PDA

View Full Version : Bedroom fortification


sirsloop
March 6, 2011, 02:18 PM
There have been some threads about home security lately and it has me wondering. I know my house is not entry proof. Its virtually impossible to prevent someone from entering my house given all the windows and glass on the doors. I really would need to replace all my doors with no-glass doors, reinforce all of the jambs with metal, and put bars on windows. The wife will never go for that not to mention it would be ugly and cost a fortune.

It got me thinking about replacing just my bedroom doors with a solid wood or maybe even metal doors, metal door jamb reinforcement, and possibly a digital deadbolt combo lock for the outside. At night we could simply close the door, which locks automatically, and be sure that it would take more than a few kicks to break into the bedroom. The upstairs windows are much more difficult to reach that downstairs, and I would want those open anyways in case of a fire.

Also, I have also been thinking about putting a battery powered light at the top of the stairs in front of our bedroom door. I the event of a power outage, or if someone maliciously cuts power to the house the light at the top of the stairs would turn on, powered by battery. If its a normal outage, great I can see whats going on. If someone cuts the power, they will be a little less tempted to come upstairs knowing they are fully illuminated, not to mention their night vision is completely shot.

Anyways, if someone breaks into my house they can take whatever they want and hopefully the cops arrive before they escape. If they want to come upstairs for whatever reason, I don't want easy access to our bedroom and they had better hope they don't try coming through that door!

Comments? Additional ideas?

jrothWA
March 6, 2011, 03:25 PM
first add new deadbolt locks on the door, they will need to be the type that a key is used for locking from inside.

Had a house with 4X4 panes next to standard lock, add the keyed deadbolt, and put a spare key where it was known to family to open and get out.

Add motion detecting lights to exterior doors and elevate on standalone buildings, key is to illuminate and SILHOUETTE objects, do not have lights positioned to illuminate you inside the house.

It sounds like you are an ISOLATED area?? Is your power line overhead or underground.

Careful, on the door, as you may limit your egress in case of fire.

Review your tenative plans, a bit of refinement is needed.

sirsloop
March 6, 2011, 03:32 PM
Egress would not be hindered if we were upstairs and needed to escape quickly (fire). We still have the option to bail out the windows, or leave the bedroom through the door. The door would just be locked and would require someone to turn a deadbolt in order to exit. If you know the combo you can easily enter.

The idea here is that even with a completely impenetrable exterior door there are tons of windows that can be broken for quick entry into the house. I'm not puttin up bars on them. How else could I ensure some response time if the BG breaks one of the windows clear across the house in the basement, slips in, then wanders upstairs?

I'm in suburbia NJ, high population density, quiet neighborhood, dead end street, bright street lighting, motion sensor floods outside, 4' chain link around the property, overhead power line, easily accessible and somewhat secluded window near the main breaker panel. We have very low foot and street traffic. I typically notice when a car comes down the hill, can recognize most of my neighbors cars simply by sound and the lights.

Eagle0711
March 6, 2011, 03:57 PM
While creating sort of a " Panic Room " that is hard to break in to, you must think about someone getting in your house while you are gone and waiting for you.

I saw an actual case on Hard Evidence where this couple arrived home at 2:00 AM and were going to bed when someone evidently stepped out of a closet that he or she had been hiding in and shot each 5 times, then left.

The couple were dead and the case remains unsolved. This occured in Topeka Kansas in a low crime area.

Being armed and prepared always, and expect the unexpected is best.

bcrash15
March 6, 2011, 04:22 PM
If you are going to do the bedroom door, and your plan sounds reasonable, just make sure you go all the way. It's only as strong as the weakest link. Optimally you could reinforce the frame with an extra layer of 2x4s but that might be a huge undertaking under the drywall. Many people get by with some long screws and sturdy hinge/deadbolt hardware. I also like to sink a metal plate into the frame around where the deadbolt goes (if it is not otherwise reinforced) and screw it into the wood in several places. When you are door shopping, make sure you get one that is truly strong. I have seen solid wood doors that have cracked from slamming them hard. Heavy duty usually equates to just plain heavy, so that is one quick indicator of a doors quality.

Bullet94
March 6, 2011, 06:30 PM
sirsloop

It got me thinking about replacing just my bedroom doors with a solid wood or maybe even metal doors, metal door jamb reinforcement, and possibly a digital deadbolt combo lock for the outside.


I’ve been thinking about this too. At least when your asleep you would wake up before the BG entered. if he could. Sounds like a great idea!!

sirsloop
March 6, 2011, 06:48 PM
Someone linked these in a different thread.

http://www.amazon.com/Safe-Homes-International-55724-Reinforcer/dp/B003P5KJJO/ref=sr_1_15?ie=UTF8&qid=1299455129&sr=8-15

Those, sturdy hinges, strong door, strong digital deadbolt... all equals a door that will be quite hard to kick in without looking awkward or out of place. Sure if you gave a 2nd look to the door you would wonder why there is a combo on there.

Added bonus... if we ever have a dog sitter, maid, family members, CHILDREN... they will not have access to that room which contains loaded firearms, and other valuables.

leadcounsel
March 8, 2011, 05:56 AM
I use several sets of eyebolts on either side of my door, screwed deep into the studs. A couple 4' lengths of rebar across the door. That'll be a timely, noisey mess to kick through, and they'll be waiting to face a 12 gauge when they have one leg stuck through the door, peering through the holes...

markj
March 8, 2011, 04:18 PM
I have known a few folks put a steel plate in the wall facing the rest of the house, steel framed metal wood looking door. My cousin installs this stuff in this area. Many homes now have a "safe room" he has installed.

egor20
March 8, 2011, 11:28 PM
I have a solid oak door with a dead bolt and metal door jambs on the bedroom door, if BGs break in we're bunkering down and calling in the cavalry (both) the Sheriffs and the State police. I would also recommend a home security alarm with a LOUD alarm and flashing lights, just not in the bedroom.:D

I'd also advise a dog, (even a little ankle bitter that yips loudly) as a good early warning system.

I'm not in the "middle of nowhere" but I cans see it from my attic windows, police response time is going to be about 20 mins. We keep my our respective handguns in the bedroom and a Benelli M3 with extra #4 shot and slugs.

sdw1961
March 9, 2011, 06:48 AM
Sorry...don't know how to quote...this is in response to the above post from
"Eagle0711
Senior Member

Expect The Unexpected
While creating sort of a " Panic Room " that is hard to break in to, you must think about someone getting in your house while you are gone and waiting for you.

I saw an actual case on Hard Evidence where this couple arrived home at 2:00 AM and were going to bed when someone evidently stepped out of a closet that he or she had been hiding in and shot each 5 times, then left.

The couple were dead and the case remains unsolved. This occured in Topeka Kansas in a low crime area."

My reply----This just terrified me. I rent a mobile home that can't be reinforced. Had someone (thinking a kid) TRY and break in one night while I was sleeping...the only thing I have here to protect me is a baseball bat. Uggh! The world is getting so mean and people are getting so bold and hateful.

Eagle0711
March 9, 2011, 02:50 PM
Yes, that case was terrifying. If a dog was in the home his or her behavior would let you knoe if someone was inside.

One could open doors to closets and so forth with a handgun held close to your body and sort of pie it out as you look inside.

On this mornings news a woman came home to find a burglar in her bathroom. Lucky for her he wasn't dangerous, and the police were called.

Good luck with your project. The fact that you are aware and prepared will make it very difficult for the bad guy. They'll likely go where it will be easier for them. If it's a case of possible revenge against you be aware of any possible suprise ambush.

Don P
March 9, 2011, 03:44 PM
Fort Knox, White House. All other places with the things we do to deter break ins will only be deterrents. Lights would be helpful as well as dead bolts properly installed

JC57
March 9, 2011, 11:34 PM
For reinforcing a door jamb to make it virtually breach proof, consider Door Jamb Armor - they have several options and fairly reasonably priced

http://www.armorconcepts.com/

Watch the various "Does it work?" news shows that they link to.

Something else that's great for securing a door without any remodeling is the Katybar. http://www.katybar.com

Keep in mind with any "safe room" set up that you might just need an ambulance some day (heart attack, fallen and can't get up) and the paramedics will have to get through all of that protection to get to you. Just something to consider.

My house has a single doorway to a hall that leads back to the bedrooms and bathrooms. It appears that a previous resident at one point had a separate lock on that door (she was an elderly lady living alone), so I suppose she was using it as a refuge area in case someone broke in at night.

I've considered replacing that door and jamb with a quality metal door and a reinforced frame (similar to the ArmorConcepts product), but I would need to cut a cat-flap into it to let our kitties come and go (they like to sleep on us when it's cold).

So not a bad idea, just have to consider all the options.

Jake Balam
March 10, 2011, 12:10 AM
I read bedroom fortifications and immediately thought pillow fort

Alaska444
March 10, 2011, 01:19 AM
I placed a 2X6 plank barricade on our bedroom door that we put in place every night. I placed two very large screws directly into the door frame for an L-frame bracket that holds the large plank in place. If the BD can break through a door backed up by a 2X6 plank and 4 locks, then even Arnold isn't going to stop him, they would not be human. There is enough give in the door and the locks to absorb much of the impact before they get to wood plank.

The purpose is to give me time to get to my weapon a couple of feet away. We have additional protection on our doors and windows but as mentioned, no method is 100%. Nevertheless, all I am looking for is the tactical edge and then turn them over to mister Ruger and mr. Winchester for the rest of the story.

motorhead0922
March 10, 2011, 01:29 PM
I'd start with an alarm system. But there's just the 2 of us and we don't close the BR door.

If you do make your safe room, don't forget to put a front door key on a big stick that you can throw out your window to police, if you have to barricade yourself in.

powderball
March 10, 2011, 03:55 PM
Make the doors are as safe as you need them to be, to feel comfortable. Have a shotgun right by your bedside. It can be your best friend in a bad situation. As for a light...the dark is your friend. Just don't shoot someone you love, by accident. If you need a light, then make sure the intruder lights up...not you. Goodluck...Lock and load...

Stevie-Ray
March 10, 2011, 05:15 PM
I saw an actual case on Hard Evidence where this couple arrived home at 2:00 AM and were going to bed when someone evidently stepped out of a closet that he or she had been hiding in and shot each 5 times, then left.

The couple were dead and the case remains unsolved. This occured in Topeka Kansas in a low crime area."I clear my house everytime I walk in, if we're both gone. Both houses that is. My primary home is easy, though it has a basement, it's rather small, and the upstairs is locked with a barrel bolt, which can't be locked by whomever might be upstairs. So, if the bolt is locked I don't have to check upstairs. Closets are all but impossible to hide in. The house up north will be my future home and it's far larger and includes walk-in closets, so I check these whenever we go up, or come back from somewhere. The wife is always asking why, but she's oblivious to dangers and I've grown immune to her rolling her eyes over the years. This all pre-supposes that everything looks normal when we arrive, of course. If I thought there was a better than slim chance of somebody being in there, due to evidence of some kind, the police would clear it for me. Neither of my areas are considered high-crime, but we've had our share of scares.

sirsloop
March 10, 2011, 08:12 PM
IDK... a house clear every time you come home seems a little excessive. Comments about the dog are spot on tho. My dog would certainly let me know if someone else was in the house, or would be found missing/dead moments after I walked in the door.

sirsloop
March 10, 2011, 11:32 PM
Lol... you could call installing a locking doorknob on your front door "fortification".

glockcompact
March 11, 2011, 12:12 AM
My wife and I had a house alarm installed about 6 months ago. I love it. It's not the perfect barrier, but it is better than not having one. You can even turn on the motion detectors at night while you are at home in bed. We have a control panel at the garage door for entry and we have one in the master bedroom.

Alaska444
March 11, 2011, 12:26 AM
We have multiple layers of defense starting with 4 outside lights front, side and back, a street light in front of our house and security doors front and back. We have bars on three of our windows that the highest risk area on the side and back of the house and the rest of the house has ACE security glass that they claim is bomb resistant, not just bullet resistant. All windows have screw on individual locks. These defenses are for the smash and grab creeps.

We have a full alarm system with inside motion detectors that we put on every night when we do not have kids or friends over. We have a double door to our bed room with four locks on it backed up by the 2X6 plank. All of these fortifications are designed to slow the creeps down if they get through the first layer of defense to give me the time to get to my assortment of weapons and ammo readily available at all times.

When we enter our house, we always listen for the alarm to beep. If it doesn't, then I check the entire house from top to bottom before relaxing my vigilance.

Lastly, my wife and I watch ID, Dateline and other crime based TV shows of real life events just to stay paranoid enough to keep up the watchfulness and preparation. I have a new condo up north that I will have to "zombie" proof as well but won't be able to use bars on any of the windows because of CCRs. But up there, I can at least carry my weapons with my CCW permit so that puts me one step ahead of any bad guys since that goes with me everywhere.

It is more a state of mind than the actually barriers that is the most important in securing home defense options.

Bullet94
March 11, 2011, 01:05 AM
Alaska444

We have a double door to our bed room with four locks on it backed up by the 2X6 plank

The 2X6 plank sounds good to me or maybe 2X6 steel tubing instead of wood.

Alaska444
March 11, 2011, 02:20 AM
It aint the prettiest thing in the world, but I truly believe it would give me the time I need if ever presented with that terrible situation.

markj
March 11, 2011, 03:37 PM
I clear my house everytime I walk in,

Even if it is as when you left? Maybe an alarm?

Vt.birdhunter
March 11, 2011, 03:54 PM
+1 for a battery backed alarm
+10 for a good dog

If you cant swing either, check this out at Home Depot for $40:

http://www.homedepot.com/buy/doors-windows/door-accessories/ryobi/tek4-4v-motion-sensing-alarm-94725.html

Battery powered motion detector

4runnerman
March 11, 2011, 04:00 PM
Gun by the bed and a 117 lb Ugly dog next to that.:D Can't fortifie the bedroom as i have 2 children in different rooms i need to think about too.

Stevie-Ray
March 11, 2011, 06:48 PM
... a house clear every time you come home seems a little excessive.To you maybe. But I've spent the last 55 years near Detroit.

Even if it is as when you left? Maybe an alarm? Only if it is as when I left. As I said, if it's obvious that someone has at least been in there, the police will clear it for me. No alarm yet, but there will be when we live there if not before. As I said in another thread, I'm shopping for a monitoring system now.

I'm sure the people that were killed in the case from the following quote thought there was nothing wrong, i.e. everything appeared normal. Otherwise, why the hell would they be going to bed so nonchalantly. And no, I knew nothing about the case before I read it here, but I feel better about clearing my house all the time since I've read it.
I saw an actual case on Hard Evidence where this couple arrived home at 2:00 AM and were going to bed when someone evidently stepped out of a closet that he or she had been hiding in and shot each 5 times, then left.

liberty -r- death
March 12, 2011, 11:11 PM
I'm a full time fire fighter. There is not a door that we can't pop in some way. I get paid good money to break into homes and get people out. :D Dogs do slow us down from time to time though.:eek:

Lock's are for honest people. They only really keep the would be criminal at bay.

Alarms with a monitoring contract are best for security. Plus they also monitor the place for fire. (I like that) Big dogs are a great for scaring burglars, even a nice dog will put the fear of God in a stranger. Plus you get good company out of it.