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View Full Version : Duty belts and home defense.


rburch
March 23, 2011, 12:19 AM
So I'm licensed as an armed security officer in my state, looking for a job as I'm moving, but that's another story.

My question is, I have a full dutybelt set up that fits my current HD/carry gun.

Since it's much faster to put on than any other holster I have, I've been putting my gun in it at night for home defense use.

My question is there a good reason not to do this?

The belt also has handcuffs, and oc spray on it, and I know the laws about civilian use of handcuffs kinda hard to justify. But would just having them on the belt cause issues?

I'm thinking it shouldn't, but thought I'd ask here too.

white96850turbo
March 23, 2011, 12:37 AM
Sounds like a good setup to me... Its always nice to be able to raise the level of force (OC to baton and last option pistol) if going hands on doesn't work. It's a very good idea to have cuffs if you ask me, and I don't see a problem with a civilian having them.

357 Python
March 23, 2011, 10:03 AM
I used to be an armed security officer years ago and did the same thing. The only thing I can see is that someone may think you are a cop and expect you to "take the suspect into custody". As an armed security officer in Virginia your arrest authority is limited and would not apply in this situation. That being said I personally would not worry about it. Most Police Officers don't like to handcuff a suspect alone, we do appreciate back up. All you would be doing at most is holding the suspect at bay until law enforcement arrives to properly arrest the suspect. If the bad guy decides to run for it, fine let him go and be a good witness.

BfloBill
March 23, 2011, 01:59 PM
The only problem I can see is what if you don't have time to put on the belt? There are some holsters out there designed for duty belts that would be difficult to get the gun out of if not actually on your body.
Do some trial runs and see if you have problems drawing the weapon while the belt is sitting on the floor/nightstand/dresser or wherever you plan to keep it.
If you have no trouble getting the gun out quickly, then I would say your idea is fine.
If you have trouble, then I would consider keeping the gun by the belt in case you need it quickly.

rburch
March 23, 2011, 05:29 PM
Using an Itac holster (clone of the serpa) and have checked this. Haven't found any problems getting it out of the holster while in my nightstand.

WC145
March 23, 2011, 08:11 PM
I don't understand why you would want to waste time putting on your gun belt if you're woken up in the middle of the night. When I go to bed my duty belt is hanging in the closet and my gun is on the nightstand with a Surefire G2 next to it. I have no interest in fumbling around for either if I need them nor do I plan to go H2H, use OC spray, or a baton against a home invader. If someone breaks into my house I'm not worrying about my force continuum and when I need to access my gun speed is of the essence. Since they would have to force their way into my home, my assumption that they are there with the intent to harm me and my family and that's not the time to be screwing around hoping the OC works or that I can beat them into submission with my ASP.

Glenn Dee
March 23, 2011, 11:29 PM
Dude...

Are we suggexting that one walk around the home in Pajama's wearing 9 pounds of duty belt?

Seriously?

ClydeFrog
March 23, 2011, 11:54 PM
I understand your concerns about security/home protection. I, too have both armed/unarmed security licenses in my state & work in the security industry.

I'd be concerned with your firearm's safety-security while it's not in your direct view. If you have small kids or any untrained adults in your home that could be a serious issue too.
As for a quick or rapid response, I'd suggest a body armor type tactical or maybe a safari/5.11 vest(with armor inserts) that contain your spare reloads or pistol magazines, OC spray, EDW-taser, white-flashlight, restraints-flexicuffs, your licenses/permits etc.
You could put on a armored vest or even a shoulder holster quickly and have your security gear close by.

For storage or regular security in the home, I'd look into a safe or gun locker-tool box that you can lock up or keep protected.

white96850turbo
March 24, 2011, 12:01 AM
Do you guys even know what you’re talking about?? Why wouldn't you want more options? In my area you can't just shoot / draw down on some guy for braking into my home... You have to think what would be considered a justified shoot (when you shoot you shoot to kill, aka "stop the threat"), and just because some guy is in your home doesn't mean you can shoot to stop the threat. If I were you, keeps the gun on your duty belt hanging on your bed post... Worst comes to worst just grab the gun, otherwise it's nice to have a place put your gun and grab cuffs if need be.

EDIT: what clydefrog suggested is a very good idea.

ClydeFrog
March 24, 2011, 12:40 AM
5.11 used to sell-market a useful/practical vest that had body armor in it.
They said it was good for PSCs(private security contractors), aid/government workers in disaster zones(like Haiti or SW Asia) or armed citizens who needed to carry a lot of gear/equipment.
www.USCav.com sold the line for around 2 years then suddenly ended it.
The 5.11 vests cost around $700.00-800.00 USD in the early 2000s.

old bear
March 24, 2011, 03:02 AM
Having your duty belt and vest ready is not a bad idea, but is it really practical, to be awakened out of a sound sleep and be expected to don a vest and gun belt? If you feel the need, do what the cowboys always did in the movies, sling your rig over the bed post.

Mr. Dee thanks for the great marketing idea, tactical pajamas, Kevlar material lots of over sized pockets and blousing bands sown into the cuffs. Do you think they would be available and sell well in a camo pattern?

BikerRN
March 24, 2011, 04:16 AM
I think it makes perfect sense.

Personally I use this in a handgun configuration.:

http://www.us-palm.com/index.php?option=com_products&view=product&id=10

With the pockets I can keep spare magazines, flashlight, and cell phone at my fingertips while affording myself some protection against incoming rounds.

Biker

scsov509
March 24, 2011, 05:13 AM
I keep my home defense gun in a duty rig at night as well, and do so for a few reasons. First, I like that it allows me to have my pistol secured in a holster no matter what I might or might not be wearing in the middle if the night. Second, a duty style holster is what I'm comfortable with from working in law enforcement, thus it keeps things consistent for me. Third, we've got kids running around here, and having my weapon secured in a holster makes my wife feel more comfortable.

I personally just use a simple setup with an older Safariland holster (weapon light compatible), flashlight pouch, and a double mag pouch. I could care less about OC, baton, radio, vest, etc; but I really do like the simple belt setup. It's easy on with a single buckle to snap, and certainly doesn't take me any longer to grab than if the gun was a sitting unholstered on a high shelf. YMMV

Tinner
March 24, 2011, 06:53 AM
What ever your most comfortable with is probably what you should do.Key is to practice retrieving it in dark..

LouCap
March 24, 2011, 07:20 AM
Dude...

Are we suggexting that one walk around the home in Pajama's wearing 9 pounds of duty belt?

Seriously?

My thoughts exactly...PJ's with pepper spray and an ASP dangling with your holster. Sexy.

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Tablet using Tapatalk Pro.

TailGator
March 24, 2011, 11:03 AM
I can't imagine how it would be faster to put on your duty belt and then draw rather than just grabbing your gun, whether it is in a drawer, a holster, or even a quick-access gun box (that last one, maybe). Perhaps we are misunderstanding the question?

white96850turbo: Do I understand correctly that in your jurisdiction, someone who already has forcibly entered your house has to show an even more overt threat before you can defend yourself and your family? Where do you live?

rburch
March 24, 2011, 11:27 AM
Dude...

Are we suggexting that one walk around the home in Pajama's wearing 9 pounds of duty belt?

Seriously?
My thoughts exactly...PJ's with pepper spray and an ASP dangling with your holster. Sexy.

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Tablet using Tapatalk Pro.

LOL, don't really wear pajamas. (unless boxers count)

My belt is fairly light, I don't know the exact weight, but I don't think it's 9 pounds. I don't have an asp yet, so that cuts down some weight.

It's a pretty basic set up, it's just keyholder, holster, handcuffs, glove pouch, oc spray, double mag pouch, flashlight holder.

I've checked it, and I'm much faster putting on this belt than any vest or shoulder holster I've got, and my paddle holster just doesn't work with my boxers. :o

No young kids, and everyone in the house has at least basic firearm safety.

rburch
March 24, 2011, 11:41 AM
I can't imagine how it would be faster to put on your duty belt and then draw rather than just grabbing your gun, whether it is in a drawer, a holster, or even a quick-access gun box (that last one, maybe). Perhaps we are misunderstanding the question?


No that is faster and the method I would use if I needed the gun right now (if they in the bedroom) I was more thinking that my house has a natural choke point in the stairs. All the bedrooms are on 2nd floor, so to get to anyone they'd have to come up that one stair.

So I fully plan to set up at the top of those stairs in the case of a break in, and call 911. I don't see any need to risk my life clearing the ground floor to protect our stuff.

My problem was figuring out how to get gun, flashlight, & cell phone to the top of those stairs. I don't have pockets unless I take time to put on pants, but if I have everything stuck in the duty belt when I go to bed, then as long as I bring the belt, I'll have all of that along with a can of OC and a couple of spare mags.

kraigwy
March 24, 2011, 11:43 AM
I see this when getting frisky with Misses, and that O.C. Spray goes off,

It ain't gonna be pretty.

rburch
March 24, 2011, 12:16 PM
I see this when getting frisky with Misses, and that O.C. Spray goes off,

It ain't gonna be pretty.

Very true, but the handcuffs....

Well nevermind, that's getting a bit far off topic.

Then again, I'm pretty sure my OC pouch velcros around the belt, so I should be able to take it off pretty easily when I don't need it on there.

WC145
March 24, 2011, 01:13 PM
LOL, don't really wear pajamas. (unless boxers count)

My belt is fairly light, I don't know the exact weight, but I don't think it's 9 pounds. I don't have an asp yet, so that cuts down some weight.

It's a pretty basic set up, it's just keyholder, holster, handcuffs, glove pouch, oc spray, double mag pouch, flashlight holder.

I've checked it, and I'm much faster putting on this belt than any vest or shoulder holster I've got, and my paddle holster just doesn't work with my boxers.

No young kids, and everyone in the house has at least basic firearm safety.

Again, I just don't see the need to be putting anything on. If someone breaks into my home in the middle of the night I need my gun and my light and my dogs and I'm ready. I certainly DON'T need to be strapping on a belt, donning a vest or any such thing, that's just wasting time. Hell, why would I want my gun in it's holster?? I want it in my hand in case I need to use it! This idea/desire makes no sense to me.

rburch
March 24, 2011, 01:50 PM
I agree the pistol in hand is best place for it, and that's where it would stay 99% of the time during a hd situation. But I can forsee multiple situations where having it in your hand wouldn't be practical.

That's where I feel having a holster available for use could be benefitial.

And honestly I am begining to rethink the idea some. It's begining to be more of a grab belt in my off hand while drawing pistol while moving to the stairs rather than putting the belt on.

Really the main purpose of the belt in that case is that my light, cell, mags, and gun are all in one item that I can carry in one hand.

The main issue is I want to have access to light, gun, and phone, but I'm not sure of a good way to manage all 3 items without pockets.

markj
March 24, 2011, 02:50 PM
is it really practical, to be awakened out of a sound sleep and be expected to don a vest and gun belt?

Nah, it goes on before going to bed......

My cousin leaves his gun in his duty belt, I would bet tho if someone broke in he would just grab the gun. Now I have a question to bug him with :)

Maj.Malfunction
March 24, 2011, 09:38 PM
Are you going to be able to use your gun, light and cell all at the same time? Even at the choke point you are vulnerable on the phone.

"Some one is in the house, Honey, call 911." Move to choke point gun and Light in hand.

Once you start on the phone you become distracted and a target. If you have someone to call 911, use them for that. If you don't, don't leave your room until you have called with the door locked, gun in hand.

my $.02

ClydeFrog
March 24, 2011, 11:19 PM
The use of handcuffs or restraints etc is a touchy subject and I can see the +/-of both sides.
If you have formal skill training(security, LE, corrections, spec ops-military) you may feel able to detain violent or unstable subjects in your home or on your property. It can be done correctly or safely under the proper conditions.
I'd suggest flexi-cuffs or the ASP type plastic "zip-ties" for a home owner.
They are lightweight but strong and can't really be used as a weapon the way metal or polymer type handcuffs can.
The member posts about practice or plans are good too. As stated before real home invasions or attacks are rapid, dynamic events mostly in low light.
Knowing where your weapon(s), lights, phones etc are and being able to repel violent, aggressive criminals is what's most important.

rburch
March 26, 2011, 06:26 PM
This thread is silly. I have this image of a homeowner donning vests, helmets and vests because they heard a noise. Not practical.

Yeah donning a tac-vest and helmet to check out a noise is a bit silly. But that's not the original point of this thread. I was asking originally if using a duty belt was practical in a home defense situation.

I've come to the conclusion, that in most cases it would be better just to grab the gun and flashlight, but it could be useful in certain situations to have a belt and holster that could be put on in just a few seconds.

FM12
March 27, 2011, 02:07 AM
You go with whats best for you!! Dont worry about all the naysayers, it's your bacon you have to protect, if it takes a wheelbarrow!!

ClydeFrog
March 27, 2011, 04:00 AM
I agree, when you wake up and hear a loud noise or have a break-in, you need to act quickly. To grab a firearm, white light & cordless/cell phone seems fastest but to don a armored vest or put a utility belt on with gear isn't that big of a reach.
The violent attack/family murder(s) in CT are a good example or the reported "Craigslist" attack where a family selling a jewelry item online turned into a violent home invasion with multiple subjects.

A security plan & the proper gear are what YOU choose.

Clyde

WC145
March 27, 2011, 08:51 AM
Just try to be a little extra careful snapping all that gear on if you sleep in the buff.:)