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beemerb
November 4, 2000, 08:17 PM
I found one of these at a local shop.Very ornate,German maufacture.There seems to be a peice missing that threads into the end of the barrel.At least there are threads there to have something screwed into it.Any info would be appreciated as the price seems cheap.

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Bob--- Age and deceit will overcome youth and speed.
I'm old and deceitful.

James K
November 4, 2000, 08:38 PM
If you examine the gun, you may find that the "piece that screws in" IS the barrel. many of those had a short barrel that had a loading chamber; the rest of the "barrel" housed the long firing pin and trigger bar.

I have no idea where parts could be obtained.

Jim

beemerb
November 4, 2000, 10:30 PM
Had a idea that might be the case.What did the thing shoot?The diameter of the firing pin looks like its allmost a 1/4 inch.Any idea of what it is worth missing the barrel?

------------------
Bob--- Age and deceit will overcome youth and speed.
I'm old and deceitful.

Mike Irwin
November 4, 2000, 11:11 PM
Bee,

These things normally shot Flobert caps, a sort of kissing cousin to the .22 BB Cap.

In essence, it was a primer with a lead ball seated in it.

I'll try to upload a picture of a Flobert cap (actually made by the Flobert company) that I have in my collection. I just have to remember to borrow the digital camera from a friend.

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Smith & Wesson is dead to me.

If you want a Smith & Wesson, buy USED!

beemerb
November 5, 2000, 11:04 AM
Mike thanks.I have a photo with specs in one of my cartridges of the world.

------------------
Bob--- Age and deceit will overcome youth and speed.
I'm old and deceitful.

James K
November 6, 2000, 12:43 AM
Many of the Flobert guns had no firing pin as we think of it. The whole breechblock (which was often just the hammer) simply drove forward and struck the base of the case. The forward inertia of the breechblock kept the lid on with the low pressure round. In fact, some of the early Flobert rounds really had no rim, just a kind of taper. Smith and Wesson get credit for the rim, as they wanted to use the ammo in a revolver and couldn't easily have a huge breechblock slamming around. They also put some powder in the round and the .22 Short was born.

Jim

Harley Nolden
November 7, 2000, 08:45 AM
Parlor Gun: Zimmer (room) Schutzer:

After the war, Germany was not allowed to have large caliber rifles, however, consideration was given that they could rechamber these large caliber guns to a smaller calliber and use them as target rifles.

Many of these guns were originally 8.15X46R caliber and were then "sleeved" to accept and shoot the smaller caliber ctg. As the caliber was such it could be shot indoors, (Zimmer-Parlor) and tgts were designed to shoot at reduced ranges. I have owened several of these over the years and they are really a work of art.

Target shooting in Germany is and was very popular and this provided local and national competitions to continue.

This restriction on rifles was also carried over to the Mauser Rifles left over. As the Germans were allowed to have shotguns, many 98 Mausers were rebarreled and conveted to the various shotgun gauges.

After WWII restrictions placed on the Germans to, manufacture military rifles. However, they could manufacture sporting rifles and shotguns. This prompted Germany to rebarrel and convert the M1898 Mauser rifle to a two shot shotgun. This shotgun was produced in, 12, 16, and 20 gauge.

These shotguns were eventually imported into the US and sold on the open market.I have personally owned one of these shotguns and found it to make and excellent slug gun.

[This message has been edited by Harley Nolden (edited November 07, 2000).]