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View Full Version : .25-06 or .260...which is the better performer?


Grayson
March 4, 2011, 09:45 PM
Which is the better performer on light skinned animals (deer, antelope)? Which do you prefer for target shooting?

JerryM
March 4, 2011, 09:50 PM
I doubt you could tell the difference. Where you hit the game, and the bullet used would be the difference.
For deer and antelope I would choose the 25/06.

Regards,
Jerry

mikejonestkd
March 4, 2011, 10:00 PM
There's not a lick of difference for normal hunting ranges. Both are great cartridges. The .260 is not quite as common in factory hunting rifles as the .25-06, if that makes any difference to you. Factory ammo for the .260 might not be as easy to find in any corner store either.

Doyle
March 4, 2011, 10:20 PM
You can run a .260 in as little as a 16" barrel (I've got 1 in a 16" pistol and another in an 18 1/2" rifle). Yes, you loose a little velocity but it is still a very potent round and pleasant to shoot.

On the other hand, if you start shooting a 25-06 in anything less than a 22" barrel be prepared for a huge fireball and tons of muzzle blast.

ndking1126
March 4, 2011, 11:30 PM
In my experience, the .25-06 has more options for commercial ammo and it's also easier to find.

mdd
March 5, 2011, 12:07 AM
I don't have any experience w/ the 260 but my 25-06 is my go-to rifle. 25-06 is a great open country caliber & I load mine with 115 gr bullets. Seems to cut through the wind like nothing.

Abel
March 5, 2011, 12:32 AM
Which is the better performer on light skinned animals (deer, antelope)? Which do you prefer for target shooting?

The one that costs less.

StrongSideArmsInc
March 5, 2011, 12:36 AM
Depends on the rifle you want and the type of hunting you do. Both are superb long range, high BC bullets. The 260 will perform better in a shorter lighter gun, because it is a short action cartridge, the 06 is a long action, and you will need a longer barrel to get a complete burn of the powder. I personally like the 260. Lighter, shorter, less recoil, and less blast.

20thru45
March 5, 2011, 12:42 AM
You could have a little of both the 6.5-06. Forget about factory ammo with this wildcat but it will shoot flatter than the 260 and have more frontal area than the .25. Its funny how much importance rifle shooters can place on 7 thousands of an inch.

jwilson48
March 5, 2011, 12:47 AM
25-06 is easier to get ammo for, and they are both good so go with the 25-06.

T. O'Heir
March 5, 2011, 01:13 AM
You like Fords or Chevys? Neither is a target shooting cartridge. Either will drop any deer or antelope you can hit. Local availability of ammo/brass might be an issue too.

RyeDaddy
March 5, 2011, 09:11 AM
^^^^^

Correction, the 260 IS a target shooting cartridge. Its very popular in long range competition, especially tactical matches.

PawPaw
March 5, 2011, 09:44 AM
Its funny how much importance rifle shooters can place on 7 thousands of an inch.

Ain't that the truth?! Realistically, there's nothing to sneer at with either cartridge. One launches a 0.257, 115 grain bullet at ~3000 fps. The other launches a 0.264, 120 grain bullet at ~2900 fps.

I doubt that a deer, antelope, or any other target could tell the difference. In both cartridges, I've seen rifles that are amazingly accurate. They're each easily capable of holding MOA or better with a good rifle and ammo. One fits in a long action, one in a short action.

I'm a quarter-bore guy, so I'd probably go with the .25-06. YMMV.

P-990
March 5, 2011, 11:26 AM
Correction, the 260 IS a target shooting cartridge. Its very popular in long range competition, especially tactical matches.

+1. Sgt Sherri Gallagher used a Tubb 2k in .260 to win this year's NRA Highpower Championship out at Camp Perry, Ohio.

For field use, I think it'a a matter of flip a coin, unless you're buying factory ammo, in which case I believe the .25-06 has a slight edge. In a dedicated target rifle, I'd go .260 and never look back. The 6.5mm has a HUGE edge in target-grade bullet selection over the .257" caliber.

Longdayjake
March 5, 2011, 12:01 PM
I am a very proud .25-06 owner. I use it to hunt varmints at moderate to long range. It was my first rifle ever. I love it. However, now that I own more rifles than I can count in a minute or two I will have to say that the .260 is more versatile and I would prefer to take one hunting than a .25-06. I am sad to say it but those 6.5 bullets really are the bee's-knees.

fast-eddie
March 5, 2011, 05:09 PM
Ammo availability honestly depends on where you live, here in the Portland Oregon area .260 ammo is much easier to find. Either caliber is best for a reloader IMO, since ammo is usually close to $30 a box locally.

Shane Tuttle
March 5, 2011, 06:09 PM
Its funny how much importance rifle shooters can place on 7 thousands of an inch.

I think you're not looking at the big picture. Bullet design/shape, width, and weight in the smallest of changes has the potential to provide big differences in precision on target.

Either one will do just fine for hunting. If anything, I'd choose the .25-06 if you don't reload. There's greater availability of ammo for it depending on demographics.

For target, the .260Rem is what I would choose....

Fullboar
March 6, 2011, 01:05 AM
Unless you are a reloader or are looking to get into reloading I would stick with the 25-06. If you do reload then I would go the 260rem over the 25-06 without hesitation.
The 260 is a short action so your rifle will be shorter, lighter and faster and short actions are usually more accurate. There is a much bigger selection of hunting and target bullets with the 260rem and the 25-06 bullets range from around 75 to 120 grains where the 260rem range from around 75 to 160 grains. Also for some reason the 260 (6.5mm) bullets (weighting the same as the 25-06 bullets) have much better ballistic coefficientcy and sectional density so the farther you shoot (compared with the 25-06 with the same weight bullets) the 260rem will hit harder and penetrate more as well as shooting flatter and having less wind drift. Having the ability to go up to 160 grain bullet changes your Deer/Antelope rifle into an Elk/Bear rifle. The 25-06 and 260rem have about the same recoil but I would take a guess that the 25-06 is harder in barrels. If you go at any long-range shoot (F-Class, Bench Rest, Tactical, Practical) the 260rem would probably be the most used caliber. Don’t get me wrong the 25-06 is a great round just the 260rem is better (just ask anyone with a 260rem and they will tell you they love theres as well).

tkofoid
March 6, 2011, 08:10 AM
At one time I thought the only gun to own was the 25-06. Then I got into the 6.5X55 swede. What a round! Then, I got a .260! For me it's the cat's meow! Less powder,,less kick, very accurate. All these rounds are like beautiful women---I love-em all!

LSnSC
March 6, 2011, 08:29 PM
I have both. If you want a more compact rifle Id choose the .260. If you dont mind a standard length action and a 24" barrel I prefer the 25-06. With 115gr NBT's or 117 gr Sierras, it hits like a hammer.

GeauxTide
March 6, 2011, 09:28 PM
An important factor in choosing the 25 is barrel length - nothing less than 24". I agree with the others if you're using factory ammo. The only thing a 260 can do is push those 140gr pencils to 2750 (22" bbl.). With 120s the difference is .007 and 100-150 fps in favor of the 25.

Grayson
March 7, 2011, 08:12 PM
Are Howa, Tikka and Remington the only manufacturers that offer the .260 in a bolt action?

RyeDaddy
March 7, 2011, 09:07 PM
Grayson,

Savage offers a ton of bolt actions in .260 as of this year. All have a 1 in 8" twist too! Go to savagearms.com and look in their gun finder.

I have a model 16 in 260 I bought as soon as they came out. Only had it to the range once so far, but it's a keeper.

Shane Tuttle
March 7, 2011, 09:35 PM
I could be way off, but I swear CZ has rifles chambered in .260Rem....

GeauxTide
March 7, 2011, 09:43 PM
+1 Ryedaddy. I got a WWLH in 260 in October. Only rifle I've ever owned with a 2.5# trigger and the first reloads in .679" OOB! The first 6 rounds in 1.2"! Can't wait to shoot the recommended 140s.

lewwetzel
March 7, 2011, 09:49 PM
FWIW, if you want to spend @ least $1700, Cooper offers their new short-action Model 54 (Classic) repeater in .260 Rem. Should be a sweet combo.

Grim_Reaper
March 7, 2011, 09:52 PM
.260 by far.

20thru45
March 8, 2011, 03:58 AM
I think you're not looking at the big picture. Bullet design/shape, width, and weight in the smallest of changes has the potential to provide big differences in precision on target.

Shane, I think just like you and every one else here I obsess about every picture big, small and otherwise. That is why I'm here.

I've got a Rem 700 -06 that is destined to be re-barreled into a 25-06, .260 or a more likely a 6.5-06. Other possibilities exist for this project like a .270 or even 6.5 Swede.

Shane, please trust me I'll make as many considerations as I'm able while contemplating, ammo, bullets, velocity, SD, BC, bullet choices, dies, brass etc. I'll love every minute of it too.

Even better I might not start this project for months or years, so like an elk hunting trip I'll get to plan, bull@#$% etc. and then do it. Stories will then follow.

Today I'd pick 25-06 but I've got time. I hope:)

Joe D.

HiBC
March 8, 2011, 04:49 AM
My frame of reference is my .257 AI.Same bullets,same twist,I have backed off to only 3050 from my 22 in fwt bbl.with a 115 Ballistic tip.For the 20 years I have been shooting it,it puts a grin on my face.Sweet.Will whack deer and antelope fine.I have not used it on elk,I have larger rifles.I believe,if used with care and some restraint,it would work fine on elk.I might go Accubond or partition,and inside 200 yds or so.
Typical .257 bbls are not twisted tighter than 1 in 10,and typical .264 bbls are between 1 in 9 to 1 in 7.
That matters to the bullet mfgrs.You can get better deep penetration or extreme range and match bullets for a 6.5 mm bore.This may not mean quite so much if the .260 is limited by a 2.8 in mag box.Did you say you are converting an 06?I think your mag box and feeding would be easiest with the 30-06 family of cartridges,and,if you are a handloader,the 6.5-06 sure might solve the dilemna

Lloyd Smale
March 8, 2011, 06:50 AM
cant see what the 260 does that the 25-06 doesnt do better. Flatter shooting harder hitting, easier to find ammo for. A wider selection of ammo is available. Only advantage i can see to a 260 is if a guy wants a compact rifle. Its built on short actions and doesnt need the barrel lenght a 2506 needs to be efficient but truth be told even if a guy built a 20 inch 25-06 im sure it would be still faster then a 260 with the same weight bullet. A better comparison would be the 2506 compared to the 264 mag. In that case the 264 would defineately outperform the 25-06 but not by much if you compared a 120 grain bullet in both.

Fullboar
March 8, 2011, 07:32 AM
cant see what the 260 does that the 25-06 doesnt do better. Flatter shooting harder hitting, easier to find ammo for. A wider selection of ammo is available. Only advantage i can see to a 260 is if a guy wants a compact rifle. Its built on short actions and doesnt need the barrel lenght a 2506 needs to be efficient but truth be told even if a guy built a 20 inch 25-06 im sure it would be still faster then a 260 with the same weight bullet. A better comparison would be the 2506 compared to the 264 mag. In that case the 264 would defineately outperform the 25-06 but not by much if you compared a 120 grain bullet in both.

Please tell me what does the 25-06 do better? Due to the better BC/SD of the 260 it will perform better then the 25-06 (hit harder, faster and penetrate more) and does it more efficiently (less powder). It (the 25-06 may be a little faster at the muzzle but it sheds speed quicker then the 260. About the only thing the 25-06 has over the 260 is the large range of factory ammo but if you handload the 260 has more target and hunting bullets in more weights (ie: 25-06 bullets range from 75 to 120 grain, 260 bullets range from 75 to 160 grains) and like I said for the same bullet weights the 260 (6.5mm) has much better BC/SD. Also the 260 comes in a short action IMHO that is a bonus over the long action of a 25-06. I could go on for a while but it's all in my last post.

nate45
March 8, 2011, 07:38 AM
I like the 6.5-06 idea, sort of best of both worlds. Increased velocity and the great SD and BC of the .26 caliber projectiles. Have one and its great. 'Course don't go by me, I like them all, high and medium power rifle cartridges that is. :)

jgcoastie
March 8, 2011, 12:34 PM
I'm dreaming of a Model 70 re-barreled to 6.5/06.... Set up for long-range target use, I already have a Kimber 84M (M70 action) in .260 Rem, so the hunting gun side of the house is taken care of.

FWIW, I have a Browning A-Bolt Stainless Stalker in .25/06 Rem that I love. It is very accurate. Best factory ammo groups just under 1 MOA. Best handloads get me in the 1/3 MOA club. It's a great hunting gun for a wide array of game.

I also have a Kimber 84M Classic Select Grade in .260 Rem that I love even more. It is about 2lbs lighter and it handles like it's 12 inches shorter (in all actuality it's only about 5" shorter) than the A-Bolt. Best factory loads come in at about 3/4 MOA. I have not handloaded for this rifle yet.

My go-to gun used to be the A-Bolt, it is now the Kimber. It's lighter, handles better, and shoots well. It is the first M70-type action I've had, but it will not be the last.


If all else fails; flip a coin, you just about can't go wrong either way.

Lloyd Smale
March 8, 2011, 01:41 PM
fullbore i guess my comparison comes from the fact that everyone i know that is using a 260 for the most part uses 120s or 130s. How could a 26 cal bullet have a better sectional density then a .25? If you go up to 140s and especially 160s the 260 wont come close to the real life velcocitys a 2506 will. My #1 2506 will push 120s easily to 3100 fps. I have to doubt if your going to even get close to 3000 with them in a 260 and if you ran most 260 loads over a chrono youd find that 2800 is more realistic. Now if you go to a 140 your going to get better sectional density but your giving up at least another 100 fps and it would take a shot way out of the normal even long range shots on game to make up that 2-300 fps. What the 260 is good at is as a whitetail gun for 250-300 yard shooting at deer in a nice little compact 20 inch gun. If your going to haul around a full sized gun I still stand behind the statement that if far outperforms the 260. I kind of chuckle at guys that think theres something majic about 6.5 bullets. Ive got a 264 and a 7mag and ive shot enough game with both to know that they are indentical in performace at all ranges. Personaly if i wanted to shoot 140s in a light gun id step up to a 708 as it will push them faster then a 260 and you dont have to hunt around all day finding bullets to feed it.

taylorce1
March 8, 2011, 03:04 PM
Man you guys are getting picky here over MV and BC! You should all sit down take a deep breath and admit to yourselves the .270 Win is the obvious choice! :eek:

603Country
March 8, 2011, 06:05 PM
Taylorforce,

What you said was exactly what I was thinking. The 270 will do what the other two will do, and do it better. I will admit though, that I have a 260 and like it a lot. With a 120 grain bullet at 2900, it is almost as good as a 270. Key word here is 'almost'. And the 25-06, though a great round, is almost as good as the 270 also. But bottom line is that they are all 3 just fine for most anything any of us would want to do. Not really that much difference in the 3, except for personal preferences.

mdd
March 8, 2011, 06:31 PM
Personal preference, as 603 stated, is probably the biggest difference among the two initial calibers & the 270 isn't far out of this discussion either. As an example of personal preference, I just loaded 250 more rounds for my 25-06's. I have a 270 that I haven't even shot yet & don't feel as though I'm missing some life-altering experience by leaving it set. I'll get around to it eventually but for all the rifles I have, my 223 & 25-06 cover everything I want to do.

Doyle
March 8, 2011, 06:33 PM
You should all sit down take a deep breath and admit to yourselves the .270 Win is the obvious choice!

It isn't that a .270 Win isn't a great caliber. It's just that it won't do what I want it to do. My personal need is for a short, light, treestand gun that can still reach out to 300 yds accurately. Putting a .270 through a 18 1/2" barrel would kill the deer as much from muzzle flash as it would from the bullet. Plus, the recoil of a .270 from a 6 1/2lb rifle would be much more unpleasant.

My little .260 fits the bill perfectly for what I do.

publius
March 8, 2011, 08:19 PM
Lloyd, if you ever want to get rid of that .264 let me know. I do think they're magic.

IDAHO83501
March 8, 2011, 08:28 PM
25-06 hands down is the choice,,,a .270 would be even better.

Shane Tuttle
March 8, 2011, 09:14 PM
While .270Win is certainly a viable option for someone, the OP didn't ask for this choice. I will briefly state this, though regarding this cartridge, the .25-06, and the .260: For hunting purposes on game selected by the OP, any of them will provide the same result. So why choose a harder recoiling rifle? I wouldn't expect the average hunter to shoot more than 200-250 yards out so the trajectory isn't going to be substantially different between the three. The .260 is the only one that suffers factory ammo availability. Easiest recoiling, IMHO, goes to the .25-06 and that's the one I'd choose.

Now, if we're talking about target, the .270Win is just about the last cartridge I'd consider. If it's so great, then why is it I see absolutely NO rifles chambered in .270Win when going to shooting matches? We're talking about 600+ meters....

reloader-1
March 8, 2011, 11:17 PM
Shane, I'm pretty sure that the .260 would have less recoil.

www.handloads.com has a handy calculator:

http://www.handloads.com/calc/recoil.asp


The larger case, with more powder capacity pushing a smaller bullet faster = more recoil.

Lloyd Smale
March 9, 2011, 07:00 AM
publius i wouldnt sell it. I really like the gun and the 264 mag. Its got some nostalgia appeal that to me the 7mag doesnt but in the field there about identical. i dont care much for the 270. Its not that its not a good round in the field its just that every wanabe expert on rifles thinks if he has a 270 hes some kind of a rifleman. Also the 270 wasnt in the choises. As wasnt the 06 and 280 which would be my top choises for what hes doing. As to the recoil thing. Give me a break guys. If you can shoot a 260 in a compact gun your probably shooting a rifle that recoils more then most 2506s rifles made. Bottom line is like someone else said were splitting hairs here. All of the guns mentioned would do a good enough job on deer that it isnt worth arguing about. Its more of a matter of personaly preference then it is to performance and my choise for a light short barreled bolt gun would hands down be a 308. My little model 7 308 has shot at least 50 deer and some a bit past 300 yards and loaded with cup and core 150s its never let me down. It wouldnt even be a consideration for me to replace it with a 260 or 708.

taylorce1
March 9, 2011, 09:37 AM
I said the .270 comment to be kind of tongue in cheek. Too many people get wrapped around the axle when it comes to their favorite cartridges and rifles. Does the .25-06 do anything better than the .260 or vice versa? Sure they do, just not enough to make the results turn out any different when hunting thin skinned animals. You put the bullet in the proper place and I doubt you’ll be able to tell the difference in how the animal reacts between the two.

You can crunch the numbers all you want and it still boils down to the fact they are very similar in performance on the same types of big game. The .260 is a little better choice because of bullets for elk, but the .25-06 is a better choice for varmints for the same reason. There is a lot of overlap in these two cartridges in terms of performance and 100-200 fps isn't going to make any difference.

Here is a quote from another forum, this member’s signature line and it helps to put a lot of things in perspective for me at least especially when talking firearms online.

What I have learned on internet forums:
1. The proper answer to: Where is the best place to get a steak dinner? is…you really want pork chops.

2. Big game animals can tell the difference between .015 of an inch in diameter, 15 grains of bullet weight, and 150 fps.

3. The laws of physics do not apply to firearms in that there is a difference in the performance of two identical projectiles launched at the same velocity if they came from different cartridges and certain cartridges are so powerful that their kinetic energy can knock a big game animal off its feet but not knock the shooter who fired the cartridge off their feet.

4. While a double rifle is the perfect DGR, every 375HH bolt gun needs to be modified so it can carry at least 5 down.

5. While a floor plate and a detachable box magazine both use mechanical latches, only the floor plate latch is reliable regardless of the fact that almost every modern military rifle in the world uses a detachable box magazine including those chambered in 50 BMG.

6. The Remington 700 is unreliable regardless of the fact that it is the basis of the US Marine Corp M40 sniper rifle for over 40 years with no changes to the receiver or extractor and is the choice of more military sniper units and law enforcement agencies than any other rifle.

7. PF actions are not suitable for a DGR, and it is irrelevant that the M1, M14, M16, & AK47 which were designed for hunting game that can shoot back are all PF actions.

8. 95 deg F in Africa is different than 95 deg F in TX or CA and that is why you must worry about ammunition temperature in Africa (despite the fact most safaris take place in the winter) but not in TX or in CA.

9. It is not the size of the ding in the gun's finish that matters but whether or not the ding occurred in the safe or in the field because safe dings are okay but field dings are worse.

10. One (1) in a row is a trend, two (2) of anything is a statistically significant sample, and three (3) similar occurrences of anything is an irrefutable fact.

Lloyd Smale
March 9, 2011, 11:28 AM
i guess i base my post on the opinion i have the neither are guns id take elk hunting. What i use them for is deer. If elk was on the agenda id have at least an 06 and probably a mag of some kind. I kind of chuckle at guys that will tell you something like there 260 is just as powerful as a 2506 and then will argue a bit later that the 2506 is equal to the 270 and the 270 is equal to the 06 and the 06 is as good as a 300 mag. Pretty soon by looking at it youd have to say that a 243 is as good on elk as a 340 weatherby. Sorry guys but get over it. the 260 will never be a 2506 and wasnt designed to even compete with it. Its good at what it does just as a 2506 is but they both have there places. I know if im shooting at deer at 400 yards id grab a 2506 hands down over a 260. Now a fair comparison is it against the 7mauser or 708 or even the 243. To run with a 2506 in comparison in a 6.5 you need to step up to a 6.5-o6 Now thats a round with some real potential.

reloader-1
March 9, 2011, 01:32 PM
Lloyd,

Respectfully - the .260 and the 25-06 are nearly equivalent rounds. The smaller round (25-06) pushes smaller bullets slightly faster, while the larger round (.260) pushes bigger bullets slightly slower.

The difference is around 20 grains of bullet weight, 6 grains of powder, and 200 fps.

In other words, they are equivalent. The .260 does have a higher sectional density, and a better BC.

jgcoastie
March 9, 2011, 04:02 PM
...My personal need is for a short, light, treestand gun that can still reach out to 300 yds accurately. ...My little .260 fits the bill perfectly for what I do.

The Rem Model 7 and Kimber 84M also perfectly fit the bill for most spot & stalk hunting and brush hunting. Light, short, easily maneuverable, and accurate for reasonable hunting ranges.

Just about the perfect all-around hunting rifle & cartridge.

Longdayjake
March 9, 2011, 05:45 PM
cant see what the 260 does that the 25-06 doesnt do better.

Lloyd, I have the utmost respect for you so don't take this the wrong way. I love the .25-06 but it is not as versatile as the .260. I know you may not believe in the 6.5 bullets, but I sure do. Velocity is great and it can get you a long way, but if it is coupled with low bc bullets it will literally only take you so far. If you are wanting to shoot accurate at longer distances you need the wind-resistant high-BC bullets. If you never shoot at distance you can't really know how important wind resistance is. Just because a round can reach way out there because it starts out going really fast does not mean it will be as close to the target as a slower bullet with really high BC. I hunt chucks at longer ranges whenever I get a chance. I have learned how important wind drift is when it comes to trying to hit small targets at 300-400+ yards. Heck, even at 200 yards a bullet can be blown off course and turn a hit into a miss. However, for deer I believe that either caliber will get the job done at pretty much any range that is ethical for either caliber. Also, powder efficiency and bullet selection tip the scale even further toward the .260. In short, I really do think the 6.5 bullets are magical.

reloader-1
March 9, 2011, 06:33 PM
Longday,

Thanks for summarizing the .260's advantages so succinctly - one of the other benefits is that it is a short action cartridge, so your rifle is accordingly lighter and handier, while maintaining the same barrel length.

The 25-06 is a great cartridge, but the .260 ranks up there as one of the most efficient cartridges period.

I really do think that factory ammo selection is getting better and better for the .260 - I see it taking off and being more popular than 7mm-08 by 2018, and should be easily found in all major sporting stores in the next 4-10 years.

Fullboar
March 9, 2011, 11:55 PM
fullbore i guess my comparison comes from the fact that everyone i know that is using a 260 for the most part uses 120s or 130s. How could a 26 cal bullet have a better sectional density then a .25? If you go up to 140s and especially 160s the 260 wont come close to the real life velcocitys a 2506 will. My #1 2506 will push 120s easily to 3100 fps. I have to doubt if your going to even get close to 3000 with them in a 260 and if you ran most 260 loads over a chrono youd find that 2800 is more realistic. Now if you go to a 140 your going to get better sectional density but your giving up at least another 100 fps and it would take a shot way out of the normal even long range shots on game to make up that 2-300 fps. What the 260 is good at is as a whitetail gun for 250-300 yard shooting at deer in a nice little compact 20 inch gun. If your going to haul around a full sized gun I still stand behind the statement that if far outperforms the 260. I kind of chuckle at guys that think theres something majic about 6.5 bullets. Ive got a 264 and a 7mag and ive shot enough game with both to know that they are indentical in performace at all ranges. Personaly if i wanted to shoot 140s in a light gun id step up to a 708 as it will push them faster then a 260 and you dont have to hunt around all day finding bullets to feed it.

If you don't, can't or won't reload then handsdown the 25-06 wins and the 25-06 has a much larger choice of factory rifles, but as I said I (me) think that the 260 has a number of advantages even though they are small IMHO there is a number of them that I think would sway the decision of someone wanting a rifle around the size of a 25-06 or 260rem.

1. Short Action so the rifle (same brand/model) will be shorter, lighter and faster.
2. Greater choice of bullets weights with the choice of going up to 160 grain bullets (40 grains over the 25-06) making it (the 260) more versatile.
3. More Hunting and Target bullets ect.
4.Much better sectional density and ballistic coefficient bullets.

I can reload the 123 grain Lapua Scenar at around 2970fps without any pressure signs and the 25-06 you will get around 100fps more but the 260 have much better s/d-b/c so theres really not much in it (I mostly use bullets around 140 grains for hunting and target). According to the recoil calulator the 260 and 25-06 are pretty darn close with the 260 just a little tiny bit better with the same weight bullets-rifles so again there's not much in it. IMHO the 260 makes a great long range hunting and target rifle. I know I must sound like a fanboy and although I love the 260 and talk it up as much as possible I still use a 308 a hell of a lot.

lefteyedom
March 10, 2011, 01:16 AM
I have pondered this same question 25/06 versus 260, 7-08 or 308. So what a guy to do? build two rifles. a 25/06 with a 24" barrel and 7-08 with a 20" barrel.

If I could have only one rifle it would be a 260, it would be a great a compromise.

Compromise while good in a marriage, not so good with firearms..,

(for the record I am DIVORCED)

Lloyd Smale
March 10, 2011, 05:31 AM
I guess like i said i look at it a bit differnt. I have enough rifles in differnt calibers that i dont really look alot at a one size fits all gun. If i did have to go to one gun it would no doubt be an 06 as nothings more versitile. We do alot of crop damage deer shooting and it gives a guy alot of chances to compare performance of differnt rounds and loads. We hunt many differnt fields and what i do is look at the field and how long the shots are. I kind of lump guns into two groups. If shooting will be under 300 yards i take along a 308, 06, 280 257 roberts ect. Now to me the 260 fits in there well. When i know shots will run out to 400 and maybe a bit farther i take a 257 wby, 264mag 7mag or 300 mag of some sort and the only nonmag that fits in this group is my 2506. These choises arent based on paper ballistics or a math formula, there based on watching the acutal field performance of these rounds. Now i wont argue that some of the standard rounds wont get it done or even that some of the mags are overkill but doing crop damage shooting our first consern is putting the animal down where its shot. A little meat damage is preferable to having the animal run out into the crop where we are destroying the farmers crops to recover it or chasing around half the night finding a deer that ran off wounded. I have killed exactly zero deer with the 260. So mayby i should really coment on it but have killed many with the 257 roberts 708 243 ect and they just dont dump deer like the 2506 even at 200 yards and surely not a 400. Im sure you can come up with some math numbers that make me look silly in my opinion but ill go back to my real life experinces everytime. Now change this to regular deer season and youll seldom see me carrying a gun from the second group. 9 times out of 10 if im not hunting with a handgun its a rifle from the first group and in a handly small package. My two favorite rounds for that are probably the 250 sav and 257 roberts and i cant leave out the good old 308.

reloader-1
March 10, 2011, 09:02 AM
Lloyd, thanks for your response.

As you stated, you have never killed a deer with a .260 - and it is a completely different cartridge than the .243, 7mm-08, 257 Roberts, etc.

Try it - I think you will be VERY surprised.

jgcoastie
March 10, 2011, 12:19 PM
I killed quite a few deer(4) and hogs(24) with my .260 this year... All were DRT shots, except one hog that ran about 10 feet. Ranges from 20-350yds.

I was shooting 140gr Sierra Game King bullets, factory loaded from Federal. After a little bit, I ran out of the Federal's (only had one partial box after sight-in). So I found a couple boxes of Remington 140gr PSP Managed-Recoil ammo (all I could get a hold of without driving for an hour). It performed extremely well also.

For those contemplating buying a .260 Rem as a well-rounded hunting gun, do it. You will not be disappointed.

Doyle
March 10, 2011, 12:30 PM
Remington 140gr PSP Managed-Recoil ammo

That's one of those marketing decisions that make you go "Hmmm?". The .260 is a soft-recoiling round already. Whey do they think they need to offer an even softer recoiling verson?

Longdayjake
March 10, 2011, 05:25 PM
That's one of those marketing decisions that make you go "Hmmm?". The .260 is a soft-recoiling round already. Whey do they think they need to offer an even softer recoiling verson?

My wife loves to shoot guns but doesn't have much fun when they scare her. The less they kick the more she smiles. So, though the .260 doesn't kick much already, it would probably make my wife happy to have it kick even less.

BIGR
March 10, 2011, 07:13 PM
.260 might just be my next hunting caliber. I have been thinking about a NULA in that caliber. I don't have anything under the 7mm-08 other than the 22-250 and rimfire .22's. I am trying to look towards the future when I get really old and can't tote those 8+ pound rifles through the mountains with ease. :)

I know a deer hunter that uses the .260 in a T/C encore for deer and he loves that caliber.

reloader-1
March 10, 2011, 08:19 PM
Every week that goes by, I hear of someone else buying or thinking of buying a .260 - this cartridge is definitely on the rise in popularity.

dsnyder
March 15, 2011, 09:13 PM
I love the 260. I have another thread or two on the 260 in here somewhere. I just shot a .271, 4 shot gorup of 140 gr hornady interlocks @ 2800 fps from a model seven.
Reloading is a big consideration though. I can normally find a box or two of anything somewhere around town. I'd have to think that the 25-06 might be easier to track down though. I'd also bet that factory loads in 25-06 are closer to optimum performance than factory 260 loads are.

reloader-1
March 15, 2011, 11:00 PM
dsnyder,

I wouldn't be so sure about optimum performance (relative to the cartridge's capabilities) - the .260 was only introduced in the mid 1990's, so any rifles chambered for it would be capable of handling modern pressures.

In fact, the .260 is recommended as an alternative to the 6.5x55mm as many factory loads for the 6.5 are underpowered here in the US, while the .260 doesn't have that problem.

doceaux
March 18, 2011, 11:50 PM
dsnyder what powder and load you using wit the 140 interlocks?

Lloyd Smale
March 19, 2011, 08:09 AM
ok ill post a few numbers and you tell me where the majic is in the 6.5s. These are all off of the sierra sight. Im sure if you changed bullets things may change a bit but if you used the same brand accross the board like i did youd come up with about the same thing.
117 .257 bt .410 bc
120 .264 bt .356 bc
140 7mm bt 416 bc
140 6.5 bt 495 bc
Now first ill compare your 260 to the 257 roberts with 120s the roberts is capable of at least a 100fps more with a bullet that has a better bc. winner roberts.
25-06vs260 120s not even close
now the 260 vs 708 with 140s. the 260 has a slight edge in bc. The 708 has a very small advantage in bullet diameter and probably a 100 fps more velocity. Results toss up until ranges get so long that your out of the ballpark for either caliber.
I just dont see how a 2506 shooting a bullet with a better bc at 200fps faster could possibly be beat out by the 260. Go with the 140 and loose a couple hundred fps but gain the bc and you probably will shoot just as flat as the 120 load but still cant compete with something like a 2506 or 270. Just as the 2506 and 270 cant compete with the 7mag.
I kind of get a charge out of people. One guy will say his 708 is as good as a 280 the next will say why buy a 7mag when his 280 will do the same and the next will say why a 7 ultra mag when his 7mag will do the same. If you looked at that mentality the 708 should do the same thing a 7 ultra mag does. It aint happening. Nothing wrong with the 260 but its not a 25-06 and it isnt even fair to compare it. If you want a fair comparison that will make the 264s look good compare it to a 6.5-06
Say what you want but sticking a 6.5 bullet in a 708 case doesnt make it some kind of majic killing machine.

jgcoastie
March 19, 2011, 09:43 AM
There's nothing magic about it... The .260 Rem is just a very efficient cartridge that is soft-shooting and is well-suited for lightweight hunting rifles that handle very well. My Kimber 84M Select, for example.

There ain't a deer out there that will live because it was shot (given equal shot placement) with a .260 Rem instead of a .25/06 Rem, .30/06 Spfd, 7mm Rem Mag, 7mm-08 Rem, .270 Win, the list goes on... The opposite is also true.

Most everyone who doesn't like the 6.5mm's probably hasn't used one hunting. Those that have will likely never change. It's all a matter of preferance... I prefer the .260 Rem for it's long, pencil-style bullets that outperform their heavier .308" counterparts in SD and penetration (given equal parent casings). I also like the fact that the rifle I use weighs in at around 6.5-6.8 lbs.

Lloyd Smale
March 19, 2011, 03:40 PM
by the way im an ex coastie myself. 74-78

TGReaper
March 19, 2011, 10:52 PM
Myself ,I would go with the 25-06,I have a Tikka chambered for it. Excellent cartridge.( I have a soft spot for the 06 case.)
And if I want to shoot a 6.5 mm I will use my .264 WM.
TGR

sc928porsche
March 19, 2011, 11:22 PM
I have both and have used both in hunting and range situations. The 25-06 seems to be just a bit flatter so for hunting purposes where the shots are taken from 60 to 300 yards (no range finder etc.) I find that I prefer the 25-06 over the 260. Usually my 25-06 is used for varmits and antelope. Most of the time my deer and elk are hunted with 300WM. Actually the 260 I have and the one my daughter has are 6.5-08. They were made before the 260 was released.

End result however is to use whichever you prefer.