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Senator
December 30, 1999, 01:45 AM
A relative of mine owns a pair of dueling pistols that I've long admired. I told her that I'd try to find out what I could about them. One of them has the name "Calverts" engraved on it; the other has "Leeds" engraved. Here's a scan of the pistols. Click on the pic for a high-res image.

<A HREF="http://home.carolina.rr.com/senator/images/Dueling_pistols_big.jpg" TARGET=_blank> http://home.carolina.rr.com/senator/images/Dueling_pistols_small.jpg </A>

Thanks in advance for any help.


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Kelly

SenatorsPlace.com (http://www.SenatorsPlace.com)

Deo Vindice

Harley Nolden
December 30, 1999, 07:45 AM
Senator:
I do not have anything on the pistols, however, as I look at the wood grips; They appear to be made of a lesser grade walnut, possibly claro walnut, (mineral stripe)and they also appear to be hand made well after the pistols were made.

The quality of the fit, wood to iron, is somewhat out of the ordinary. The finish on the wood does not seem to fit the era of the pistols.

I must admit that they are a unique pair, and with the names being differently engraved on each gun, they were possibly made for two separate people, possibly brothers.

The history on how your relative obtained the pistols, "family hand downs" would be interesting and may shed some light on the history of the pistols.

HJN

[This message has been edited by Harley Nolden (edited December 30, 1999).]

[This message has been edited by Harley Nolden (edited December 30, 1999).]

James K
December 31, 1999, 04:38 PM
Hi, guys,

First off, they are not duelling pistols, they are a pair of carrying pistols, very common in England at the time. My sources show a Calvert (no first name available) active in Leeds around 1807 and the same or another Calvert in London about 1811. There was a J.W. Calvert in Leeds after about 1842, but he made percussion revolvers and these pistols would have been obsolete by then. He may have been the same man or a son or other relative of him.

The markings do not indicate the owner(s), but the maker and the town where he worked. Leeds is a city in what was the West Riding of Yorkshire.

The pistols were probably of reasonably good quality and about average for the period; brass barrels were cheaper than iron and very common. They are of a size that would fit into a gentleman's greatcoat pockets.

Duelling pistols are always of very high quality. They have fairly long barrels, and never have any brightwork or brass that could shine in the eyes of the user. A dueller of that time would have had a beautiful octagon Damascus barrel, superb wood, probably engraving in the best taste, nice checkering, screw slots perfectly aligned, etc.

Jim

Senator
January 10, 2000, 05:35 PM
Wow, Jim! Thanks for the great info. I'd completely forgotten about this thread. Sorry it took me so long to respond. Do you have any idea where I might obtain a value for these pistols?

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Kelly

SenatorsPlace.com (http://www.SenatorsPlace.com)

Deo Vindice

James K
January 11, 2000, 05:35 PM
I can't find any book that gives a price for even that type of pistol. My guess would be $350-400 each, but anyone with a better idea of the value please respond.

Jim

[This message has been edited by Jim Keenan (edited January 11, 2000).]