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461
September 8, 1999, 09:33 PM
A friend at work asked me about a shotgun today and I can't come up with anything so I thought I'd turn you guys loose on it.

Seems this is a semi-auto Remington 410 from around the fifties or early sixties. The curious thing is that the barrel actually recoils back and forth like an artillery piece. I don't have any markings or serial # range yet but he said he'd bring it in for me to examine. Any thoughts? I'm not a shotgunner at all, so I don't have much on them in my library.


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TJS

Harley Nolden
September 8, 1999, 10:14 PM
Tim:
It sounds like a Remington Mod. 11, but that's only a guess. Once you have the shotgun, present a description and I will try my best to identify it for you.

HJN

461
September 8, 1999, 10:29 PM
Thank you sir, I'll keep you posted.

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TJS

Jeff OTMG
September 9, 1999, 03:16 AM
The Remington semi-auto shotguns that I am aware of that came in .410 were special editions of the model 1100, but the earliest that these 1100's were produced was 1969 and some were not introduced until the mid-80's. So that leaves the other possibility as the 11-48, and given the years you mention it is probably that model. I did not think Rem. ever made mod 11, 48, or 58's available in .410.

Harley Nolden
September 9, 1999, 07:22 AM
Jeff:
I have to agree with you on that point, however, the recoiling bbl. throws me on that one. I have a tendency to believe it may be a 16ga.

HJN

Jeff OTMG
September 9, 1999, 02:49 PM
That recoiling barrel gets me too. Why would any .410 have a recoiling barrel?

James K
September 9, 1999, 04:45 PM
Jeff and others,

All the old Browning type semi-auto shotguns use a long recoil action. Many shooters never realize that the barrel moves, but it actually recoils all the way back before it is released and allowed to run forward, followed by the bolt.

You can demonstrate this by loading one with DUMMY shells, then putting the butt on the ground and pushing downward on the barrel. You won't be able to see this action when using the bolt handle.

The Remington Model 11 was nearly identical to the Browning A5; it was never made in .410. The Model 11-48 was a streamlined variation and it was made in .410.

Jim

Harley Nolden
September 9, 1999, 06:45 PM
Jim:
Did the 11-48 have the long recoil system also?

HJN

461
September 10, 1999, 07:39 AM
Hi All,
I still have not seen the weapon, possibly this weekend. After further discussion, my friend thinks it said model 11-58 on it. Sounded pretty close to 11-48 to me, but he seems quite sure it says 11-58. we'll have to see. He assumed that the 11-58 meant that it was a model 11 from 1958 which is why he thinks it's a late fifties early sixties weapon. I promise to keep you informed. Thanks again for all the input.

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TJS

Paul B.
September 10, 1999, 01:10 PM
Looking in an old Stoegers catalog I have (1959, and all beat to hell) shows the Remington 11-48 in 410. If memory serves, the 11-48 was the same as the original Remington model 11 with a streamlined receiver. I would imagine, that if the 11-48 is a streamlined version of the model 11, it would have the recoiling barrel system as found in the model 11 and Browning A-5's
Paul B.

Jason Demond
September 12, 1999, 02:48 PM
The model 11 was made between 1911 to 1949

There were 300,000 made in different configurations.

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James K
September 12, 1999, 04:42 PM
Hi Harley,

Yes, the 11-48 was a long recoil gun. Remington merely reshaped some of the Model 11 parts to allow a streamlined looking receiver rather than the Model 11 "humpback" look (same as the Browning Auto 5). The 11-48 had the same type of friction ring adjustment for shell power as the Model 11.

The Remington 58 was a gas operated action. It was made in 12, 16, and 20 gauge. I don't think it was ever called the "11-58" as it was not descended from the Model 11. The 58 had a manual gas adjustment at the front of the magazine tube that allowed release of more gas when high power loads were to be used. It was made from 1956 to 1963.

There was also a gas operated auto called the 878, made in 12 gauge only from 1959 to 1962. It used some of the same type of gas system as the later, and very successful, 1100.

Jim

Harley Nolden
September 12, 1999, 07:00 PM
Jim:
Thanks for for the info. I happen to have a Rem 58 and am familiar with that action. Did they not call the Remm ll The Widow Maker some years back?

HJN

461
September 13, 1999, 08:41 PM
OK, I've got the skinny on this thing now. Turns out that it is indeed an 11-48 Serial #is 41217xx Chambered for 3" 410 shells. Anybody care to take a guess as to value? Condition is really very good, probably an 85 out of 100%.

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TJS

Jeff OTMG
September 14, 1999, 12:50 AM
Usually there is a letter associated with Remington serial numbers. Retail value would not be more than $300 and that would be with a vent rib barrel and the bonus value for the .410. Somewhere in the $200-$265 with the plain barrel, $150-$200 wholesale.

Are there bonus points for me figuring out the right model? :)

[This message has been edited by Jeff OTMG (edited September 14, 1999).]

Harley Nolden
September 14, 1999, 07:26 AM
TIM
Glad we got this straightned out. There were approx 425,000 of these made between 1949-1968. Value in exc. condition $300.00

HJN

461
September 14, 1999, 07:35 AM
Jeff OTMG,
50 Bonus Points. Good for absolutely nothing, but they're all yours. :)

All others,
Thank you very much for all the input and assistance.

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TJS