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9-ball
June 5, 2011, 02:23 PM
Hello,

As there were some firing stance related posts the past days, that got me thinking about which stances are the most used. Could you fill in the shooting stance you use the most? I hope this hasn't been polled before, couldn't find anything with the search...

Shane Tuttle
June 5, 2011, 02:42 PM
It's been brought up fairly often in the past, but not so much lately.

My own personal preference is the Modified Weaver or "chapman". Throwing in the mix is I'm ambidextrous shooting right handed yet left eye dominant. Overall, I like using it half the time and practice the rest the other half. I'd sure hate to be used to only one style only to be shot and not be able to readily adapt.

ClayInTx
June 5, 2011, 02:52 PM
Target shooting, or practicing for self defense?

The choices you list seem to be only for target competition.

9-ball
June 5, 2011, 02:56 PM
I'm also cross dominant. Do you cant your head too and let your cheek rest on your arm to get your left eye in front of your sights?

Shane Tuttle
June 5, 2011, 03:07 PM
Bingo!
Funny thing is, when I switch to using my left hand, I shoot better for a while. Mainly due to the fact I'm not trying too hard and my brain is in a sense relearning the process out of habit.

BlackFeather
June 5, 2011, 03:09 PM
Usually, in a modified martial arts stance. I honestly never fell in with a lot of the stances. Weaver is fine, as it's similar to what I use but it's really all me. If I had the chance to practice more, I may try other stances more often but unfortunately I can't.

spacecoast
June 5, 2011, 03:56 PM
Since most of my shooting is done in Bullseye matches, I answered "one handed". It also makes all the two-handed shooting seem really easy.

threegun
June 5, 2011, 05:28 PM
My stance depends on my position in the reactionary curve. If I'm ahead I can stand a deliver aimed fire. For this I use a stance similar to the weaver but more comfortable for me. If I'm even or behind in the reactionary curve I'm gonna be shooting while on the move so stance is out of the question.

Reactionary curve is simply were the firearm of the bad guy is compared to my firearm. If I'm ahead it means my gun is up and out and the bad guys is holstered or reaching. Even in the curve is as it suggests the bad guy and I are both raising guns. Behind is also self explanatory.

a7mmnut
June 5, 2011, 06:07 PM
Modified Weaver all the time. You can't shoot a hunting pistol standing flat footed and squared off--unless you want to sit down rather quickly. I can't stand to see instructors insisting on one type of stance to fit today's "pop" influences. Revover shooting is completely forgotten.

-7-

MLeake
June 5, 2011, 11:32 PM
a7mmNut, do you include 10mm long slides and .44 magnum revolvers in the "hunting pistols" category?

If so, you can certainly shoot them from isosceles position. But you should do so from a partial crouch. Bent knees allow body weight forward posture. Deeper the knee bend, the more weight can lean forward to soak up recoil.

Flat-footed with knees locked isn't my preferred way to stand, let alone fight or shoot.

KenpoTex
June 6, 2011, 06:39 AM
When I hear "stance," I think "foot position"...which I think is pretty irrelevant. I typically shoot from a Modern-Iso position as far as my upper-body is concerned. My feet are wherever they happen to be at the time. As long as you're in a "stance" that allows for movement and management of recoil/impact without interfering the other aspects of your shooting, I don't see why it really matters.

And, FWIW, I use the same position for everything from a .22 to a S&W .460 without ever having been knocked on my butt...

JimPage
June 6, 2011, 07:17 AM
Shane Tuttle and other cross dominants:

Good rifle instructors know that a left eye dominant shooter shoots better left handed than right handed despite being right handed and how he/she feels uncomfortable initially. I have seen many times where shooting has significantly improved by doing this.

Although I don't have direct experience, I strongly suspect that the same is the case for pistol shooters.

9-ball
June 6, 2011, 01:28 PM
JimPage,

I agree with you on rifle shooting, I do shoot left-handed. But with a handgun you can use your left eye while still using your most stable hand, seems like a better deal to me. I have frequently shot left handed and my results are far worse then right handed with left eye.

Shooting a rifle right handed (with right eye ofc) at short distances doesn't affect to much, but with a scope the non-dominant eye can produce some parallax, so I generally shoot left-handed.

Buzzcook
June 6, 2011, 01:32 PM
I switch between one hand and a bastard weaver.

Shooting one hand is more physically comfortable. It's the way I learned to shoot.
I say bastard Weaver because it's mostly self taught with some pointers from other shooters.

Deaf Smith
June 6, 2011, 07:02 PM
Egret.

As popularised by Brian Enos.

Deaf

orionengnr
June 6, 2011, 07:49 PM
Modified Weaver.

raimius
June 6, 2011, 08:14 PM
I usually use the "ISO," as described by Stanford.
Sometimes I will fall back into a Chapman.

Shane Tuttle
June 7, 2011, 10:35 AM
Shane Tuttle and other cross dominants:

Good rifle instructors know that a left eye dominant shooter shoots better left handed than right handed despite being right handed and how he/she feels uncomfortable initially. I have seen many times where shooting has significantly improved by doing this.

Although I don't have direct experience, I strongly suspect that the same is the case for pistol shooters.

As it may be the case normally, I'm always shooting with different stances to be proficient. I don't expect to be in the stance of my choice if the unthinkable happens. To clarify my point I'll tell you what my instructors have always said. And this isn't intended to be sexist:

Instructors I've come across almost always prefer to teach females or novices. Men in general already think they know it yet have bad habits ingrained. It takes time to hit the reset button and "relearn" a new technique. The left side of my brain shooting right-handed can fall into this habit to a certain degree. I already know what to do. Yet when trying to further fine tune my shooting, I kinda feel that side is resisting small changes.

Switching to shooting left handed, it's all "new" to my right side. Following the fundamentals of marksmanship, it's easy to train and perform well in the beginning. The "beginning" is a key term here...

scottycoyote
June 7, 2011, 11:34 AM
i shot weaver for years but im trying to retrain myself with my ccw to shoot iso now.

aarondhgraham
June 7, 2011, 12:11 PM
If it was good enough for James Bond,,,
http://thefiringline.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=70995&stc=1&d=1307466502 http://thefiringline.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=70994&stc=1&d=1307466502
It's good enough for me,,,

The difficult part was learning to hold my left arm at the perfect rakish angle,,,
After that all I needed was a Walther style pistol,,,
Bersa Thunder 380 filled that need.

The Dalton Variant is much more elegant than the Moore Variant,,,
Don't you agree?

Aarond

markj
June 7, 2011, 02:39 PM
I too wear a tux often and use that stance while picking up chicks...

I usually am firing from the floor after I tripped and fell using one of them stances..... Now I concentrate on drawing, getting on target and shooting as fast as possible, ends up knees slightly bent weight forward gun up and shooting before off hand can get to it first shot.

I find getting it out fgetting on target and the first shot off to be important so it is what Ifocus on.

MLeake
June 7, 2011, 04:01 PM
Dalton vs Moore...

Based on various Bond movies, plus "Flash Gordon," it's pretty obvious that Dalton received a fair amount of training in theatrical martial arts, at least. Not sure if he has any more serious training background, but the man knows how to move convincingly.

So I guess it's not a surprise his poses look more poised than Moore's.

Jim March
June 7, 2011, 04:16 PM
Although I don't have direct experience, I strongly suspect that the same is the case for pistol shooters.

You'd be wrong :).

There's a Weaver variant that only a cross-dominant can pull off - and while shooting strong-side hand.

We can straighten our strongside arm, rest our strongside cheek against strongside bicep and line our strong "cross" eye up with the sights.

This is the most stable handgun position possible while standing on your feet!

It's no good for close combat as your peripheral vision is compromised. So for that, we can lean the gun about 15deg left and do a "double bent arm" Weaver with the sights aligned with the offside strong eye.

We can shift back and forth between the "cheek weld Weaver" and a more normal Weaver/Chapman variant at will, and very quickly.

AK103K
June 7, 2011, 04:21 PM
What youre describing there Jim is the old Paris Theodore "Quell" system.

With a little practice, it works well, even if youre not cross dominant. Once you get it down, it is fast and accurate. It was meant to deliver a fast, precise shot to a specific point in the facial area.

Mudinyeri
June 7, 2011, 04:22 PM
I'll see your James Bond and raise you ... :D

http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w187/sirkt/Rules%20of%20a%20gunfight/rule4.jpg?t=1277695726

Stevie-Ray
June 7, 2011, 04:28 PM
We can straighten our strongside arm, rest our strongside cheek against strongside bicep and line our strong "cross" eye up with the sights.Pretty much my favorite, though I practice others as well.

Found it naturally, by default, many years ago.

silverbullet
July 12, 2011, 03:48 PM
If hitting the target is really important to you:
Im shooting a large frame S&W target model in .44 mag.
This may be the first place you will see this because Ive never seen it before.
I also shoot a .45 SAA 4.5 Sheriff's model and the difference in the weight is substantial.
Figured there must be a way to support the .44 mag so it could do what it was designed to do.
Bear with me now.
As a right hand shooter, take your pistol hand and place it on a horizontally held left upper arm. Bring your left hand up and grab your right upper arm. Your gun hand (NOT YOUR PISTOL)should be resting on your left upper arm.
It took me about three months of working through all types of non conventional holding stances to finally determine this was just totally the best by far of any commonly taught stances!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Now, the first time out, it was a bit chilly and I had on a cotton shirt with flannel lining. After a couple of shots, and hey, I was mighty proud of myself with the new found accuracy, I noticed that my shirt WAS ON FIRE...lol.
But I was undaunted because of the bulls eye holes in the target at 50 yards.
I bought an arm guard, its leather and has elastic top and bottom, like a tube that slips onto your arm. I think it is a welder's thing.
Try this stance, ONLY WITH LONG BARREL HANDGUNS or you may shoot a hole in your arm.
disclaimer: anyone stupid enough to try this with a short barrel or without dry firing numerous times to (1) lock in the necessary safety aspects and (2) practice safe firearm practices who becomes injured using this stance is on your own. I am not liable for any resulting injuries.
Its like Robert D. Raford says, "You cant pass enough laws to protect the stupid people and its God's way of weeding them out anyhow."
__________________

Old Grump
July 13, 2011, 01:29 PM
This may be the first place you will see this because Ive never seen it before.Hard to find something new. I set an army field jacket on fire in 1973 shooting a friends brand new 44 magnum like that. He had bought it and a Marlin 44 mag for bear hunting. I found I did better one handed and it was easier on my clothes. Today I don't think I could hold it up in the air one handed. I learned to bring the hand of the support arm higher up on the bicep of my shooting arm if I'm wearing col weather clothes or rest it on my shoulder if in light shirt or T shirt. That got the front of the cylinder forward of my elbow. Awkward but it works.