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View Full Version : Does anyone practice feeling their loaded chamber indicator in the dark?


C0untZer0
June 11, 2011, 09:50 AM
Just wondering...

TailGator
June 11, 2011, 10:10 AM
I pay just about zero attention to my pistol's loaded chamber indicator, trusting far more to visual and tactile checks to the chamber itself.

That is a straight answer, but the other answers are going to be a lot more fun to read.:D

JC57
June 11, 2011, 10:37 AM
Not me.

nogo
June 11, 2011, 10:45 AM
No.

Frank Ettin
June 11, 2011, 10:49 AM
Nor do I --

But I do practice a type of press check without looking, as follows:

[1] Follow rule THREE and keep your finger off the trigger and outside the trigger guard. 



[2] With the weak hand, grasps the slide with the thumb and middle finger on the REAR serrations and the index finger resting on the barrel hood.



[3] Pull the slide back slightly. Something between a quarter and a half and inch should do it.



[4] Allow the index finger to drop down into the space between the end of the barrel hood and the breech face. If there was a round in the chamber, you will feel it.


C0untZer0
June 11, 2011, 10:52 AM
I pay just about zero attention to my pistol's loaded chamber indicator, trusting far more to visual and tactile checks to the chamber itself.

Are you talking about the chamber indicator mainly as verifying that a firearm is unloaded?

I wouldn't advise anyone to use the indicator to verify an unloaded status... it should be cleared - drop magazine, lock the slide back, look inside the chamber etc...

I'm thinking more in terms of using the loaded chamber indicator to verify that you have a round in the chamber, like when you hear something in the middle of the night and you think you're going to have to arm yourself...

hogdogs
June 11, 2011, 01:54 PM
I disable the LCI from all guns I buy that has one.

Just one more mechanical item to fail. And in many, if not most, instances, the LCI is actually in contact with the round and any thing I can do to reduce possible friction or binding is a good thing.

Brent

RedNeckChris
June 11, 2011, 02:16 PM
I've never even understood the purpose in those things.
If you don't know or can't remember the status of your pistol, you maybe should think about a new, less complicated choice in weapon (muzzle loader maybe?).

Seriously... I'd have to question the safety habits of anyone who relies on some kind of "indicator" to know whether a round is chambered or not. Have you chambered a round? Then the chamber is loaded. Have you not yet chambered a round? Then in that case the chamber is empty. Are you in doubt? Then for Christ's sake, stop drinking so much and start practicing some basic gun safety. Right?

Chamber indicators are another misguided attempt (along with action locks and "safety's") to force safe gun handling on people who have no business owning a gun.

cambeul41
June 11, 2011, 03:05 PM
Practice? That is ambiguous. Use it? Yes. Trust? No. Depend on? Certainly not.

Visual and tactile checks I trust. Memory? Of course I think I remember, but there is a rule about treating all guns as loaded for a reason.

Don P
June 11, 2011, 05:11 PM
Does anyone practice feeling their loaded chamber indicator in the dark?
What does one do if the said handgun does not have a loaded chamber indicator?????:confused::eek:

bigghoss
June 11, 2011, 07:11 PM
my HD gun gets checked BEFORE the lights go out.

ClydeFrog
June 11, 2011, 09:44 PM
I would learn & practice the SAS(Special Air Service) method, point the muzzle in a safe direction, keep your firing hand index finger OFF the trigger, pull the slide back slightly & feel the round in the pistol chamber. You can learn to do it by feel w/o looking down(as you watch or scan for serious threats) or be able to safely check a pistol's condition in low light.
Former 22nd SAS trooper Andy McNab(who is the subject of the film/book Bravo Two Zero; www.IMDb.com ) now works as a entertainment industry consultant(Heat, Colaterial) & instructs actors in this practical skill.

Archie
June 11, 2011, 09:52 PM
If my handgun is on me for carry purposes, I loaded it before I started. (I always silently - at least quietly - sigh when TV shows or movies have the 'entry team' stop just outside a doorway and check guns. This is NOT the time!)

At home, dang near everything is loaded anyway. I live practically alone and there are no children to fiddle with things.

orionengnr
June 11, 2011, 09:56 PM
No.
I do not own a pistol with an LCI, and that is by design.

I do not load-and-unload my carry firearm. It is loaded, it stays loaded and I do not perform "administrative handling".

If it is empty I have shot it dry...in which case I reload.
The other time is if I am cleaning it.

MLeake
June 11, 2011, 09:59 PM
I'm not sure how often LCI's might stick (the mechanical variety), but I'm not sure I'd want to place 100% faith in them.

(I have LCI's on my PX4 pistols, but still tend to do press-checks.)

The only LCI I find myself paying any attention to is on the S&W M&P9, and that's because it's a hole over the back part of the chamber. You can actually see cartridge brass. (Not useful as a tactile check, though.)

RedNeckChris
June 11, 2011, 10:24 PM
Visual and tactile checks I trust. Memory? Of course I think I remember, but there is a rule about treating all guns as loaded for a reason.

If you're so paranoid you won't even trust your own memory to tell you the current condition of the chamber, why would you trust your eyes and/or fingertip? And after performing a check, you immediately begin relying on your memory anyway. You have to "remember" whether you saw/felt a round in there right? If you can't remember from moment to moment what you saw, maybe you should use an LCI.

Safety checks aren't what we're discussing here right? I think what countzero meant was do you practice feeling for the indicator so that if ever confronted with a situation (such as nighttime intruder) where you need to use your pistol in the dark and don't know what condition it's in, you'll be able to discreetly find out without making any noise or otherwise alerting the BG. That's the only possible situation I can think of when an indicator might be useful. And in that case, visual and/or tactile checks (press checks ETC.) aren't appropriate (or necessary I would hope). If you feel like you can go ahead and open the slide to feel around for bullets without putting yourself in more danger, than by all means...feel away. Hell, why stop there? Why not go ahead and give that thing a good cleaning and lube job while you're at it to make sure everything's gonna' function smoothly. But assuming you need to be as quiet and sneaky as possible to avoid getting shot at, maybe it would be better to know ahead of time what you have in your hand.

In any case, the whole thing's a hopeless situation for lots of reasons. If you don't know whether the chamber's empty or loaded, how can you be sure the magazine's loaded. Or if you even have a magazine inserted. How can you be sure you don't have the action/trigger locked? Or that the you're even holding a real gun for that matter?

But assuming you're crafty enough to know the condition of the magazine well, the magazine, the action/trigger lock and whether your gun is real or not, you're probably also going to know whether you need to rack the slide or not. And if you're serious about self defense and have no kids or other irresponsible people around, I would hope your bedside protection is in ready-to-rock mode. If, on the other hand, you have kids/knuckleheads living with you, I would hope you need to do more than just rack the slide to get your pistol ready for action. Things like: opening the safe or unlocking the action/trigger.

Putting aside things like "always assume it's loaded" and "check the chamber then check it again" Etc., who here doesn't know the EXACT condition of every gun in your collection?

I own several long guns, four revolvers and two pistols. The long guns are all unloaded and locked up. Three of my four revolvers and one pistol are also unloaded and locked. My stainless S&W is currently loaded with 6 Hydroshocks, unlocked and ready to go in my nightstand. My .45 is on my hip, action unlocked, fully loaded (including the chamber), and ready to go with just a flick of the safety. I bet most people on this forum could state the current condition of every firearm they own. And nobody would have to look at any indicators or open any actions. God! At least I hope so.

BGutzman
June 11, 2011, 10:43 PM
If Im carrying it then its loaded, if Im not then its locked up..

RedNeckChris
June 12, 2011, 05:18 AM
If my handgun is on me for carry purposes, I loaded it before I started. (I always silently - at least quietly - sigh when TV shows or movies have the 'entry team' stop just outside a doorway and check guns. This is NOT the time!)

That's what I'm talkin' about!

Screw last minute press checks and visual/tactile LCI's. Your brain, when used properly, is the only thing you need to ascertain the condition of your weapon.

Using the controversial "remembering what the hell you've done today" method (along with some basic gun safety) is an absolutely fail-safe way to ensure you don't shoot yourself in the groin or make clicking noises when you should be making BANG-BANG noises.

TailGator
June 12, 2011, 10:24 AM
I'm thinking more in terms of using the loaded chamber indicator to verify that you have a round in the chamber, like when you hear something in the middle of the night and you think you're going to have to arm yourself...

In that sort of situation, I know a round is chambered because a round is always chambered. There is value in having routines and always keeping a defensive firearm in the same status, whether that status is chambered or unchambered. That, to me, is more reliable than relying on what is, to me, the subtle change in the LCI on my defensive pistol.

MLeake
June 12, 2011, 02:12 PM
For the people who say, "I always carry chambered," that's great.

I wish I could agree with you, but unfortunately I can't say I always carry chambered. I have friends in similar circumstances.

Pilots who carry (contractors, FFDO's, etc) may have restrictions against having a chambered round while in the aircraft.

Some security departments have mandated chamber-empty carry.

On my own time, I carry chambered, or I carry revolvers. But my habit patterns have been muddled due to work.

On a separate note, the first guy who taught me to do press-checks was a USMC GySgt, who was the firearms instructor for a Navy security department I was briefly attached to, a couple decades ago. If Marines do press-checks, I'd think they'd be good enough for RedNeckChris, but maybe those Marines are pansies....

JerryM
June 12, 2011, 06:30 PM
No, I keep them loaded unless in the safe, and even then I leave some loaded instead of having to cycle ammo. I always have a sticky sign in the case that says, "LOADED."

I would hate to think I would hear something in the night and have to wonder if my gun was loaded.
Jerry

kozak6
June 12, 2011, 07:34 PM
No. But I incidentally don't have a pistol equipped with an LCI. Not purposely, that's just the way it's worked out.

I guess it's nice if your pistol has one, but I think if you keep a pistol for defense, you really need to know if it's loaded or not. If your routine is so sloppy you don't know if your pistol is loaded, that's not what an LCI is for and I don't know how much it will help you, or if you even have any business with a pistol at all.

I think the primary purpose of an LCI is a (hopefully) cheap feature to keep lawyers happy more so than for any intrinsic safety purpose.

jimbob86
June 12, 2011, 07:50 PM
My gun's LCI is a tiny slot in the barrel hood: can't feel anything through that.

My $.02: If I am unsure if my gun is loaded (maybe I just woke up from sleepwalking or I just took it back from a space alien, or something equally likely ........ then I'd do a mag change and a modified press check........

FireForged
June 12, 2011, 09:26 PM
nah, I dont really trust it and would rather not rely on them.

ClydeFrog
June 12, 2011, 10:25 PM
In the entertainment industry it's called; "artistic license" or "suspended disbelief". ;)

In many film-TV productions, directors/producers/actors/prop masters etc use different methods to propel the story or heighten the drama. Sound FX, CGI(computer images), prop or fake guns, lighting, etc all add to the final scene.
If you ever saw a action or police film/tv production you know there are a lot of complex factors involved.

mbquimby
June 12, 2011, 10:30 PM
I do, kind of. I have a habit of sliding my finger over the slide when I adjust my holster or just desk the need to make sure the gun is still there...I know it is, obviously, but it's nice to give it a tape from time to time. I carry an DE which has a great loaded chamber indicator that is super easy to feel.

Steviewonder1
June 12, 2011, 11:17 PM
Yes, I do with my twin G-19's. My Colt Python is always fully loaded so no need to check.

Nnobby45
June 12, 2011, 11:32 PM
I'm very much in the habit of checking my chamber to verify it's condition.

I realize that packing an unloaded gun around all day has never happened to so many on the board who hand out advice, but I check my chamber on a regular basis.

And yes, I use a simple method that can easily and quickly feel the round in the dark.

If others feel that they couldn't possibly have, somehow, forgot to make their pistol ready and that "it's always loaded-no need to check", than that's their call.

I suspect such individuals would jump out of air planes without checking their parachute harness or static line, because they're always ready to go. Or drive off without checking their trailer hitch, 'cause it was ok last time they used it.

In addition, for those who dry fire a lot with snap caps, a visual check before you leave the house is a good idea, since an A-Zoom in the chamber wouldn't be of much use and just feeling the round wouldn't detect it. :cool:

40caljustice
June 13, 2011, 12:08 AM
I know my gun is loaded but it just feels a little reassuring to rub my hand across the LCI. I even press it firmly so if it was unloaded but stuck I would know. This is after a couple visual checks which are the safest and most surefire way to know if your firearm is loaded.

I remember my grandpa saying that the only way he unloads his gun is a few seconds before a reload. His stays loaded 24/7. Mine typically do also unless I'm cleaning it or showing it.

Nnobby45
June 13, 2011, 06:16 AM
Mine typically do also unless I'm cleaning it or showing it.



Ah, yes. And prudent it would be to check it before you arm yourself to make sure you loaded it back up after you cleaned it.

Our minds will play tricks on us. We'll start to do something then get distracted--such as when the phone rings--and our minds "remember" doing it, when in fact we only started to, but never did. That's happened to each and every one of us, though maybe not with loaded guns----yet.

A high % of NDs happen after one finishes dry firing, loads the gun back up, sets it back down, then when the gun owner comes back from doing something else and sees the gun sitting there, he picks it up to resume "dry" firing and the gun goes bang.

We should ALWAYS check the gun when we pick it up after it's been sitting to verify it's in the condition we want it in.

I always thought that was gun safety 101, and checking our life saving equipment to make sure it's loaded is just part of that.

Just my thoughts on the matter.:cool:

JerryM
June 13, 2011, 08:31 AM
I sure would hate to have to start checking my gun in the dark when I thought an intruder was attempting entry or had already entered.

Again, I leave it loaded and never unload it except for the occasional check and clean. That is not even once a month. My bedside gun is a Mak. It is in a fanny pack beside my bed, and if I had to roll off the bed I do not want to start checking to see if it loaded. The fanny pack is unzipped, but available if I get a knock on the door.

Anyway, I suspect none of us will ever really need to repel an intruder in the middle of the night. At least not me with my security doors.

Regards,
Jerry

WC145
June 13, 2011, 03:38 PM
I don't own any guns with loaded chamber indicators that you can feel.
I keep my carry guns loaded but always double check visually before I put one into use, either for carry or nightstand duty.

Nnobby45
June 13, 2011, 08:02 PM
I sure would hate to have to start checking my gun in the dark when I thought an intruder was attempting entry or had already entered.

Good grief. If you're referring to my posts, I didn't mention any specific tactics with regards to when and where you should do a chamber check. And certainly didn't suggest that the first thing you should do when Bubba breaks down your door at 3AM is grab your pistol and see if it's loaded.

Just saying that knowing how to quickly verify that your gun is loaded in daylight or dark is a simple and basic practice and useful in a number of circumstances.

It's taught in Farnum's courses to everyone--- newbies and experienced shooters alike. A smimple technique that works with any semi-auto on the planet.

OK, now tell me honestly, some of you "my gun's always loaded I don't need to check it" folks that if a Sheriff Deputy knocked on your day and said they were searching for two dangerous criminals in your neighborhood that you wouldn't verify that your pistol was loaded after you strapped it on. And then checked your long gun.

Nitesites
June 13, 2011, 08:08 PM
Well, I haven't practiced this in low/no-light but am familiar with the loaded chamber indicators on my Glocks by tactile feel alone. All the rest of my handguns require press checking.

cambeul41
June 13, 2011, 08:32 PM
RedNeckChris in post 16 --

Where did you earn your degree in psychology?

A lot of people have died because someone thought they knew a gun was unloaded. An unexpected click can be as bad as an unexpected bang.

My gun is always loaded with one in the chamber -- but I check anyway. I see what the indicator says, then I verify. I don't compulsively check and when the dog-alarm goes off, I am thinking about other things. Do you have a problem with that?

If you always trust memory and never check, please stay on your side or the river.

troy_mclure
June 13, 2011, 09:14 PM
nope, i know my guns are loaded.

TailGator
June 14, 2011, 09:51 AM
After following this thread, I found myself checking my LCI before holstering this morning. It wasn't in the dark, and I knew what the result would be, but darn if you guys didn't affect my behavior.

C0untZer0
June 14, 2011, 11:09 AM
I've actually never checked the LCI on my pistol.

The reason I asked, is that if you go to Springfield Armory's website - they highlight their XD features - Visual/Tactile Loaded Chamber Indicator & Visual/Tactile Striker Status Indicator.

So that made me wonder if there is tactical thinking / training SOPs around the LCI features.

TylerD45ACP
June 30, 2011, 01:07 AM
I practice pulling the slide back from underneath kind of pressing it while aiming at the threat. Then I use my trigger finger to feel the round in the chamber and let it fall to battery.

booker_t
June 30, 2011, 08:00 AM
I ignore the LCI.


..less complicated choice in weapon (muzzle loader maybe?).


Yeah, nobody has ever poured a double load, or loaded a second on top.

moose_nukelz
June 30, 2011, 12:23 PM
Nope, about the only time mine is unloaded is during a mag change when it runs dry or when I am cleaning it

dabo
July 1, 2011, 05:47 AM
I have no less than 5 hand guns tactically placed and hidden in my house. If I need one, it's right now, so all are locked and loaded. No need to check... Besides, Only the Taurus 24-7 has an indicator... :D

Rich Lucibella
July 1, 2011, 08:32 AM
We thought this might make a great topic for a Point/Counterpoint feature in S.W.A.T. Magazine. It appears in the July 2011 Issue. Provided here as food for thought.

The Press Check Debate (http://digital.swatmag.com/SWAT/2011/SWAT1107/?BuildGuid=a7834d5f-21b8-4439-9f12-7c16a1f987a1)

Regards-
Rich Lucibella

redstategunnut
July 1, 2011, 09:38 AM
I pay no attention whatsoever to the LCI.

My guns stay loaded, and before they go in the holster they get a press check.

Hog Red
July 1, 2011, 10:21 AM
you bet, but i prefer the wife do it. :D

Mal H
July 1, 2011, 10:37 AM
That article Rich mentioned (by Pat Rogers) is excellent, and gives about as simple an answer as there is for why to check (in light or in dark) - "Be sure, always."

Unless you've checked when you pick up your handgun, you aren't totally sure. You may think you are, but you aren't - period

Rogers gives an aircraft analogy which does apply because in the case of both flying and handgun handling, people can lose their lives if the handler isn't sure, always. For example, you always check for water in the fuel/carb, you don't skip it this time simply because you checked last time.

Boatme98
July 1, 2011, 11:34 AM
Why would I? Every gun on me or within my reach is chambered. Always.

markj
July 1, 2011, 03:03 PM
Does anyone practice feeling their loaded chamber indicator in the dark?

No. Hammer up = loaded and ready to deploy :)

Manco
July 1, 2011, 07:53 PM
For me, loaded chamber indicators are absolutely worthless and get no use whatsoever. Whenever I unload my defensive pistol for any reason, I always reload it before putting it away for immediate use, either in a holster or the pistol safe. Basically it's always loaded unless I need to unload it for a specific reason (e.g. cleaning), whereupon I'd do a press check for safety rather than relying on some device. During an actual emergency, I know that it will be loaded, so there is no need (and there may be no time anyway) to redundantly check. If for some reason I'm suddenly unsure, then I'd do a press check whenever I feel like it, but never during an emergency.

By the way, the same goes for cocking indicators (for guns that don't have external hammers). Unless I've field-stripped it for cleaning or deliberately deactivated it for some other reason, my defensive pistol is always cocked, period. Unlike all too many people I've seen, I do not have a habit of decocking pistols for no reason, so I don't worry about it--if it's in a holster or the pistol safe, then it's cocked.

Unless you've checked when you pick up your handgun, you aren't totally sure. You may think you are, but you aren't - period

Admittedly, I still have a habit of doing unnecessary press checks whenever transferring my pistol to a holster or pistol safe, just to be sure. :rolleyes: I chalk it up to having a mild case of obsessive-compulsive disorder ;), but it doesn't hurt. That said, I will never check during an emergency, when I have other things to worry about (if it doesn't fire for any reason, then I'd rack the slide anyway).

Rogers gives an aircraft analogy which does apply because in the case of both flying and handgun handling, people can lose their lives if the handler isn't sure, always. For example, you always check for water in the fuel/carb, you don't skip it this time simply because you checked last time.

Well, with airplanes any number of things could be screwed up by other people, during flight, or even by the simple passage of time, and generally I don't think that they're kept in a fully ready condition at all times. Defensive pistols are different in that they are kept in a ready condition virtually all of the time (or should be), nothing changes over time by itself (i.e. the cartridge in the chamber isn't going to gradually leak out :D), and access to them is tightly controlled (or should be). I don't think the analogy stands up for defensive pistols--any old firearm that has been lying around in the open for a while or hasn't been handled for some time, yes, but not a personal sidearm that is properly handled.

UncleLoodis
July 1, 2011, 07:57 PM
Sounds like a double entendre to me.

Regardless, no, I don't practice.

Mal H
July 1, 2011, 08:05 PM
I don't think the analogy stands up.The analogy only applies to checking things that are important each time, not airplanes vs firearms. You read far more into it than was intended.

ConlawBloganon
July 1, 2011, 08:49 PM
Uh, no. My nightstand gun is loaded. Period. I don't keep it any other way because I don't plan on bringing a poorly-formed club to meet whoever breaks down my door.

Shadi Khalil
July 1, 2011, 08:54 PM
The only time mine are not loaded is when they are being cleaned or dry fired.

TylerD45ACP
July 2, 2011, 03:20 PM
I keep my a loaded gun on me when cleaning firearms, usually the 5906 9mm then clean it last. I dont want to be caught with my pants down trying to reassemble my 1911 :eek::eek:.

RedNeckChris
July 3, 2011, 03:05 AM
cambeul41,

Apparently I've offended you in some way. I see I hurt your feelings. For that I offer my most sincere apologies. My bad bro. I feel terrible and if there's anything I can do to make it up to you, please don't hesitate to ask.

Just kidding. I don't really care about your feelings.

May I assume you're one of the guys that uses LCI's? I don't. Apparently you have a problem with that.

I thought I was clear about this (From my post #16:"Safety checks aren't what we're discussing here right?"), but let me try again:

In the one instance I feel an LCI might be an appropriate means of verifying a loaded weapon--dark and quiet house, possible intruder, need to avoid alerting intruder of presence--visual and tactile checks aren't really a good idea. How can you perform a visual check in the dark? Opening the action to feel around can possibly alert an otherwise oblivious BG to your presence and/or intentions. A much better method, in this one specific case, is the radical yet simple load-your-gun-ahead-of-time-and-remember-that-you-have-done-so method. In the unlikely event you only thought you remembered cambering a round, the unexpected click would be only slightly worse than a close quarters visual/tactile check in the dark. Both cases could possibly result in you announcing your presence to the BG.

Get it? Like most responsible, intelligent gun owners, I rely on memory to verify a LOADED weapon. I have never in my life relied on memory alone to verify an UNLOADED weapon.

If you don't understand the difference, you really aren't as safety conscious as you seem to think.

Also, if you always "verify" after "seeing what the indicator says", what the hell is the point in "seeing what the indicator says" in the first place? And after loading the chamber, seeing what the indicator says and finally "verifying", don't you then begin relying on your memory of what you did, saw and verified? The bottom line is, at some point we all MUST rely on memory. I choose to go to memory-only after loading and chambering. You choose to go to memory-only after loading, chambering, seeing what the LCI says, verifying, press checking and looking. To each his own right?

Usertag
July 3, 2011, 03:14 AM
Never... I trust my own instinct more than the Chamber Indicator. And it is common knowledge to always know when your gun is loaded and chambered.

bikerbill
July 9, 2011, 01:20 PM
No ... I check my nightstand gun each evening before I turn in; check my carry gun every day before I holster it ... IMHO those things are gimmicks like internal locks and should be avoided ... I trust my eyes way more than some little metal post sticking out of my gun ...

Jeremy
July 9, 2011, 05:13 PM
No. The gun is always loaded.

wayneinFL
July 9, 2011, 06:45 PM
I was taught to press check, and I used to do so daily. I've gotten lax about it. Over the last five or six years I have twice opened an action to find I had been carrying with an empty chamber (or empty revolver!) all day.

I don't think I own a gun with a loaded chamber indicator, except for a couple with a notch in the top of the chamber. And I can't check those by feel. To those who do check their chambers regularly, good for you. I should be doing so.

Eagle Eye
July 10, 2011, 12:54 AM
I am getting older and forgetful, so if I am feeling at all uncomfortable in a situation, I might place my hand in my pocket and feel the chambered indicator edge for confidence that she's ready. I think it is better that my wife not know when I am carrying, so I sometimes grab a holstered gun quickly when she is not looking and just slip it into my pocket. It should be ready, but I just like to discretely check.

Nnobby45
July 10, 2011, 01:31 AM
NO! I do, however, frequently retract the slide and check the chamber---by feel.:cool:

Nnobby45
July 10, 2011, 01:37 AM
No. The gun is always loaded.

So's mine, except when I'm cleaning it, dry firing, or otherwise working on it.

I check it before it goes in the holster to verify I've not forgotten to re-load it. Blessed are those who've carried for 15 years, as I have, and not at some point in all those years discovered they've been walking around with an unloaded gun. Yep, I'm a chamber checker.:cool:

Hey, what happened to our roll eyes Icon?

armsmaster270
July 10, 2011, 09:22 AM
I don't have any guns with one. Besides I know all of mine are loaded. The only time mine aren't is when they are being cleaned. On me or in the safe there is a full load +1 for the semi-autos.