 12:21 PM
I'm more in line with Warbird and Kraigwy, although not enough to rant.

Words have meaning. If I don't harvest cows at the slaughterhouse, I don't harvest game 3 miles off the beaten path in the dark timber.

hogdogs
November 15, 2011, 01:03 PM
I HARVEST deer...
I am not a sport hunter...
I feed them corn and shoot them from my bedroom window or from a lawn chair with a cup of coffee beside me.

When I "hunt" in the woods, I am just strollin' with a gun in hand. Deer steps out, if legal, I shoot him. Not much huntin' there...


Now hog doggin' I never call "Hog Harvesting"... I actually have to hunt and work and am hands on with a potentially lethal animal...

Brent

Art Eatman
November 15, 2011, 01:05 PM
Forty/fifty years ago, it was quite common for deer hunters to tie Bambi to a fender or across the trunk for the ride home if they were in a car. Even the ladies would ask a guy whom they knew was a hunter if he had killed a deer, yet?

Then PC attacked, and successful hunters now hide their deer under a tarp and talk about harvesting. In modern America, the deal is to avoid talking about reality and the way the world really works.

buck460XVR
November 15, 2011, 01:22 PM
I think some use the word "Harvest" outta respect for their quarry. In many cases it is actually more appropriate than the word "hunt". If you plant a kernel of grain and nurture it and protect it till it is ripe, you don't "hunt" it, you "harvest" it. That is what deer hunting has got to be in many places, especially behind high fences. Folks feed and water deer, protect them from predation and other hunters and then when they have antlers big enough or they don't produce quality offspring, they don't really "hunt" them, they just go out to the feeder and "harvest" them. Either way, I still like the term better than some of the newer terms that many like to use, i.e......"DRT" and "Whack 'em and Stack 'em!".

Indi
November 15, 2011, 01:30 PM
Wouldnt that be the right term if you are going to kill it for consumption. My buddy told me that his family used to grow beef (raise cattle). :D
I guess if you grow your own beef, you could harvest it

AllenJ
November 15, 2011, 01:30 PM
It seems like more and more we are told not to "offend" people by saying "Christmas time" or "I killed a deer". Yet I have to put up with listening to other use vulgar language in public and allow them to let their behind hang out of their pants? Now my rant is over :D

musher
November 15, 2011, 01:53 PM
My wife once asked me when I came home from a hunting trip if I "caught anything".

That's a pretty common way to talk about it up here. I often say things like "We caught a moose".

I'm sure it's not a result of any excess sensitivity on my part, having been certified by those who know as somewhat lacking in that respect.

ISP 5353
November 15, 2011, 03:03 PM
I don't get real hung up on what people want to call it. I hunt and kill deer, but if others prefer "Harvest" then that is fine with me too. I am just happy to see people out hunting!

warbirdlover
November 15, 2011, 03:18 PM
Forty/fifty years ago, it was quite common for deer hunters to tie Bambi to a fender or across the trunk for the ride home if they were in a car. Even the ladies would ask a guy whom they knew was a hunter if he had killed a deer, yet?

Then PC attacked, and successful hunters now hide their deer under a tarp and talk about harvesting. In modern America, the deal is to avoid talking about reality and the way the world really works.

In Wisconsin you HAVE to display the whole deer outside of the vehicle (or in the truck bed with the tail gate down) until you have it registered.

So we still drive around with our harvested, dead, bloody deer on our fenders! :D

Saltydog235
November 15, 2011, 03:27 PM
I'll third the taking Christ out of Christmas sentiment. If you aren't celebrating His birthday then you should be working or something.

I don't harvest anything but veggies. I take game I kill it. I shoot deer, you could concievable call it murder or assassination, I call it fun and rewarding.

Brian Pfleuger
November 15, 2011, 04:28 PM
I call it harvesting. I actually think it works FOR our cause rather than against it.

I harvest corn, beans, all kinds of trees for building and heat.

There really is no distinction. We have dominion over the plants AND the animals.

It is no less immoral to eradicate an entire forest full of Red Woods for no purpose than to kill a herd of deer for no purpose.

It is equally moral to harvest animals for human use as it is to harvest corn, or trees to build a house.

Only humans can be murdered. Animals and plants can be killed and wasted.

Pahoo
November 15, 2011, 04:59 PM
warbirdlover
I too take some exception to this term and it's application. To me, animals are flesh and blood and have never seen any roots. ;)
Another term you hear, is Cull or Culling and that seems more applicable.

There are times I teach Hunter Ethics during our Hunter safety classes and I call it like it is and that is killing animals. I don't want to soften or play it down. I want the students to understand what we are doing and be fully responsible for our actions. I get some strange looks when I state then I'm not out there to hurt animals but instead to kill them. Not a big hang-up but I do have them ... .;)


Be Safe !!!

BIG P
November 15, 2011, 07:25 PM
I've been killin deer a long long time,hope to keep killing them for a while.Aint My problem or worry what the Penny loffer wearing carpet boys call it.Aint real big on being politicially correct either,cant see where that helps anything.SO I think I'M just goin to keep killin & grillin thank ya.:D

fisherman66
November 15, 2011, 07:35 PM
I'll third the taking Christ out of Christmas sentiment. If you aren't celebrating His birthday then you should be working or something.

I'll be inspecting my eyelids after assembling whatever the wife brings home from black Friday. Even this atheist has the first lighted house (15 strands of 14' C9s)...making it secular year after year!

Harvest, murder, shoot, kill, pull out of my @$$...don't make no difference to me.

American Made
November 15, 2011, 08:05 PM
Here is my best attempt (In my Idahoan PC language) telling you good folks what took place today: My .358 Win shot it's first deer today:D Hardly any cleaning required because it blew the smithereens out of 'm. How did I do?

The people that don't hunt always ask if I "caught anything" around here too. For those that hunt we always say " we're going to fill the freezer. "

huntinaz
November 15, 2011, 08:52 PM
In modern America, the deal is to avoid talking about reality and the way the world really works.

Ain't that the truth!

RevGeo
November 16, 2011, 11:29 AM
So I guess if I go hunting in some African country or China I would be an international harvester, huh?
I go hunting. I shoot my game. I gut 'em. I take 'em home in the back of the truck, hang 'em, skin 'em, age 'em, cut 'em up and eat 'em.

Do anglers 'harvest' the fish they keep? Why are anti-hunters generally not anti-fishing? Is it because fish aren't cute like deer or bear? Why is it okay to say 'Nice mess of fish'?
When I go berry picking I don't kill the plant - I cruelly rip part of the living organism apart. When I pick mushrooms I tear the fungus from the ground, killing it with my bare hands.

I'm not a christian but I celebrate xmas every year.

Wyoredman
November 16, 2011, 12:03 PM
I "gleaned" much information and "garnered" many compliments by "gathering" meat "harvested" during the controlled deer "cull"!

Or....

I "lern't" a bunch and "got" lots of congrats by "collecting' all these good steaks I "killed" during that buck "hunt".

The first is how I would likely talk to a group of non hunters and the second is how I would express the same thought to my hunting buddies. The meaning is the same, but the first doesn't portray me as the redneck I am!

BTW - glean, garner, gather, harvest, cull, and collect are all synonyms!

Brian Pfleuger
November 16, 2011, 12:18 PM
I'm confident that I wouldn't use either of those sentences with any audience.

Wyoredman
November 16, 2011, 12:25 PM
Thats why you eastern folk are so much more sophisticated!:p;)

musicmatty
November 16, 2011, 12:28 PM
I prefer 'Harvest'..it's the sum of the whole process is it not :eek: As for the other sentiments about Holiday or Christmas...it's Christmas and this is what our Federal Government has deemed it to be long long ago like it or not :cool:

rickyrick
November 16, 2011, 01:52 PM
I harvested a rat in a rat harvester.


i may have possibly harvested a donut this morning.


All joking aside, I think harvesting may be appropriate if the animal is mostly consumed, or used in some way other than just a trophy.

But I see the point of contention, in that it does have a buzzword type feel to it.

Kreyzhorse
November 16, 2011, 07:26 PM
I eat what I hunt so I have no problem with anyone using the term harvest.

Besides, and it was pointed out above, harvest really implies that we have dominion over the animals we take. PETA on the other hand talks about animal rights and claim that hunting them violates those rights. They use words like "killing" while attempting to characterize all hunters as brainless, blood thristy sub-humans and hope to evoke emotions in both the anti's and those on the fence. PETA doesn't care about facts, they want emotion. They want people to get upset.

The term "harvest" to me anyway, takes the emotion out of it.

aaalaska
November 16, 2011, 09:56 PM
I,ve killed many creatures over the years. Most were harvested, some were killed to relieve a problem.Probably the largest number were killed and not harvested ,except perhaps by the vultures .Gophers , ground squirrels ,chucks. rats & mice abound in the farm country I grew up in and their numbers must be reduced. But killing is what we do, and the effort to somehow [clean ] it up over the years has gotten out of hand.

603Country
November 16, 2011, 10:04 PM
All this talk has caused me to think about what I call it, instead of 'Harvesting" - which seems to me to be a ridiculous word when used for deer hunting, but is a word that has probably been brought in for use to pacify the non-hunters and anti-hunters. Anyway, it seems that since I was a kid the term I'd use when I got home from hunting would be to tell the folks that "I shot a deer". They would automatically assume that my shot was effective unless I said otherwise. That's the term I still use to this day. And maybe the reason I don't like the word "harvest" in this hunting context is more because the word was employed to pacify the anti-hunters. If I ever use that word in regard to hunting, I want one of you guys to drive over here and whop me upside the head. And it's getting late, so I'll go get a glass of milk and harvest me a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

Gunplummer
November 17, 2011, 07:09 AM
"Did you catch anything" is a woman thing. I think they were the first to use politically correct language. I either "Got" or "Killed" a deer. I did not pick it off a tree. You won't make a Tree Hugger happy saying harvest, so why bother. If you are ashamed to talk about what you do, don't do it.

warbirdlover
November 17, 2011, 10:17 AM
So I guess if I go hunting in some African country or China I would be an international harvester, huh?

God I love this forum!! :D

Archer 9505
November 17, 2011, 01:09 PM
Now that I know it tweaks a few thin skins; I plan on using it more often. Now excuse me while I go "Harvest" a cup of coffee.

I prefer 'Harvest'..it's the sum of the whole process

^+1

I'm confident that I wouldn't use either of those sentences with any audience.


^+1

Buzzcook
November 17, 2011, 03:55 PM
I got no problem with either harvest or xmas. Depends on the context and how it scans in a sentence.

BTW people were celebrating winter solstice long before there was a "White Christ" and his adherents.
Heck the guy wasn't even born in winter. Early Christians just co-opted the Saturnalia, just as they did with Halloween.
If you're a "xtian" then you should celebrate the birth of your savior on March 25th. Leave Yule to Mithras and the other pagans.

BUFF
November 17, 2011, 04:41 PM
I am wildlife population control specialist that keep deer on "hoof storage" until I harvest them. Is that PC enough?:p

I hunt deer...then I kill deer. Usually one that is unlucky enough to get in range. If I was lucky enough to have a huge herd of deer on my land, then I could be more selective and "cull" from the herd. Thus "harvesting" enough deer to feed my family while maintaining a healthy herd. And being a good steward of the land. Which is the point of game management, right?

I just hate hearing Christmas music and seeing the decorations the day after Halloween.:mad:

Hog Buster
November 17, 2011, 07:07 PM
Give me a break!

You catch fish. You kill game. You slaughter stock....... You harvest crops......

Merry Christmas everybody......

rickyrick
November 17, 2011, 09:46 PM
Hog buster gets my vote for best answer

Sarge
November 17, 2011, 10:42 PM
Give me a break!

You catch fish. You kill game. You slaughter stock....... You harvest crops......

Merry Christmas everybody......

Amen. We harvest crops, pick 'maters, kill weeds and shoot deer, here. Ain't proper to eat them otherwise.

jason_iowa
November 18, 2011, 12:25 AM
I typically hear about harvesting deer as a whole such as "I wonder how many deer were harvested this year". Not so much about individuals going out to harvest deer.

I have never gone deer hunting. I usually pick up a spare from friends or family and pay for processing. Seems there is always plenty to go around. I agree its important for people to understand where our food comes from. The act of harvesting our crops kill way more animals then hunters do. From mice to deer and all manner birds. Someone who says eating soybeans is animal friendly has never run a combine through a field.

Like some said earlier an act of violence is used to acquire our food regardless of what it is. Harvest is as violent a term as kill or hunt imo. Survival is a bloody business if ya don't like it see your way out.

lefteye
November 18, 2011, 01:12 AM
Dang - that 10 point was out of harvesting range in the corn field my friend had just killed. Duh!

Hog Buster
November 18, 2011, 01:30 AM
Some folks think that using some buzzword for kill makes it sound more acceptable to the great uninformed masses. It doesn’t, it only sounds foolish...... What’s next, I took my 30/06 combine and harvested a deer?....... Sounds like you ran over it with a big green tractor.

It all stems from “Thou shall not kill” taken literally. This is a bad translation. What it really says is “Thou shall not murder”.

There’s a quite a bit of difference between murdering and killing.

Double Naught Spy
November 18, 2011, 09:02 AM
Hog buster gets my vote for best answer

After being told by several "purists" (and I use the term quite loosely) that I am no hunter for baiting hogs and sitting in a stand to wait for them apparently because I don't hunt the way they think I should be hunting. It seems that many of the hunting folks can be just as much jerks about terminology as the tree huggers.

So given the way I go about my business and doing it for the reason of eliminating a threat, I am a hog sniper. Of course that then makes another segment of gun folks upset because I haven't been to military sniping school. :eek:

Art Eatman
November 18, 2011, 09:29 AM
Nothing wrong with "harvest" per se. My gripe is about its use to avoid the perceived harshness--to me, the reality--of "kill". The avoidance is what I see as PC.

But then, I've always thought of harvesting wheat or oats or corn--and never of the word as applied to any sort of meat. I don't think of harvesting fish or chickens, so why apply it to deer? :D

jason_iowa
November 18, 2011, 10:18 AM
Boy some people can blame liberals for anything. I'm a bleeding heart, tree hugging liberal. Tree hugging in the sense that I think our woods and waters are more important then industrial progress. I would think every outdoors man would be for the protection of our natural resources. Liberal does not equal anti gun/hunting. Don't lump the uneducated masses in with good progressive liberals.

No one is pro cruelty to animals. People in peta may be liberal according to them but not all liberals or even the majority are involved in peta. Horrid organization that does nothing to prevent the suffering of animals. I know of no hunters who are cruel to animals quite the opposite in fact. Many hunters have a great deal of respect for the animals they hunt.

Legionnaire
November 18, 2011, 10:55 AM
The word "harvest" has nothing to do with political correctness and everything to do with game management. This. Whether you "like" the use of the word or not is your personal choice. Use it if you like, don't if you don't. As a hunter safety instructor who taught game management as part of the curriculum, I used "harvest" regularly. But we also talked about "humane kills."

Similarly, the use of "Xmas" is of Christian origin, "X" being the first letter of "Christ" in Greek. It's an abbreviation, not an attempt to "X Christ out of Christmas."

I'm reminded of Ronald Reagan, who said, "The trouble with our liberal friends is not that they are ignorant, but that they know so much that isn't so." In this instance, drop "liberal" and insert "hunting."

Double Naught Spy
November 18, 2011, 04:47 PM
Whether you "like" the use of the word or not is your personal choice. Use it if you like, don't if you don't.

Oh but see, you have completely misunderstood the problem. It isn't about whether or not people like terms as much as it is about how people want to perceive themselves or to perceive themselves relative to others.

But then, I've always thought of harvesting wheat or oats or corn--and never of the word as applied to any sort of meat. I don't think of harvesting fish or chickens, so why apply it to deer?

Right.

When the "hunters" describe others engaging in the taking of game in manners that the "hunters" don't perceive as being sufficiently to their high standards, they proclaim the others to be "harvesters." It is a put down, an insult, used to set apart the top tier "hunters" from lower tier "harvesters." It is a perspective those who perceive themselves as engaging in real hunting from those who are just pretend hunters. Hunting, as we all know, involves much skill and hardship whereas harvesting, like wheat or oats, is fairly simple and requiring few perceived hunting skills. You just go out and get what you need and the wheat and oats don't run or hide from you.

I have also noticed that some of the self proclaimed "real" hunters wear their title as a badge of pride but also as an explanation for a lack of success. After all, anybody can harvest, but only a few are truly skilled in the ways of hunting where the procurment of game resides in the realm of the wisdom and skill of the hunter as well as the craftiness of the prey which is indeed sometime victorious. "I tracked and stalked a 400 lb 72 point whitetail for 36 hours, but they don't grow that big by being stupid. Just before I was about to get my shot at him, the wind changed [its always the wind in these stories, isn't it] and he must of gotten a whiff of me and he bolted before I could pull the trigger. Otherwise, he never would of known I was there."

One thing is certain, the "hunters" are better story tellers...:D

rickyrick
November 18, 2011, 04:58 PM
My following statement in no way reflects all deer/elk/antler bearing animal hunters.

There is a lot of snobery that goes with a lot of these hunters. But us regular fellows usually grin and bear it until they leave town and head back to the law offices and such.

I love reading and hearing these hunting stories. So don't get me wrong, but most of yall know what I am saying

sc outdoorsman
November 18, 2011, 05:36 PM
I plant food plots for the deer to harvest so I can kill them.;)

I can honestly say the word harvest has never crossed my mind when I am hunting. A steady aim and slow squeeze on the trigger so I can get a clean harvest doesn't work for me.

shortwave
November 19, 2011, 07:28 AM
DNS,

Your post, as usual, is filled with much wisdom with a dash of BS. :D

Too, as usual, a pleasure to read. ;)

Art Eatman
November 19, 2011, 08:30 AM
"Huntin'? Lemme tell ya 'bout huntin', boy. I kilt me a big ol' buck, one time, and got curious about where he'd been. I went to tracking back along his trail. I plumb forgot about the time and kep' on keepin' on. 'Fore ya know it, I'd tracked him all the way back to where he wuz borned!"

Sorry. Couldn't resist. It's just another character flaw. :D

Sport45
November 19, 2011, 09:37 AM
Maybe it should have been †-mas?

Harvesting, shooting, taking, getting, killing, all work the same for me when it comes to collecting game.

ZeroJunk
November 19, 2011, 10:26 AM
Anybody is free to call any of it whatever they want as far as I'm concerned.

shortwave
November 19, 2011, 11:24 AM
The short 'ebonics' version would be:

I did da smak down on da Dee wit da macky d Gat.

Couldn't resist.

Me either. :D

Pahoo
November 19, 2011, 12:03 PM
I did da smak down on da Dee wit da macky d Gat.
I guess it's not what you say, but how you say it !! ... ;)

Thanks Shortwave and;

Be Safe !!!

hooligan1
November 19, 2011, 06:30 PM
I can't attest to the way people should or shouldn't say they got a good buck.


But here's my shot,,,,,,,,, I kilt this'en at sevem this morn!!;) with my Savage 110 .270 win, 53 grns of H4350, 130 grn Nosler Accubond. The shot hit him high shoulder, complete pass through! Heart had damage to the top and the lungs were smoked, the exit hole was no larger than a nickle.;)

Cowboy_mo
November 19, 2011, 09:51 PM
and that gentleman is how you tell a deer hunting story!!!!!!!!!!

Political correctness has ruined our country ........

huntinaz
November 19, 2011, 10:30 PM
Hey Hooligan, that there's a real nice'n!

Archer 9505
November 20, 2011, 01:29 PM
Politically correct vs. politically incorrect. It seems if you say "Kill" or "Christmas" there will be a crowd of thin skins ready to jump on you for your insensitivity. Conversely if you say "Harvest" or "Holiday Season" there will be an equally thin skinned crowd ready to declare you a PC liberal. I think both groups are over thinking the issue. Compare the following sentences.

1. Last year's deer harvest of 500,000 set a new record for the state.

2. Last year's 500,000 deer killed set a new record for the state.

The first sentence is implicit that the deer killed were via intentional, legal means (harvest). Perhaps not legal but certainly as a result of intentional human action.

The second sentence is ambiguous. What killed the deer? Cars? Coyotes? Winter Kill? A combination of all factors?

Harvest makes clear with a single word that we are talking about legal hunting methods.

Ok, I'm probably over thinking the issue. If you want to say "Harvest" do so, if you prefer "Killed", fine. I use both depending on context. If you feel the need to correct me or lable me because I said one or the other, well go !@#$ yourself.

Double Naught Spy
November 20, 2011, 02:57 PM
Harvest makes clear with a single word that we are talking about legal hunting methods.

LOL, no it doesn't. "Harvest" doesn't indicate one way or the other if the method of taking game is legal when referring to what a hunter has done.

As with "kill" or "take" or any other such words, "harvest" has not value relative to legality.

For example... http://www.kait8.com/story/16011790/hunters-hoping-for-positive-deer-population-ahead-of-season

"With all these activities, basically these guys are stealing opportunities from legal hunters," said Langston. "As you can see sitting here in front of me, these are just an example of some of the deer killed in this county that have been illegally harvested."

The word "harvested" could be substituted with the words of "killed" or "taken" or "hunted" without changing the context one iota.

Archer 9505
November 20, 2011, 03:50 PM
LOL, no it doesn't. "Harvest" doesn't indicate one way or the other if the method of taking game is legal when referring to what a hunter has done.

As with "kill" or "take" or any other such words, "harvest" has not value relative to legality

OK, I concede your point.
My broader point is, "harvest" is just a word available through the English lexicon.

So don't set your hair on fire if someone uses "Harvest" instead of kill or visa versa.

Pahoo
November 20, 2011, 03:59 PM
The first sentence is implicit that the deer killed were via intentional, legal means (harvest)
When documented or published, it usually comes from the DNR or state conservation group. Regardless of what term is used, it is always refering to "legally taken means". I also know they track road kills and estimate what is taken by illegal means but that is a separate catagory. .... ;)

Now if PITA was publishing this information they would call it something completely different. ... ;)

Doesn't matter what term anyone uses but I view those who use Harvesting as apologizing for what is really happening and that is killing deer. ;)


Be Safe !!!

Double Naught Spy
November 20, 2011, 06:28 PM
When I googled "harvest" and "deer" and "harvest" with other animals, I was quite surprised to find that many states issues hunting licenses for harvesting deer and other game...which only seems to muddy the already muddy waters of distinction between the terms.

http://www.google.com/imgres?um=1&hl=en&rlz=1T4TSNA_enUS361US436&biw=1120&bih=573&tbm=isch&tbnid=KiMIFtEt6vUY7M:&imgrefurl=http://www.dcnr.state.al.us/hunting/season-limits/&docid=RE1rk6W5JMGvpM&imgurl=http://www.dcnr.state.al.us/images/image/WFF%252520Admin/harvest%252520record.jpg&w=1700&h=1200&ei=QYvJTqWGKaz2sQLSuYWWDQ&zoom=1&iact=rc&dur=485&sig=108416460358817463034&page=1&tbnh=99&tbnw=140&start=0&ndsp=20&ved=1t:429,r:10,s:0&tx=74&ty=60

So hunting, trapping, and catching are what you do to procure game, but any game taken is considered harvest?

Brian Pfleuger
November 20, 2011, 07:22 PM
When you hunt a deer and kill it, you have harvested the animal.

I don't know about other places but farmers around here don't say they're "harvesting corn". They say they're picking it or cutting it or combining it.... After its done, they say they "harvested" the corn. Same with other crops.

Same with deer. They're just another crop. You hunt them, you kill them, you harvest them.

Corn, deer, whatever.

cnimrod
November 20, 2011, 09:20 PM
for our sport the word you use is dependent on your audience. Take, kill, get, catch whatever but harvest does make it sound too easy like you could just walk into the woods and they're standing around waiting for you to shoot em. And that plays into the anti's who say, there's no sport in hunting anyone can do that.

shortwave
November 20, 2011, 10:06 PM
And that plays into the anti's who say, there's no sport in hunting anyone can do that

Apparently ODNR(Ohio Dept. of Nat. Resources) doesn't care what the anti's think since both the words kill and harvest are in our Regs. handbook.

The word 'harvest', when referring game that has been taken, is throughout ' The Ohio Hunting and Trapping Regulation' handbook.

I.E. Deer Checking:
1.Only the person who kills the deer can present it to the check station. All deer must be checked in the county of harvest or adjacent county.

2. Deer must be checked by 8:00p.m. on the day of harvest....

...just a few examples. Have also glimpsed at a few other states Regs handbook and found the grammar to be in the same manor.

Who would have thunk that there would have been this much thought into this topic. :confused:

Double Naught Spy
November 20, 2011, 10:18 PM
So all these great "hunters" are apparently "harvesters" whether they like it or not, eh?

shortwave
November 21, 2011, 09:10 AM
So all these great "hunters" are apparently "harvesters" whether they like it or not, eh?

Yep... and as a comforting thought, there's a great book out called 'Don't Sweat the Small Stuff'. :D

rickyrick
November 21, 2011, 09:14 AM
Here's a few hunting terms for you

Deer = harvest or wildlife management
Pig= removed from ecosystems
Coyote = silence a voice
Raccoon = sweet justice
Exotic = wildlife diversification

Daryl
November 22, 2011, 08:24 AM
hate that term. I never use it. It would make me feel like I'm kissing some tree hugger's a**. No more X-mas in stores. Now it's the "holidays". This politically correct crap stuff is starting to get so rediculous. "We're going to harvest a deer!" Wheeeee.



I don't use it either, but don't make much of a big deal out of it.

I "pick" vegetables in the garden, and shoot, or kill animals when I hunt.

Seems so simple.

And to me, it's Christmas, not x-mas.

Daryl

The Kill Dozer
December 12, 2011, 11:23 PM
The "X" comes from the Greek letter Chi, which is the first letter of the Greek word Χριστός, translated as "Christ".

The X isn't taking "Christ" out of Christmas! It means the same thing! I personally would prefer leaving it as Christmas, but Xmas is a whole lot better than "Happy Holidays!" :mad: That really just ticks me off!!
Haha Sorry Thought I would help clear things up:D

Ridgerunner665
December 12, 2011, 11:33 PM
In reference to deer (and other edible game)...Where I come from we still kill it, cook it, and eat it.

And its still Christmas here too...

Redneck hillbilly and proud of it...:D