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anthony6727
May 23, 2011, 11:35 PM
I've been reading a thread debating the pros and cons of a manual safety or not and since I hopefully will purchase my first Handgun soon its got me to thinking.

Just a little personal background, I grew up in a household that was fairly anti-gun. Despite all that, I grew up with an awe of firearms and a strong desire to learn to shoot. Recently, I was able to get my wife interested in shooting. This has lead us to investigate different types of handguns, etc.

Which brings me back to the issue discussed in the safety vs no-safety thread. I personally would prefer not to have it because I don't feel confident that my wife will train enough to get the "instinct" to turn it off.

Besides my wifes potential lack of training, I also worry about kids. Some day I want to have kids and having grown up in an environment where guns where not present, I worry about how I am going to keep my gun away from curious hands, and also keep it accessible in the case something goes bump in the night.


However, if I put a lock on my gun, or put it in a safe or something else, isn't that just giving me something else to fumble with in case something happens?

So my question is, for those who have had children, or have grown up in a house with guns, how did you / your parents store your HD handgun? How do you keep it safe from kids yet accessible?

LockedBreech
May 24, 2011, 01:02 AM
When I was too young to understand guns, they were kept out of reach. When I was old enough to be sat down and explained to about guns, and taken shooting (about 5-6) the mystery was gone and I was taught the utter seriousness of them. After that, they were no longer locked up. I did what my parents said and never messed with them. They only got touched when we went shooting.

Really put the fear of god in your kids in that first sit-down. Explain to them that they can kill somebody they love, and don't be gentle about it. I only had to be told once (and I only had to be yelled to tears once for sweeping my barrel away from downrange at age 9).

That was my bringing-up, anyway. These days I prefer no safety.

Crazy88Fingers
May 24, 2011, 01:04 AM
They make small gun safes that read your fingerprints to unlock. You can stash a gun (maybe two) in there, place it wherever you like, and your gun(s) will be only moments away. No keys or combinations to mess around with; just place your fingers in the appropriate place, and you're ready to go.

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/default.aspx?productNumber=246722

If you have children in the home, having an easily accessible gun is more likely to be a problem than a convenience. Also, some states require by law that guns be kept safely away from minors in the home.

Single Six
May 24, 2011, 04:28 AM
To keep my kids safe, I keep the ammo locked up in a separate container from the guns, which are also locked up. The only loaded weapon in the house is in a small bedside safe, which is equipped with a keypad. In practice, I've been able to access it in 5 seconds. To hedge my bets, I also did this: Both of my boys were taken out by me to our back yard. I set up a gallon jug filled with water and shot it once. The gun used was a .44 Magnum with 240 grain HPs. The loud blast, the detonation of the water jug, and the remains of same all combined to drive it home for the kids: "This is what a gun can do. This is why you don't play with them." In a clear and dramatic fashion, the point had been made. Afterward, I sat down with the boys and had them help me go through the process of cleaning the gun. This went a long way towards taking away a lot of the glamor and mystique so many kids have toward firearms. Lastly, they were both told this: "Anytime you want to look at one of my guns, just come ask me." This, I feel, worked far better than the standard "Don't you ever touch that", which most kids take as a challenge rather than a warning. This method, as I've described it, has worked for me and my family.

catnphx
May 24, 2011, 08:30 AM
I keep my loaded guns in this. I don't like keys or batteries but this mechanical lock is great. It's very accessible.

V-Line Top Draw Storage (http://www.vlineind.com/html/top_draw.html)

http://www.vlineind.com/assets/images/DSC_0031.jpg

- Five button mechanical lock for quick access with 1081 possible combinations.
- Top opening security case with classic slim design.
- 3/8" thick steel lock block welded to cover guides and adds strength to the lock bolt.
- Prepunched holes for easy installation.
- Lock bolts directly through the inner frame of case to prevent prying.
- Foam lining on top and bottom protects and holds contents securely in place.
- Sturdy fabricated steel construction with pry resistant clamshell design.
- Continuous hinge is welded on one end to prevent pin removal.
- Model 2912-S can be mounted directly to any surface or attached with the optional Mounting Bracket for easy portability.

Spats McGee
May 24, 2011, 09:20 AM
One of the mods on this site, Pax, has a site that's worth looking into: http://www.corneredcat.com/

There's a very good section on Kids and Guns.

pgdion
May 24, 2011, 10:00 AM
I have guns and kids, no problem.
All of my guns except 1 stay unloaded and locked in my gun storage cabinet. The rifles have trigger locks on them, the pistols are locked in the case. I have a night stand security box for the gun I keep for defense. That one is the one that stays loaded and ready. Lots of good security boxes for pistols out there, the type of lock is personal preference. Mine has a 10 digit key pad with large easy to hit keys. My code is something I easily remember. Practice hitting the code often (just practice keying it in and opening the safe regularly) so it gets to be a habit. (btw - replace batteries regularly). For the reasons you mentioned, my gun is a DA/SA (DA mode, safety off). DAO would work ok for this scenario too.

The other thing is teach your kids about guns early. My kids are very familiar with them. I take them to the range with me and they all know how to shoot and get to fairly regularly. This way guns are not such a novelty and don't draw the attention they would if they were never exposed to them.

TailGator
May 24, 2011, 10:26 AM
My kids are now 22 and 24, so I made it. My defensive gun was always kept in some type of quick-access gun box. I still have one that I use when we have any guests in the house. It is a GunVault Microvault, which I find to be versatile, because the included cable allows me to use it in the car and in hotel rooms as well as at home. Guns that did not need to be accessed quickly were and are kept under lock and key. A true gun safe is necessary for theft protection, but there are many range bags and pistol rugs that can be locked with a small padlock to protect against unauthorized handling.

As a side note, your introductory comment about pistol safeties concern me a bit. You do understand, I hope, that a thumb safety is not adequate protection for children. A kid can disengage a thumb safety just by fiddling around and not even know what they did. Your followup question makes me think that you understand that, but I wanted to be explicit since the stakes are high.

bitttorrrent
May 24, 2011, 10:42 AM
Several points here.

I grew up with loaded guns in the house, knew where they were and how to get to them. Not toddler mind you, but preteen. Never a problem cause we were good kids. That was the 70's - station wagons with no seat belts etc. - DO NOT DO THIS IN THIS DAY AND AGE.

I now have toddlers and keep a lock box with sd gun empty with loaded mag next to it all in same box. Other guns are separate from any ammo(all locked) and have cable locks on them. So a toddler could not "Find a gun" and make it go off.

Very important though is not your house - it is your neighbors and the loaded semi-auto under the bed that your or his kid finds.
KNOW WHERE YOUR KID IS PLAYING.

A while back a secretary of mine had her son almost blew his head off cause they found a loaded gun under bed next door and it went off and grazed his head. he was eventually ok after hospital, but this does happen for the worse.

EVERYBODY who has potential for kids to be in their home should have the weapons secured from small hands - and that does not mean hidden under a bed. That is practically eye level for the little tykes.

sd weapons are to protect them, not hurt them. And a safety is not enough. I have on my sd gun as added measure as well as sa/da.

doofus47
May 24, 2011, 10:43 AM
1. Remove the danger: lock em up. My neighbor uses a finger-scanner security box that is keyed to his and maybe his wife's fingers as well. The kids don't have to know that they are there.

2. Demystify guns. if you're kids are old enough to understand, then you can tell them about the guns. When I"m cleaning my pistols/rifles, my daughter has questions and I answer them the same way I would any other question. I let her handle pieces like the barrel or magazine; I tell her the names of the parts and explain the mechanics. She doesn't get the mechanics so well.

3. Equate responsibility with using handguns/rifles. These are not toys and people can get very hurt by accident. "Once that bullet leaves the barrel, there's no calling it back." The first thing I did with my dad and his .22 rifle was break it down and clean it. Several times. Eventually, we got to shooting. This is a personal belief of mine, but if kids associate guns with chores and responsibilities, it's harder for them to see them as toys.

4. At what point do you tell the children that you have pistols in the house for self-defense? That's a question best answered by you and your wife. My grandma used to let hobos sleep in the barn during the Great Depression, but "she always kept a brace of pistols handy" according to my aunts and uncles. All of the 8 kids in her family knew about the pistols; none would have thought of taking them out for a joy ride.

anthony6727
May 24, 2011, 12:39 PM
@Tailorgator

Thanks for your comment. Yes, i'm well aware that safeties are by no means a good measure to keep your kids safe from guns. It's just as i was considering the issue of having a safety vs. no safety I realized that while I personally would rather not having one, when I started thinking about kids, my lack of personal experience growing up has led me to want to have as many safeguards as possible to make me sleep better at night when I do have kids of my own.

I'm slowly learning that my personal fears (I hesitate to say "gun fears" becasue I personally do not fear guns, I just fear what uneducated, and untrained hands can do), just need to be addressed with the good advice of this thread.


I'm thinking a good gun safe, and a quick access nightstand safe for a loaded gun is the direction i'm heading.

I am a prime example of how the foundation of unecessary hesitation/concerns can be overcome with some good instruction and education. :D

anthony6727
May 24, 2011, 12:40 PM
as a second note, I really believe that educating my kids is going to be the key when they are ready. I have been reading some articles from this website:

http://www.corneredcat.com/Kids/kidstorage.aspx


and it really has made alot of valid points.

Spats McGee
May 24, 2011, 01:20 PM
Lots of good advice here. Locks and safes and separating the ammo from the gun . . . that will protect kids at your home. Education is what will protect them everywhere else. Someone on this board made a very good analogy about this one time. I forget who said it, but it's not mine, so I can't claim credit. Teaching your kids about guns is a lot like teaching them to swim. The deep water in the world won't go away just because you didn't teach your kids to swim.

440SAW
May 24, 2011, 02:09 PM
Everything said is so good; esp that you have to train/expose the family: wife, kids anyone in the house.
A gun with the clip someplace else that is convenient to you is pretty safe: unless the clip is accessible to the kids.
Keep them where you can get to them in the time it takes to get from your door to your point of vulnerability in the home.

Mello2u
May 24, 2011, 02:36 PM
http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb197/farwalker/gunlocker2copy.jpg
This push button combination lock-box is a good place to secure your handguns from children when you do not have the handgun on your person.

No batteries to go dead when you most need to open the box (Murphy's Law).

It can be opened in the dark in a few seconds.

markj
May 24, 2011, 02:59 PM
In many states a gun left unlocked and used in a crime may come back and bite you hard. Secure them to protect yourself from this.

AirborneMosinFan
May 24, 2011, 05:03 PM
When I grew up my mom wouldn't even let me have a toy gun let alone a real fire arm, even squirt guns! When I got my hands on my first pistol at 17 from a friend I knew little about muzzle awareness and puting the safe on. The guidelines for using a fire arm should always be taught whether or not they have them growing up.

BGutzman
May 24, 2011, 05:22 PM
Not all push button boxes are well built or child safe... Do some research and hands on if you can prior to buying.

For myself I grew up with unloaded firearms in every corner of the house and we began shooting very young... Unfortunately the days for that seem to have past as the slighest parental trust is now a legal liability..

FAS1
May 24, 2011, 06:49 PM
My requirements for me when I decided to build a handgun safe are:

1) must be secure and prevent unauthorized access.
2) must not require a key, because keys can be lost or duplicated, and they slow access.
3) must not require batteries, because batteries can lose their charge when you need them the most.
4) must be able to be unlocked in the dark by touch only, within a few seconds.
5) must have versatile mounting options.

These requirements eliminated all except one type of locking mechanism – the Simplex lock. Then we proceeded to build a much heavier box than was available on the market. Most boxes will keep your kids out, but I wanted something to deter a thief a little more than a 16 gauge steel box. Ours is 3/16" (7 gauge) with many other features built in. In addition, we then added a strut to open the door and present the gun to you in the same place and orientation every time so you don't fumble for it in the dark.

Your requirement might be different and another product work better for your needs. There are lots of choices out there.

http://fas1safe.com/images/FAS1%20Mount%20Options%20004.jpg

catnphx
May 24, 2011, 07:37 PM
FAS1 - I've looked at that and I do like this but I just continue to have a hard time with the price ... $189 is a little much in my opinion. Otherwise, I do like the looks and functionality of the product.

Just thought I'd mention.

irish52084
May 25, 2011, 12:56 AM
This has been well covered, but I'll toss in my 2 cents. I have 2 sons, ages 6 and 1. I use a gunvault for my home defense pistol and keep my other guns unloaded if not in a safe. Luckily for our children both parents grew up in homes with guns and were trained in their safe use.

As soon as our oldest began to show a real interest in shooting, hunting, fishing we decided he was ready to be taught about firearms. He was about 5 maybe just a bit younger when this happened, each child is different and you just have to feel them out to decide when is the right time. I don't make guns a mystery and if he wants to see one or handle one all he has to do is ask and he has a few times, usually when a new one arrives.

I've just started him on my really old daisy air rifle and when he shows us he can be safe and responsible with it, he can move on to my bolt action .22. When he's safe and responsible with the .22 I think I'll give it to him or buy him one of his own. As he matures and progresses, so will the firearms he can have access to. I can't wait till he is a little bigger and a little more mature so he can start hunting with us. His uncles, and grandfathers will be thrilled at the chance to get him into the field, he's got some seriously good hunters to learn from and if he enjoys it, he'll be a good hunter himself.

I think these kinds of things are great to help kids gain responsibility, maturity and confidence. I truly think it's sad how many kids never get a chance to do some of the things I did as a kid. It seems like as a society we try too hard to keep them protected from anything that challenges them. How can they grow without an occasional challenge or learn if they are never given the chance to make mistakes?

pgdion
May 25, 2011, 09:50 AM
My brothers family has gun phobia. I think it's mostly driven from his wife as he used to shoot a little. The kids are not allowed to have any guns of any type, no cap guns, no squirt guns, ect. Everything his son picks up is a 'gun', be it a stick or whatever. The fascination is extreme simply because it is such an unknown experience. I fear what would happen if a kid like that came across a real gun ... you know he would play with it and I'm sure fire it and he would have no idea of if it's loaded or not or what would really happen when you pull the trigger. By sheltering him he's in far greater danger than my kids who have been around guns there whole life.

FAS1
May 25, 2011, 10:27 AM
catnphx

FAS1 - I've looked at that and I do like this but I just continue to have a hard time with the price ... $189 is a little much in my opinion. Otherwise, I do like the looks and functionality of the product.

Just thought I'd mention.

Well, it will never be sold in Walmart :D

It's really not for everyone. The people who want a significantly heavier product than anything else on the market that is built with American made components and labor don't have any problem realizing the value in it. Steel is going up in price as well as all the components so we will have to actually go up a little on our price next month. If you are satisfied with the security offered from light gauge metal as many are then something else might be better for you. Just as all our customers won't consider buying something that requires electricity or batteries.

Dre_sa
May 25, 2011, 11:25 AM
Back before my divorce, my wife (now ex) had a child of 4 years.

I bought a pistol for home defense, to make sure I could adequately respond to the worst of threats.

To keep little hand off things the weapon, I bought a small pistol safe, and mounted it to my nightstand. during waking hours, the pistol was locked away in the safe, with a full magazine, but empty chamber. The key to this small safe was either on my person or hanging from a hook about 8 feet up and 3 yards from the safe. After the child was asleep, I would put the key in the lock. After retiring for the night, the safe would be open with my pistol inside.

If it was not in the safe, which was rarely, and only if there was a marked increase in police activity in the neighborhood (multiple sirens around or circling police helicopter), the pistol was on my person, but only inside my home.

The only way to keep little hands off the pistol is to know where it is at all times, this means on your person, or in a locked safe with strictly limited access.

I kept the pistol in the condition it was in for one very important reason. A child would not be able to retract the slide far enough to chamber a round, assuming they indeed figured out that the slide had to be retracted. My ex-wife couldn't even retract the slide, so a 4 year old is unlikely to be able to. Additionally, should the pistol be needed in a hurry, it only takes half a second to chamber a round and present. Indeed this could all be done in the same motion.

Putting a lock on the pistol I think is a major hindrance to getting it all ready when needed. One needs to unlock the lock which can be a task and a half, especially under stress, then one needs to load the weapon and make it ready. A small safe I believe is Ideal, as the pistol can be stored in a ready or near ready state, but still stored safely.

I feel pistol selection is extremely important here. A revolver requires only that the cylinder be locked into position and the trigger pulled. A semi-auto requires the slide to be pulled back, a far harder task for little hands. Safety's are moot here, as they are easy to disengage

armsmaster270
May 25, 2011, 08:57 PM
When I was born my father was a Motorcycle officer. When he got home he would hang his leather jacket with gunbelt and S&W M&P loaded, on the jacket in the hall closet. His off duty weapon a Colt Det. Spl. was in his top right dresser drawer. Both my older brother and I knew we weren't to touch them without permission. Any time I asked my father would allow me to handle his pistols, he would unload it then give it to me and I had to check it too. This manner of storage is not condoned now but those were simpler days. When I had small children I( familiarized my kids as soon as I could and had the same success my dad did. Taught them to shoot both pistols and rifles at 6 years age just as my dad did to me.
Now my kids are gone on their own and raising their own kids and I have a gun Safe for all but my carry guns. Not for the kids but to slow down burglars.

http://i239.photobucket.com/albums/ff207/armsmaster270/Guns/SafeHandguns.jpg
http://i239.photobucket.com/albums/ff207/armsmaster270/Guns/Safelongarms.jpg

BfloBill
May 26, 2011, 05:00 AM
I believe in teaching kids about guns to eliminate the dangrous combination of curiosity and ignorance. I taught my kids in stages:

1) Don't ever touch a gun and if you see one go get an adult. (I remember my Dad testing my kids when they were 3-5 yrs old by removing the bolt on a rifle and leaving it on the bed in the spare room to see if they would come tell us without touching it-they passed with flying colors)

2) When they start showing interest let them sit with you while cleaning firearms. They will ask questions, you can point out the parts and explain their functions, and in this environment it is easy to slip in the safety rules so they don't even realize they are getting lectured.

3) Go HEAVY on the safety rules in a more formal manner. The reward for paying attention was getting to shoot. At this point they are handling guns and shooting them with supervision. (And not just any schmuck who is an adult-be picky- mine could only shoot with my Dad, my Brother or Me)

4) Then at some point you deem them capable of going it alone because you know they are safe with firearms. (None of mine are at this stage yet)

As far as the handgun safety with toddlers the solution was simple: If it was not in the safe, it was on my hip. In my mind that is the only way to be sure to prevent a problem with toddlers around.

40caljustice
May 26, 2011, 06:04 AM
My son is 2 years old and I have 3 pistols that are in our home. Its just he and I so I have to be on my toes and play it safe. I haven't got someone who can check behind me or fix a mistake I made like leaving my gun too low where he can climb and reach it. When I walk in my home I get him settled and put my edc g27 on a shelf next to my front door about 5 foot off the floor. Plenty far enough out his reach. My g23 normally stays close at hand thru the house. On the counter when cooking or arm rest when reclining etc.. I always know and keep my gun my first thought on my mind. Its a habit. When he gets up from playing toys I watch and keep gun safety my first thought. Its almost obsessive. At night my XDm is under my pillow. If I'm awakened it's my first thought. I'm sure I'll have to change my habits as he gets older and I will do it happily if it keeps my family safe.

He hasn't shown much interest yet. He is still young but when he does I want him to be as aware of firearms as I am. We recently had an incident where someone tried prying our basement door open while we were sleeping. We heard the ding of our door open alert system (not quite an alarm system but very effective nonetheless. I would recommend everyone have it on each door leading outside.). I grabbed my pillow pistol and cell because I immediately knew something was wrong. I went to his room and locked the door. I opened the window and yelled out that I was armed and had the police on the phone. I heard the perp jump the neighbors fence and I called the police.

Would 5-10 extra seconds changed the outcome of the situation? Probably not but maybe. Who knows. I apologize for getting a bit off topic but a real situation from a fella without a night safe. Heck I may be dumb for alot of reasons I don't see. It works for now. Just remember to keep gun safety 1st and always think the worst. Anything can happen with or without a safe. Kids are the darnedest things. Just my opinion.

irish52084
May 26, 2011, 11:08 AM
We had a situation a little while back that really got my better half to realize that a gun you have to load or get out of the safe is not always the best idea. She had unloaded my nightstand gun when I was out because she didn't want to deal with securing it from our 2 kids. Only problem is, she didn't tell me. About 2:30 in the morning our dog starts barking in a very serious tone and then we hear someone trying to open one of our back doors. I get up grab the pistol, chamber check and, surprise, it's empty. I had to load the mag, 18 rounds, before checking it out.

I broke it down to her that an unloaded gun is basically useless if you need it right away. She agreed and we moved on. Keep in mind, this is not a woman afraid of guns or the idea of having to use one. She's gone out and check the garage or backyard with her own pistol before when I'm at work.

I think our dog was enough of a deterrent to whoever was trying to break in. He's a big, intimidating dog and I know I feel better with him around since I work nights.

pgdion
May 26, 2011, 11:45 AM
Agreed Irish, dogs are the best. Mine is our #1 line of defense. He's a big sweet heart but doesn't like strangers, has a loud menacing bark when he's nervous, and dogs hear everything! He buys me the time to get the gun from the lock box.

insolentshrew
May 26, 2011, 12:17 PM
2. Demystify guns. if you're kids are old enough to understand, then you can tell them about the guns. When I"m cleaning my pistols/rifles, my daughter has questions and I answer them the same way I would any other question. I let her handle pieces like the barrel or magazine; I tell her the names of the parts and explain the mechanics. She doesn't get the mechanics so well.

3. Equate responsibility with using handguns/rifles. These are not toys and people can get very hurt by accident. "Once that bullet leaves the barrel, there's no calling it back." The first thing I did with my dad and his .22 rifle was break it down and clean it. Several times. Eventually, we got to shooting. This is a personal belief of mine, but if kids associate guns with chores and responsibilities, it's harder for them to see them as toys.

I was going to mention #2. A great thing is as others have said, give the children when they are old enough, the option to handle the guns whenever they want if they ask you. If you make it safe, and each time they handle it, go over safety rules, it helps remove the "want" of playing with them if they can do it with just a word. They will be less likely to seek it out on their own and hurt themselves.

I had never thought about the cleaning option, but that is a great idea. Right now my fiance's toddler wants to do whatever I do, so I don't do anything around him that he shouldnt be doing - because I know he is going to try and do it as well, because he saw me do it. So he doesn't so much as even get to see firearms yet, but when he gets older and hates doing chores, you better believe I am going to start making him help clean my guns :)

irish52084
May 26, 2011, 02:11 PM
Cleaning the gun is a great time to teach kids about guns. They get to see how it works and that they have to be maintained. Our oldest is 6 and he loves anything mechanical, especially custom cars and trucks. As soon as he figured out that a gun is a machine, just like a car, he was curious. We sat him down with us and gave him a rundown of how everything works and what it does. He retained a little bit of it, and he knows the safety rules.

It's a step by step process. Just got him started shooting the bb gun, and a little later he can move on to a .22 rifle.

Buzzcook
May 26, 2011, 03:34 PM
No matter how well you train your kids, you can't train their friends.

Keep guns and ammo locked up.

FAS1
May 27, 2011, 09:13 AM
My son is 2 years old and I have 3 pistols that are in our home. When I walk in my home I get him settled and put my edc g27 on a shelf next to my front door about 5 foot off the floor. Plenty far enough out his reach.

My experience is that a 2 to 3 year old can slide a dining room chair over to that area and then 5' isn't so high. I would reconsider where you keep your gun soon as his curiosity at that age will lead him into all kind of situations.

I grabbed my pillow pistol and cell because I immediately knew something was wrong. Would 5-10 extra seconds changed the outcome of the situation? Probably not but maybe.

I move a lot when I sleep so no telling where my gun would end up or what direction it would be facing when I grabbed for it. I think it would take me longer to get it than from my handgun safe mounted to my bed frame. You could leave the door open at night if that made you more comfortable until you practice opening it in the dark. It's actually very quick by feel with a little practice. Also, the gun is holstered (trigger covered) and in the exact same place and orientation every time. Works well for me.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/20955_248042271874_247921546874_3701205_3275758_n.jpg

kazanski612
May 27, 2011, 09:33 AM
To keep little hand off things the weapon, I bought a small pistol safe, and mounted it to my nightstand. during waking hours, the pistol was locked away in the safe, with a full magazine, but empty chamber. The key to this small safe was either on my person or hanging from a hook about 8 feet up and 3 yards from the safe. After the child was asleep, I would put the key in the lock. After retiring for the night, the safe would be open with my pistol inside.
Your kid never wakes up in the middle of the night?

My next door neighbor had relatives town and his 2-year-old niece shot herself in the head with his nightstand gun. Thank God she survived, but she's obviously not the same.

IMO, putting your firearm up high or out of reach as the only means of safety is an invitation for disaster. Just like everything, it's a risk vs. reward decision. And the risk of an unlocked firearm resulting in tragedy is awfully high.

But since I haven't seen anyone mention this yet, I consider my safe the second most secure place for my firearm; the first being on my person.

Be safe.

Eghad
May 27, 2011, 09:35 AM
Nice safe FAS1. I have a friend who is looking at small gun safes and yours fits the bill I will send him your website.

My friend researched every small gun safe on the market and was not happy with them.

$189.00 may seem like a lot but looking at this product its cheaper than having your kids find you pistol and shooting themselves not to mention the ease of access with that mount.

40caljustice
May 27, 2011, 06:53 PM
Those are some good points FAS1. Everyday that passes I can see his curiosities increase. I've thought long and hard, even since having replied to this post, on how to make things safer in our home. My pillow pistol stays in a holster that covers the trigger also and I pretty much stay still all night. Even taking these factors in count I realize I have to figure something else out. I'm just a little unsure if I like the idea of our possible lifeline locked in a safe. Ill have to take a look at them and see how I like bedside safes. Might be me just being paranoid. As for my gun by the front door on the 5 foot shelf. I've decided to get my carpenter neighbor to make an inconspicuous little safe. Maybe make it look like a clock. Something I can still pop open and retrieve my pistol if BG is knocking on the door. Does anyone know if they make something like this? It would be very difficult for him to slide a chair across the carpet. I can't do it I'm sure he can't. Though I see what you mean. If it was hardwood I'm sure he would have done it already. He pushes them all over the place already. I really thought my routine worked for me but after posting and rereading and reading others comments I have decided its time to change. Ill just keep my edc in the waistband until its nite nite time. Or maybe they make pajamas with in the waistband holsters? :D. Haha I'm kidding.

irish52084
May 27, 2011, 07:17 PM
I made a clock safe when I was in junior high. I'm sure you can make one on your own if you have some wood working skills. If not, there's plenty of amateur wood working guys that can do some really nice work and might do it for pretty cheap. Try craigslist or something like that if you want one made.

FAS1
May 27, 2011, 07:48 PM
I have decided its time to change.

That's a good thing and I'm sure you'll figure out what will work best for you.

dabo
May 28, 2011, 01:41 AM
Interesting thread! Thanks for the input, y'all! Grandbaby isn't yet 2 but there are some good ideas here! ;)

Dre_sa
May 28, 2011, 09:56 PM
Kazanski, I'm a very light sleeper, even the dog (miniature jack Russell) walking into the room would wake me up. We also had small bells on all of the doors to make noise, that way, I'd know exactly which door was moving and when.

dabo
May 29, 2011, 10:12 AM
I like the bedside finger-tip combination safe when kids are in the house...

coulter6
June 1, 2011, 05:00 PM
I have a GunVault. Easy to use and accessible under pressure.

youngunz4life
June 1, 2011, 06:02 PM
I have a locked pelican case which holds the rifle and shotgun unloaded. I have an electronic, combination safe for all ammo and all my other firearms(handguns). I store the handguns loaded. I also have other stuff in there like brass knuckles from key west(technically legal since they have a notch to hook on a belt), handcuffs, stungun, pepperspray, knives, hearing protection, flashlight, matches, etc. There is no room in my safe at all anymore.

kraigwy
June 1, 2011, 08:56 PM
I keep mine (S&W 642) in my pocket. Hard for any kids or anyone else to get a hold of it without me knowing.

Mr.Blue
June 1, 2011, 09:17 PM
I struggle with the original poster's question all of the time. I have a 4 year old daughter and over 30 guns. All of my guns, but 3 are stored unloaded in a secret room behind our closet that my child cannot access. You have to take off part of the wall-frame to access it.

Two of the loaded guns are stored in my nightstand and my wife's nightstand. Both guns are very hard to rack the slide and neither gun has a round in the chamber. I know many people discourage not keeping a round in the chamber with a HD gun, but I feel it is a good countermeasure against my daughter. My wife even has trouble racking my handgun's slide, but she has mastered hers. There is no way that my daughter could rack the slide if she happened to find the gun in our hidden nightstand drawers. My bedside gun also has both grip and trigger safeties.

The other gun is hidden in my library about 6ft. high behind books. This is a .357 revolver, so I really worry about this one. This room is off limits to her and has a child gate in front of it.

At this age, I am not so worried about it. In a few years, I will have to have the talk with her. At this point she knows they are dangerous and that no one touches them but daddy.

ConlawBloganon
June 2, 2011, 08:17 AM
I'm fortunate not to have to deal with having kids right now, but I imagine when I do, all my guns will be unloaded and/or locked up, and a single gun will be either on my body or in a quick-access safe, loaded because they don't shoot right unloaded.

spacecoast
June 2, 2011, 08:29 AM
As for my gun by the front door on the 5 foot shelf. I've decided to get my carpenter neighbor to make an inconspicuous little safe. Maybe make it look like a clock.

There's quite a selection available online, almost every gun-related site sells them too...

http://shop.ebay.com/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=m570&_nkw=clock+gun+safe

kazanski612
June 2, 2011, 08:56 AM
I struggle with the original poster's question all of the time. I have a 4 year old daughter and over 30 guns. All of my guns, but 3 are stored unloaded in a secret room behind our closet that my child cannot access. You have to take off part of the wall-frame to access it.

Two of the loaded guns are stored in my nightstand and my wife's nightstand. Both guns are very hard to rack the slide and neither gun has a round in the chamber. I know many people discourage not keeping a round in the chamber with a HD gun, but I feel it is a good countermeasure against my daughter. My wife even has trouble racking my handgun's slide, but she has mastered hers. There is no way that my daughter could rack the slide if she happened to find the gun in our hidden nightstand drawers. My bedside gun also has both grip and trigger safeties.

The other gun is hidden in my library about 6ft. high behind books. This is a .357 revolver, so I really worry about this one. This room is off limits to her and has a child gate in front of it.

At this age, I am not so worried about it. In a few years, I will have to have the talk with her. At this point she knows they are dangerous and that no one touches them but daddy.

I know that you're trying to keep your family safe by having firearms "at the ready" in case you need to stop an intruder, but I think you're being naive by assuming that a) your daughter could never rack a slide and b) that something 6' off the ground is out of reach.

http://www.corneredcat.com/Kids/kidstorage.aspx

Anything is reachable with enough motivation. Do your family a favor and lock 'em up. There are enough good safes out there that are fast + easy access that there's really no reason to use them, even in a nightstand.

triumph666
June 2, 2011, 10:46 AM
The biggest thing in having guns in the home around kids is to teach them at the earliest age how to Respect them...how to Handle them....how to Safely shoot them.....

My friend blew my friends brains out playing with a lever action 30/30 when we were 12.....his idiot dad never once taught him a damn thing about firearms....not even bb guns....

and when he (like all kids) went searching his parents room he found it buried in the closet and decided he wanted to show the cool cowboy rifle to my friend. when he operated the lever his finger was in the trigger guard and as soon as he closed action....a bullet went thru my friends chin and out the top of his head


DONT BE A FOOL.....DONT HIDE YOUR GUNS FROM YOUR KIDS.....TEACH THEM

coyote_5
June 2, 2011, 01:58 PM
I struggle with the original poster's question all of the time. I have a 4 year old daughter and over 30 guns. All of my guns, but 3 are stored unloaded in a secret room behind our closet that my child cannot access. You have to take off part of the wall-frame to access it.

Two of the loaded guns are stored in my nightstand and my wife's nightstand. Both guns are very hard to rack the slide and neither gun has a round in the chamber. I know many people discourage not keeping a round in the chamber with a HD gun, but I feel it is a good countermeasure against my daughter. My wife even has trouble racking my handgun's slide, but she has mastered hers. There is no way that my daughter could rack the slide if she happened to find the gun in our hidden nightstand drawers. My bedside gun also has both grip and trigger safeties.

The other gun is hidden in my library about 6ft. high behind books. This is a .357 revolver, so I really worry about this one. This room is off limits to her and has a child gate in front of it.

At this age, I am not so worried about it. In a few years, I will have to have the talk with her. At this point she knows they are dangerous and that no one touches them but daddy.

My wife really doesn't want to have a self defense weapon in the house because she hears all the anecdotal stories of children harming themselves or others with guns they found. I can't help but think that the quoted above is very often how these situations happen...NEVER underestimate the determination of a curious child. Please safeguard those weapons. There are numerous options that allow quick access in self defense situations but also keep the pistol safely out of curious hands.

Mr.Blue
June 2, 2011, 11:39 PM
I appreciate the advice and have locked up the revolver. I feel safe with the two nightstand semi-autos. My daughter is only 4 and cannot rack the slide. My wife barely can rack my XD45. Again, there is no round in the chamber. The guns are hidden in a false nightstand drawer. My daughter is not allowed to wander the house alone. There is a child/dog gate that keeps her from getting upstairs.

I will continue to increase her gun education as well.

I really believe that most accidents happen with a loaded chamber. Even if my daughter possessed the strength to rack the slide, there is no way she would even know to do so.

kazanski612
June 3, 2011, 09:32 AM
My daughter is not allowed to wander the house alone.

Wow, really? And she's 4?! Life in a SuperMax.

Do whatever you want, but IMO, this amounts to nothing more than "aahh, she knows better than try and play with one of my loaded firearms." Personally, I'll rely on a physical lock.

spacecoast
June 3, 2011, 10:10 AM
Life in a SuperMax

That's ridiculous. Just because some parents make the choice and the effort to keep track of their kids doesn't mean their home is a prison or that their actions are in any way out of line. From what you see on the streets and in the news a lot more parents could stand to re-examine their priorities in this area. Facebook should be a much lower priority than your kids, but you would never know it from the amount of time spent on each.

markj
June 3, 2011, 02:48 PM
some parents make the choice and the effort to keep track of their kids

My 4 year old girl was into everything all the time, and the questions were constant :) I miss them days she is now 22 and knows a lot about guns and such. I needed a GPS tacking system for her, one minute she was there, next over here.

I keep all my guns locked up except for the one. Why? not out of mis trust, but say she has a friend over, friend goes and sees the gun cabinet I once had my guns displayed in. He used a key got it open and took each gun out and put them back in but in diff spots. All were loaded, now what if he had pointed one at my girl and fired it and killed her? I would be liable for leaving a gun unsecured, yep is a law in a lot of states so check it out and be carefull. I now have them all locked up safe and sound except for the one.

Teach the kids yes, but lock them up so the kids friends, enemies, or whatever cannot get to them.

youngunz4life
June 5, 2011, 06:44 PM
I am like you, and I plan ahead since my oldest is 2 1/2 - the electronic safe is very, very quick access and cheap. someone(not a 4yr old) could walk off with the safe, but they couldn't open it and pull the trigger. I bought it because of my own fears. You seem to be on top of things, but remember your child will learn and pick things up much quicker than you think: example only, beginner's luck racking the slide, venturing thru parts of the house days and weeks before an old fart like you realizes it(pun only, I'm one too). If it worries you, its probably best to do something about it(like you did with the revolver). right now you're not worried about the nightstand so you are ok, but when 6?, 7?, you get the point

bdc2020
June 27, 2011, 09:52 PM
Most of these safe's I've seen mentioned in this thread (except for the huge one with 15 shotguns :p) seem made just for a single weapon and some magazines, etc.

Do most of you have multiple safes then or is everyone just mainly talking about these smaller safes for near the bed?

I'd like 1 bigger floor mount safe and then a small safe box which is quick to access (that is OK to hold 1 gun).

FAS1
June 28, 2011, 10:08 AM
Most of these safe's I've seen mentioned in this thread (except for the huge one with 15 shotguns ) seem made just for a single weapon and some magazines, etc.

Do most of you have multiple safes then or is everyone just mainly talking about these smaller safes for near the bed?

I'd like 1 bigger floor mount safe and then a small safe box which is quick to access (that is OK to hold 1 gun).

The OP asked how to store your HD handgun and have it accessible and that's why all the handgun safes. Yes I have both as they are separate needs.

Glenn E. Meyer
June 28, 2011, 11:30 AM
Your kid can't rack the slide until they can. How do you know this? You let them try it. Then they figure out how. There are videos of kids that age doing it.

I will be strong, if you think a kid can't rack and let them have access - you are making a very stupid mistake.

Rangefinder
June 28, 2011, 11:52 AM
Biometric lock-boxes are great for when the kids are very small. My oldest started shooting from my lap when he was about 4, shooting by himself at 6, and has since turned into one of the best young shooters (safety as well as ability) that I know of--not because I'm biased but because some of the pro's I shoot with use him on the competition ranges for a runner and spend a lot of time shooting with him free-form. He's still a teenager but among the old vets on the range he's just another of the guys with proven ability and full liberty with all our weapons. The trick here is to start them young, remove the mystery and awe, drill safety-safety-SAFETY into them right from the beginning. The constant use of a "don't touch" policy only moves to intensify the curiosity and desire to investigate on their own later--which will never be when you're around to intervene.