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argyle1812
March 21, 2011, 12:02 AM
I'm so tired of people talking about how Mosin Nagant rifles are the best thing ever. My father and i owned a 1929 MO mosin and a 1931 MO mosin both being hex receiver obviously. My father is one of the best marksmen i know and i dont consider myself a slouch. the absolute best grouping we achieved at 100 yards was about a 3.5 inch group. Not what i call a tack driver by any stretch of the imagination. Plus the fact that my fathers rifle always had feed problems despite being very well cleaned after every firing. I'm not saying Mosins are bad rifles i just think they are very overrated in every category. After all does ANY RUSSIAN gun have a reputation as super accurate out of the box?

osallent
March 21, 2011, 12:13 AM
Considering you only have two posts and this was your first post, am going to go out on a limb here and say: TROLL ALERT :eek:

Now that I properly identified you, let me answer your points one by one:

1) No one here to the best of my knowledge has said that the Mosin Nagant is the best rifle ever made. The Mosin Nagant was cheaply made, and during the war years the fit and finish was "rough" at best. However, the rifle is very rouged, can take a lot of punishment (as WWII showed) and keeps on going.

2) Accuracy is not going to be the same as a modern rifle, however, given the thousands of rounds and rough conditions that these rifles endured, they are fairly accurate considering the abuse they received.

3) The Mosin Nagant is not even the nicest rifle to shoot as far as recoil is concerned, but the 7.62x54R is a wonderful round, and I enjoy shooting it in my Mosin Nagant. Feeding problems? It's called rim lock...look it up, it is easy to solve.

4) What the Mosin Nagant has going for it is that it is a historic rifle with a great legacy (helped win WWII), and they are found dirt cheap...making them a great value for your money. If you don't have a lot of money and don't mind an old used rifle, you can't beat the Mosin Nagant's quality at that price point.

And last but not least....HOW CAN A $65 USD RIFLE THAT WORKS BE OVERRATED? :confused::eek:

Usertag
March 21, 2011, 12:15 AM
People only like them because they are cheap. The gun itself you can get for $70. and 500 rounds of surplus 7.62x54mmR is about $100.

Bamashooter
March 21, 2011, 12:19 AM
I killed a 200lb. doe at over 200yrds. with a mosin nagant and 174gr.S&B Ammo. You were getting 3.5'' groups which isnt too bad. Quality ammo would probably do better. Mosin's arent the be all end all some of them arent very accurate and some of them are very accurate. Either way what do you expect for $100.

osallent
March 21, 2011, 12:23 AM
I'll add one more thing to my answer above.....another of the charms of the Mosin Nagant is that because it is so inexpensive, you can do things to it that you would not dare do to another rifle....such as refinishing the stock or repainting the barrel. These are fun projects that can teach you a lot about gun smithing, woodworking, etc.:D:p:rolleyes:

argyle1812
March 21, 2011, 12:24 AM
I don't appreciate being called a troll. Also i wasn't saying this forum specifically thought the mosin was great that just seems to be the consensus online. Also i love the 7.62 x 54 round just don't like the gun that shoots its. except a dragunov. BTW i know about rimlock but to me a military rifle should be reliable out of the box.

kraigwy
March 21, 2011, 12:41 AM
best grouping we achieved at 100 yards was about a 3.5 inch group

You do realize that Mosins are shot in CMP GSM Vintage Military rifle matches don't you? To enlighten you, the X-10 ring of the 200 yard target used in such matches 3.5 MOA (or 3 1/2 inches at 100 yards). The average rifle is capable of cleaning the target, the reason they don't is the shooter not the rifle. Not many cleaned targets with any vintage military rifle.

my fathers rifle always had feed problems despite being very well cleaned after every firing.

Feed problems with the Mosin are shooter related, not rifle related, that is nothing to the bolt action to screw up, its about as simple as you can get. One on need to spend the time learning to shoot the thing. Dry firing will fix that.

I'm a CSM GSM Master Instructor and put on Vintage Military Rifle clinics. Often I see some one complaining about the Mosin "jamming" and some one next to him pick up the same rifle and make it sound like a semi-auto rifle.

The stripper clips for the Mosin are a bit different, they don't work like the clips for the Springfield, Enfield, Mauser, etc. It's really simple, and with a bit of practice one can load and fire the Mosin as fast as other surplus bolt guns.

To say they are over rated is kind of silly. I mean how do you "over rate" a $100 dollar rifle. The 3.5 MOA rifle you condemn is capable of hitting an E-Silhouette (man size) Military target to about 550 yards. It makes a great battle rifle for long distance shooting, well out preforming the AK. That's the reason the AK never really replaced it. The Mosin's were kept to extend the combat range of the infantry squad.

The Mosin is the oldest military rifle that's still being used throughout the world now, still being used in Afgan, and if you watch the news you'll see some floating around in Lybia.

No Sir, I don't think you can say the Mosin is over rated. Granted its not pretty, but pretty doesn't win gun fights.

I'm putting on a GSM Clinic on May 21st, I'm extending you an invitation to attend the clinic free of charge, bring your Mosin or use mine. I'll show you how to shoot it. Those suckers hold their own in the Vintage Rifle Matches.

raftman
March 21, 2011, 12:46 AM
Simply put, sounds like a poor workman blaming his tools.

argyle1812
March 21, 2011, 12:59 AM
Let me restate my position a bit. I understand where most of you are coming from. for 100 bucks i agree it is for sure not a bad rifle. But i never said it was just overrated. also my dads feed problem wasn't with a stripper clip it would jam up when trying to chamber a new round. lastly 3.5 moa at 100 yards might not be bad but my 190 dollar 1930 VZ 24 mauser will do 2 inch all day with surplus ammo.

kraigwy
March 21, 2011, 01:05 AM
How does it jam???????????

raftman
March 21, 2011, 01:07 AM
Let me restate my position a bit

Here's a better restatement of your position;

"I don't actually know how to load it"

argyle1812
March 21, 2011, 01:09 AM
it jams when he tries to chamber a new round somehow it binds and wont chamber. BTW the guns were replaced about a month ago with my mauser and a enfield NO4 mk1*

osallent
March 21, 2011, 01:13 AM
I read up on rim lock and how to avoid it before I went to shoot my Mosin Nagant for the first time. With the knowledge I gained from reading about rim lock online, I was able to properly load my Mosin Nagant and I had not one single failure.

ejhc11
March 21, 2011, 02:53 AM
You are not too familiar with Russian/Soviet/Russian ideology? Make more of everything is better than less of higher quality. In WWI and WWII they sacrificed their soldiers to the front line not to win but to used up their enemies bullets.

Make it cheap and plenty, if it turns out to be a good product then great.

Mosins are great, its for people who want to enjoy shooting and not spend a fortune at it.

Kreyzhorse
March 21, 2011, 07:01 AM
After all does ANY RUSSIAN gun have a reputation as super accurate out of the box?

I don't believe that these rifles were made to be super accurate nor have I seen any claims they are.

What I've seen is that they are reliable, cheap and fun to shoot. That's about all I expect from a rifle that I paid $80 for.

stubbicatt
March 21, 2011, 07:25 AM
The M/N is a fun rifle to shoot. It is inexpensive to buy. Most of them were used in one of the most horrific conflicts this planet has seen. As far as rating them goes, I don't immediately recall any such ratings.

If you do not enjoy yours, that is your experience. Your experience is as valid as that of anybody else.

Sounds like your interrupter might have been sticking a bit if you experienced rimlock with this design. Vigorous extraction and working the bolt with determination sometimes will nudge the interrupter back into action.

Coyote WT
March 21, 2011, 07:30 AM
I'm a new shooter so have no educated opinion on this topic so I'll offer my personal one.

I fell in love with the look of the rifle. I like the fact that it is not a reproduction and yes I do like walking out of the gun store fully loaded with weapon, accessories and ammo for under $200. Currently my shot group looks more like a shot gun pattern than a rifle shot group but that will come with more practice (do date I've only been to the range once with it).

Best gun ever? Not on your life. It is, however, fun as hell to shoot and I will take responsibility for the things I'm not good at yet.

This will probably be my gate way drug leading me to better, more modern and more expensive weapons. For all of these reasons it'll probably remain my favorite gun, my little Aleksandra.

jhenry
March 21, 2011, 08:10 AM
Jamming while attempting to chamber a round, not when trying to extract a round, IS the rim lock you stated you knew all about.

hornetguy
March 21, 2011, 08:28 AM
I'm in the group thinking, "How do you over-rate an 89 dollar rifle?" :confused:

Most of the threads on Mosins are from folks that are wondering just what they will get for their less-than-100bucks rifle.
For those folks, I usually answer that you CAN get a rifle easily capable of 2MOA accuracy (see my previously posted pics) that is ballistically equal to the wonderful 30-06 cartridge. That's not bad at all.
I would never say it's the "best ever", even in the mil-surp category. I would take nearly ANY Mauser over it, and have heard some pretty amazing things about the accuracy of some of the Swiss rifles... but, even by your own statement, we're talking at least DOUBLE the price of the Mosin.. sometimes SEVERAL times the price. Quality is usually relative to price. ;)

The Mosin has its quirks, and they can be frustrating, but once you get all that sorted out, I can't think of a better "truck" gun for nearly any kind of hunting. Well, except quail..:rolleyes:

That having been said, everyone has an opinion, and I appreciate you sharing yours. We all don't have to agree... makes for interesting discussions.

Now, about that Taurus Judge.....:D

BusGunner007
March 21, 2011, 08:50 AM
Hoping the OP comes back into his thread.

It would be good to re-start the 'newbie' status with a 'welcome', even though his first post was a little brash...:D

A lot of people may get some good info about the M-N, or pass some on to the OP with some links.

So, 'welcome', OP.
Don't be scared away or shy.
Come back in and lets use the forum for its intended purpose - to learn more.:)

twins
March 21, 2011, 08:55 AM
Now, about that Taurus Judge.....

The word "UGLY" doesn't do it justice. But the word "over-rated" does.

Argyle, sorry your MN 91/30s are giving you trouble. Just enjoy it for its intrinsic historical value instead of shooting value. I cuss mine out once in a while too (sticky bolt syndrome with surplus ammo that I've yet to resolved with all the tricks posted on the web) but it fits the niche of cheap fun. Kind of like plinking with a 22LR but with a bruised shoulder at the end. Every rifle is over-rated on the Internet so add the MN91/30 to the list and enjoy it for what it is.

And...WELCOME!

Hiker 1
March 21, 2011, 09:00 AM
I have a MN 1946 carbine. The ones made after WW2 are in significantly better condition. I shoot it all the time and always hit what I'm aiming at. Considering I paid less than $90, I never really considered whether or not it would fire MOA.

kx592
March 21, 2011, 09:05 AM
Twins: check your head space.

These ol' toys are great for what they are, there the best multi purpose tool I have in the house.

twins
March 21, 2011, 09:51 AM
Twins: check your head space.

KX, I haven't checked the headspace of the rifle (hopefully you're not talking about the space inside my head) so it may be the next thing on the list to do. But before I do that, the bolt sticks after rapid firing 4 or 5 rounds with surplus ammo. No sticky bolt with non-surplus or handloads. I'm guessing it has to do with the "coating" they put on these Yugo surplus ammo. The heat causes the case to stick till it cools?

I've done the prerequisite cleaning, steaming, bore paste, drown the chamber in hoppe's, varnish remover, etc.

I'm cheap and don't want to waste the surplus ammo when plinking with the 91/30. Otherwise, I'm happy with it while shooting handloads.

dahermit
March 21, 2011, 10:12 AM
Considering you only have two posts and this was your first post, am going to go out on a limb here and say: TROLL ALERT
What difference does it make that he has only two posts here...he may have had hundreds on other gun forums. You only have 66 posts...you must be a troll.

Calling, "Troll alert", is pointless, childish, and serves no purpose. If you think he is a troll, DO NOT RESPOND TO HIS POST. A controversial posting is not "trolling", it is providing input for stimulating debate.

That being said, my experience with a Russian 1943 Mosin-Nagant carbine, is that it is difficult to operate (very stiff bolt compared to the M98 Mauser), took excessive pressure to load with stripper clips, had terrible triggers, very ugly finish on the utilitarian wood. Other than that, they only cost what they are worth.

salvadore
March 21, 2011, 10:40 AM
Nicely said Dahermit. No one has called a "future lawyer alert" after all.

doofus47
March 21, 2011, 10:41 AM
Can you buy a $90 deer-killer anywhere else that is Minute of Buck accurate and will not fail under extreme weather/environmental conditions?

There are several problems related to storage (primarily cosmoline) that are common to all equipment stored for decades. MNs are no exception. The solutions to these issues are fairly easy to find on line.

Eagle0711
March 21, 2011, 11:19 AM
Looking at it's historical record, I think that it was effective for Russian Sniper Vasili Zaitsev. At the Battle of Stalingrad he killed nearly 100 Germans including the Germans top sniper, Major Koning. He killed over 400 Germans during ths war. I guess it depends on who is pulling the trigger.

aarondhgraham
March 21, 2011, 12:09 PM
It's the same reason that British .303's and German 8mm Mausers were so popular in the early-mid 60's.

They weren't especially great tack-driving rifles either,,,
But you could order a .303 from Alden's Catalog for only $14.95,,,
The German 8mm Mauser was a bit more of an expensive gun at $19.95,,,
I mean if you wanted to go cheap, you could get a 7.7 Japanese rifle for only $9.95

Those guns and those low prices are gone now,,,
The replacement is the ba-jillions of Nagants that have hit the surplus market.

I don't think anyone ever said,,,
Oh Wow! A real live genuine Mosin Nagant finally available!

I think what they said was,,,
Oh Wow! A real live 30 caliber rifle for only $90.00!

Aarond

Yellowfin
March 21, 2011, 12:22 PM
It's interesting to see what they can do with accurate ammunition.

argyle1812
March 21, 2011, 01:37 PM
hello everyone im sorry if my post can across as being brash i did not mean it like that. i agree that for less than 100 dollars you cant go wrong. but around here in washington state a non war year mosin is often 150-175 dollars and i got my mauser for 190. Thanks to Twins for actually understanding my position!

Mutatio Nomenis
March 21, 2011, 04:12 PM
It's a mother ugly love it or hate it. /mystatement.

Slamfire
March 21, 2011, 04:27 PM
I bought a number of Finnish Nagants and a few Soviet back when they were $69.00

I have had rim lock. Sometimes you get an interference between the cartridge stack and the round going into the chamber. I believe it is a combination of rim diameter and interrupter tolerance stack up.

Heck, I have had rim lock with my 375 H&H. The belt on the top round jammed on the rim of the round below it.

Rim lock is another good reason why rimmed rounds were obsolete the day the 8mm Mauser was introduced.

All my Nagants, including the M39's, have substandard trigger pulls. I recently handled some Finnish target rifles that had excellent pulls, I wish I knew what was going on under the wood. The trigger/sear mechanism on a Nagant while simple, is not simple to adjust to a fine trigger pull. The best I could do was swap sears out.

As for accuracy, Nagants do surprisingly well even when horribly bedded. With a good barrel they will shoot 3 MOA which is service rifle accuracy. Folks have this idea that service rifles are target weapons, accuracy the primary consideration. Accuracy was a consideration, along with others, and how accurate the rifle depended on how much weight was put on that factor. Based on an examination of old bolt gun performance, I believe 3 MOA was what most Militaries thought was an acceptable average. You have rifles like the K31 that are better, and you have some that shoot a little worse.

Pre WW1 infantry was expected to engage targets at ridiculous distances, just look at the rear sight elevations graduations for proof of that. What the military did was determine the target size and distance. If the target is a human, then the rifle has to hit the human at the specified distance. The target might be a human head, human torso, etc. Anyway if you thing you are going to hit a human at 1000-800 yards, then your rifle has to shoot something close to 3 MOA.

By the time you get to WWII, the military figured out the average infantry man could not hit a thing and 300 yards became the accepted combat space. AK’s are what 5-7 MOA?, just fine for untrained cannon fodder.

Hey, the Nagant is an 1880's design. It was was obsolete the day the M1892 Mauser was introduced in service but it still clunks on. It has proven itself reliable in every environmental condition on earth. It was killing Germans in the Arctic regions, it killed Americans in the swamps of Vietnam.

If you want more performance, you gotta pay more than $100.00 But for $100.00, a Nagant is a steal.

rickyrick
March 21, 2011, 04:28 PM
I just realized that the mosin nagant is the mini-14 of the 30 caliber mil-surps......


I say most of the posts offer fair descriptions of th M-N

CUBAN REDNECK
March 21, 2011, 05:06 PM
I have a carbine version. A fun gun to shoot with lots of cheap ammo. What can go wrong? :)

MikeG
March 21, 2011, 08:12 PM
Jamming on feeding isn't only caused by rim lock. If the interruptor-ejector doesn't move freely for lack of oil or dried cosmoline, or the stock not being relieved for it it'll jam. Also, the Mosin Nagant should be operated with some gusto and not babied.
Once you understand the rifle and it's quirks, it is a good rifle.

osallent
March 21, 2011, 08:35 PM
Sorry for calling you a troll, it's just that you came off kinda strong against the Mosin Nagant in your first post in The Firing Lane, and it initially seemed more like a rant to get people riled up. Anyway, welcome to the forum. Hope you decide to stay.

.300 Weatherby Mag
March 21, 2011, 08:38 PM
If you say that a mosin nagant is not accurate... You've never got your hands on an accurate Finn or a m91 built by Remington or Westinghouse... My Remington built m91 is an easy sub 2 MOA gun...

4runnerman
March 21, 2011, 08:52 PM
I'm putting on a GSM Clinic on May 21st, I'm extending you an invitation to attend the clinic free of charge, bring your Mosin or use mine. I'll show you how to shoot it. Those suckers hold their own in the Vintage Rifle Matches.
__________________
Hey craigwy-- I hate them thing to:D;) Is offer good to me too:D
Just kidding,,,Very nice offer you make.

kraigwy
March 21, 2011, 09:01 PM
I'm putting on a GSM Clinic on May 21st, I'm extending you an invitation to attend the clinic free of charge, bring your Mosin or use mine. I'll show you how to shoot it. Those suckers hold their own in the Vintage Rifle Matches.
__________________
Hey craigwy-- I hate them thing to Is offer good to me too
Just kidding,,,Very nice offer you make.

Yeap it is. Actually I don't charge for my clinics unles you want CMP ammo furnished. Then I only charge actual cost of the ammo.

4runnerman
March 21, 2011, 09:07 PM
Dang guy if it just was not so far to drive. I would take ya up on it for sure.
World needs more of you around.

tobnpr
March 22, 2011, 09:10 AM
"Super-Accurate"?
I don't know what that is, but the MN would not qualify.

That being said, here is the MN sporter I've just finished:

http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb294/tobnpr/IMAG0189.jpg


And, these are the two groupings I shot with it, first time ever fired, SURPLUS ammo...

First seven shots, upper right. Couple of fliers, could've been me...
Dialed the scope down and left, all but two shots of the next ten were in the diamond.

http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb294/tobnpr/IMAG0188.jpg


Took it out to 225 yards a couple of weeks ago- with my first run of handloads. 6" plates, the rifle did not miss once I had zeroed the scope. Now, granted, all I can say from that is sub 3 MOA..but I will be taking paper as well as steel this weekend.

Since then, I've added a Limbsaver recoil pad and more importantly, a Timney trigger. I'm confident that with the handloads, the rifle will shoot 2 MOA or better, if I do my part.

"Super Accurate", hell no. We've got a .308 Savage and a .223 Remington 700 that'll embarass it. But that wasn't the point of my project. I wanted to see if I could build a "decent" long range rifle on the cheap, capable of ringing steel out to 600-800 yards. The 7.62 x 54R is easily capable of precision at that distance.

I've got a fun-to-shoot, durable rifle for not much $$ (well, not including the Vortex glass :)) that's way more accurate than "minute of deer".

Everyone needs to bear in mind that shooting these rifles outta their crappy wood original stocks cannot be compared to a modern rifle in it's stock.
Put it in a Boyd's (or other aftermarket) bed the action and install pillars, free-float the barrel- and you've got a whole different rifle.

IMO, the most important thing is to have a nice shiny bore, with well defined lands. Mine was a plain, re-arsenaled 91/30. Slugged the bore ( a requirement for handloading) and it eats up .311 Matchkings...

For collectors, bore/chamber condition is a consideration, not an overriding factor.
If you want a shooter, it's the main consideration, IMO.

OsOk-308
March 22, 2011, 09:30 AM
I don't appreciate being called a troll. Also i wasn't saying this forum specifically thought the mosin was great that just seems to be the consensus online. Also i love the 7.62 x 54 round just don't like the gun that shoots its. except a dragunov. BTW i know about rimlock but to me a military rifle should be reliable out of the box.


It's not out of the box. This Rifle is 70+ years old. Having been a military rifle, it has probably gone through a lot of wear and tear. My M38 kicks like a mule, but that one is pretty accurate. I've taken it on elk hunting trips and I've read stories about people hunting bear with them. It's a rugged rifle that gets the job done. May not be as accurate as a Remington 700, but that's not what it was designed to be.

As far as accuracy goes, the links below show that these two men would beg to differ. Simo Häyhä in fact recorded the most sniper kills of any major war with his mosin nagant. Just because you have two that you might not shoot well doesn't disqualify the millions of other nagants that were made.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasily_Zaytsev

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simo_H%C3%A4yh%C3%A4

Sarge
March 22, 2011, 09:35 AM
I've never quite understood the allure of the Mosin either, but I grew up shooting Mausers, '03 Springfields and Enfields.

Eagle0711
March 22, 2011, 05:24 PM
I looked up that info. on wikipedia and it's very impressive. If this is a 3 MOA rifle how could three shots kill tree Germans at 800m ?

rickyrick
March 22, 2011, 05:45 PM
I have a no 4 Enfield and a mosin nagant the Enfield feels like a feather compared to the m-n , accuracy of both seem about the same. I haven't done a side by side shoot with them. Now the mosin is in better condition but the Enfield has been in my family for almost a half century.

Slamfire
March 22, 2011, 05:47 PM
I looked up that info. on wikipedia and it's very impressive. If this is a 3 MOA rifle how could three shots kill tree Germans at 800m ?

If all rifles had to meet a 3 MOA standard, just due to the variences in manufacturing some rifles are going to be 3 MOA rifles, others less than 3 MOA. Might even be a 1 MOA rifle just to the luck of the draw.

It is entirely possible that sniper rifles were above average.

At 800 yards, 3 MOA is 24 inches. Think you could hit a 24 inch target at 800 yards? If the shooter is experienced and has good wind dope and elevation, I believe it can be done.

Besides, I meet people in the store who are way over 24 inches wide. Maybe these were extra large Germans in those trees. :D

TX Hunter
March 22, 2011, 06:26 PM
I like the Mosin Rifle, They are fun, and it isnt just because they are cheap.
I actually like the rifle.

ethan95
March 22, 2011, 06:34 PM
These guns are popular for 3 reasons

1) There cheap, and work well

2) They shoot relativity well

3) The eastern block surplus ammo is inexpensive considering the caliber size.

And the gun does all this while looking damn good.

sc928porsche
March 22, 2011, 07:14 PM
Although I am a Mauser fan and 90% of my rifles are made from them, I find nothing really wrong with the MN. Ive seen its accuracy vary anywhere from 2" to 4" depending on condition of the rifle.

The cartridge is quite capable for hunting purposes. If you can bring it down with a 30-06, you can also bring it down with the MN.

There are a lot of aftermarket items that you can purchace to enhance the looks and the accuracy of the rifle. Doing some of this can be quite entertaining and give you hours of pleasure not to mention that ammo is quite cheap and they are enjoyable to shoot.

For someone just getting into hunting and shooting it allows them to do so without a lot of expense and can be upgraded a bit at a time.

To sum it up, there is nothing like having a Fararri, but an old Chevy or Ford truck can usually get the job done.

jhenry
March 22, 2011, 07:21 PM
My 1943 Finn M39 Sako with a slightly worn bore and crown will put czech surplus into 1.5" at 100 meters with a good man on the trigger. It has a 1916 Ishy receiver. I also have a M38, no 91/30 yet. My own opinion is that the M39's are the best of the breed.

Mutatio Nomenis
March 22, 2011, 09:01 PM
It's beside the topic, but don't you need a C&R for a Nagant?

raftman
March 22, 2011, 09:31 PM
It's beside the topic, but don't you need a C&R for a Nagant?

Only if you want the Mosin-Nagant mailed straight to your house.

A C&R license isn't some sort of license that allows you to possess certain firearms not available to those that don't have said license... it merely allows the C&R licensee to directly obtain qualifying firearms (specifically those on the C&R list) without going through the FFL transfer process (if ordering from out of state, for example). The gun can be sent straight to purchaser.

These same firearms (those on the C&R list) can most certainly be owned by someone without a C&R license, for example, I myself don't have a C&R, but have several C&R-eligible firearms, including a Mosin M44. Only difference is, if I were to mail-order a C&R firearm, it has to go to a local FFL dealer, who will then (for a small fee) transfer it to me, perform the background check and so forth. If I had bothered with getting a C&R, all of those firearms could instead have come straight to my house and I would merely have to log their acquisition appropriately.

Mutatio Nomenis
March 22, 2011, 09:42 PM
^ Thank you. 10char

Buzzcook
March 22, 2011, 10:02 PM
I have heard people wax a little rhapsodic over their new Mosin.
It's normal to speak highly of your new girl even if she isn't the prettiest at the hop.
Compared to its peers the Mosin isn't the nicest gun around. Compared to the job those guns were supposed to do it was as good as any.

Fat White Boy
March 22, 2011, 10:08 PM
Mosins are multi-functional... I use mine as a tire tool, a jack handle, the bayonet as a fire place poker, the flash from my M44 to start camp fires and it still shoots fine!!

Eagle0711
March 23, 2011, 02:25 PM
^ Thanks Slamfire, thats a good explanation.

Stephanie B
March 23, 2011, 02:45 PM
I picked up an ex-sniper MN for $110 at a gunshop. It showed promise, so I installed a Mojo rear sight.

With Wolf/Privi Partizan 180gr rounds, it is as good an open-sight rifle as I could want and, for less than $200 all-up, that's pretty hard to hate.

8shot357
March 26, 2011, 12:25 AM
Post #44

Sarge

I've never quite understood the allure of the Mosin either

I bought a almost mint one (M44) for $100, can't get a Mauser that price everyday if ever.

Hell, www.Aimsurplus.com is selling one (1891/30) in very good condition for $69.95+shipping. The one I got is beautiful, as is the rifling.

zombieslayer
March 26, 2011, 09:13 PM
"My 1943 Finn M39 Sako with a slightly worn bore and crown will put czech surplus into 1.5" at 100 meters with a good man on the trigger. It has a 1916 Ishy receiver. I also have a M38, no 91/30 yet. My own opinion is that the M39's are the best of the breed".

_________________


I scored a solid M39 in a bargain rack at a local pawn shop for $150. Its a really good shooting rifle, and is my favorite milsurp. I also have an SMLE and a Mauser._

Singlesix1954
March 27, 2011, 05:40 PM
Ok my 1938 Mosin shoots realy good (1 inch groups from the bench @ 100yds) are the norm. It has had a trigger job making it a 2lb pull as oposed to the 19 plus lb trigger it had when I got it. I bought it as kind of a joke with a buddy because it was to cheep to pass up when we found nice ones. Now it is no match for my pre 64 .308 win featherweight, or some of my other toys. In fact I'm sure my 92 Krag and my 1903 Springfield will out shoot it. That said it does shoot good enough to be fun. If someone needed a cheep rifle with cheep ammo to take to the range, or hunt coyote to deer sized game with there is nothing wrong with one. So I don't think it is overated. Just misunderstood and bashed by folks who are kind of snobish.

Old Time Hunter
March 27, 2011, 08:12 PM
I'm in the group thinking, "How do you over-rate an 89 dollar rifle?"

My sentiments also...and I've never paid over $69 for one.

Minute of man is all that was called for.