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fortkevin2
November 7, 2011, 09:04 PM
Just curious if you guys could tell me some more about a J. Stevens Model 235 shotgun....Side by Side 12ga has a 28” barrel. The overall length of the barrel is 44 ½”. Exposed hammers, double triggers.

That's all I really know about it and was wondering approx. when it was made, how many made, value etc. If I can provide more info which would help you please let me know. Thanks

http://i698.photobucket.com/albums/vv350/Fortkevin2/shotgun.jpg

http://i698.photobucket.com/albums/vv350/Fortkevin2/shotgun5.jpg

http://i698.photobucket.com/albums/vv350/Fortkevin2/shotgun34.jpg

http://i698.photobucket.com/albums/vv350/Fortkevin2/shotgun1.jpg

http://i698.photobucket.com/albums/vv350/Fortkevin2/shotgun3-1.jpg

http://i698.photobucket.com/albums/vv350/Fortkevin2/shotgun3.jpg

darkgael
November 8, 2011, 10:32 AM
Info:
the 235 was made from 1912-1915, ALL shotgun making stopped 1916, resumed 1920, and the model 235 ended production in 1932. The "Arms & Tool" name was not used after 1915, so you have somewhere between 1912-1915.
So, If it is marked "J. Stevens Arms and Tool Co.", it was made, as noted, between 1912 and 1915. If it is marked "J. Stevens Arms Co", it was made between 1920-1932.
Pete

Goatwhiskers
November 8, 2011, 10:32 AM
Zero info in my limited references. It would appear from the photos that it was restocked at some time, poor lower tang fit, same at rear of forend, but no matter. I would advise that you have a competent 'smith check for Damascus barrels, also for chamber length as some early guns were chambered for shorter lengths. Here endeth the lesson. Goatwhiskers

Edit: I should add that Damascus is not likely, but chamber length definitely should be checked--I don't know exactly when the industry standardized lengths. Goat

zippy13
November 8, 2011, 11:49 AM
I can't tell, is the stock split behind the tang screw?

fortkevin2
November 10, 2011, 03:33 PM
It does look to be split. Ill have to measure the chambers to see if they are 2 3/4. If so, is this shotgun able to handle light field loads?

BigJimP
November 10, 2011, 05:18 PM
You need to be asking these questions of an experienced gunsmith - not on a forum - where none of us can physically look at the gun in detail.

and in my opinion - you need to let someone measure the chambers that knows what they are doing....

I mean no disrespect, but even considering shooting the gun until it is checked ...is foolish, in my opinion - even with light loads - Its just not a smart choice ...you could get hurt !! - and remember a shotshell is measured after its fired - in terms of its length ( so don't measure a shell before its fired - against the chamber length and think its ok).

If you don't want to pay a qualified gunsmith to check the gun -- then in my opinion, its a "wall hanger" and I woldn't fire it - or let anyone else fire it if it were mine.

classicshotgunner
November 10, 2011, 06:08 PM
The shotgun looks to have the original wood furniture except it's been harshly refinished (with quite a bit of wood removed in doing so) at some point. Notice on the stock what looks like the checkering on the pistol grip part of the stock has been sanded to the point that almost all of it has been removed, and the forend has no corners. They have been sanded to the point of being rounded. The barrel's chambers should measure to fit 2 3/4 inch shells and will handle standard 12 GA. 2 3/4 inch loads. That is if the complete shotgun is tight, locks up good and tight with no head spacing problems, and passes a gunsmiths check. The barrels aren't Damascus steel. I have a J. Stevens Arms & Tool model 335 double without the external hammers that is older than this shotgun and it's chamber measures OK for 2 3/4 inch shells and handles the standard 2 3/4 inch shells from most any well known maker well. Each barrel of your shotgun should have a different choke size such as full in one and modified in the other, or modified in one and improved/open cylinder in the other. Rarely did both barrels come with the same choke size. It being a 12 GA., you can check the chokes in the barrels with a dime coin. If a dime put down the barrel catches and won't exit the barrel's muzzle, it most likely has a full choke. That is a quick way of checking. Measuring the barrel's bore size, then measuring the muzzle end (choke) size will tell you the % of constriction and there by giving you the true choke size each barrel has. The years for date of manufacture of the shotgun that's been given to you on this thread fall into about the right time frame.