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Mike Irwin
November 2, 2000, 03:37 PM
My uncle is going to give me my Grandfather's revolvers.

The one is made by the US Revolver Co., which I know was a house brand for Iver Johnson.

The other one, however, appears to be a typical top-break double action from the turn of the century, but the name, Columbian, is unfamiliar to me. According to my uncle, the gun is also stamped Philadelphia.

Anyone ever hear of this make? I'm suspecting that it's another house brand, but who made it?

I haven't seen these guns in years, this is what my Uncle told me on the phone. I'm going to get them at Christmas, so I'll have better information then.



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Smith & Wesson is dead to me.

If you want a Smith & Wesson, buy USED!

Steven Mace
November 2, 2000, 11:22 PM
Mike, the gun you're actually describing is the Columbian Automatic. This was a .38 caliber top-break revolver made by Foehl & Weeks in Philadelphia during the 1890's. Hope this helps!

Steve Mace

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After today, its all historical

Mike Irwin
November 3, 2000, 10:48 AM
Steve,

That more than helps. I've NEVER heard of this maker, and I thought I knew more than a little bit about gun makers in this era!

Any thoughts on them? Quality, current value, etc?

I'm suspecting that it's like many of the other similar guns of the time.

------------------
Smith & Wesson is dead to me.

If you want a Smith & Wesson, buy USED!

James K
November 3, 2000, 10:07 PM
IIRC, those were quite inexpensive guns and of no special quality. The term "automatic" at the time meant "automatic ejection", i.e., the ejection of all the cartridges when the gun was opened.

I suggest you treat it as a family heirloom and not as a usable revolver.

Jim

Steven Mace
November 4, 2000, 12:54 AM
I have to agree with Jim on all counts. The term 'automatic' was in reference to the ejection of the cartridges upon opening. And these were inexpensive handguns of maybe average quality. Today in very good condition a Columbian Automatic might be worth about $200. I would definitely agree that today it should be handled as an heirloom and not a shooter. Hope this helps!

Steve Mace

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After today, its all historical

Mike Irwin
November 4, 2000, 02:11 PM
Jim & Steve,

Oh yeah, I'm familiar with the term "automatic" as applied to these old guns.

That's why we have the term "Hand Ejector" to describe swing-cylinder Smith & Wessons. :)

I have no intention of shooting these guns, although my uncle apparently has a bunch of ammo that my Grandfather had with them. I'll probably put them in a shadow box.

Nothing special, except that they were my Grandfathers.

------------------
Smith & Wesson is dead to me.

If you want a Smith & Wesson, buy USED!