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ousooner81
March 4, 2011, 04:43 PM
I want to thank all of you on this board for educating those of us who have been ignorant to guns and home protection. I decided to research home protection since sometimes I work nights and leave the family alone. The wife and I are heading to the nearest gun range this weekend to let her shoot a glock, 38 special, or whatever else she wants to shoot!

All that said, from reading this board it has kind of startled me. It seems your in deep trouble if a BG is invading due to being groggy (if asleep) or there are multiple BGs. The overall consensus seems to be to barricade yourself in your room and wait for the cops. That's not an option for me. I'm not leaving my kids in their rooms to hope for the best. I'm going out firing with my wife behind me! I have an awesome dog that has a history of scaring off potential intruders but I don't have the alarm. I rent a house so I'm not installing one. Is there a cheaper option for home alertness (a way to be alerted if a door is opened or window)? Thanks again all!

markj
March 4, 2011, 05:13 PM
The overall consensus

No, I have a plan. I have motion sensor lites outside the house, dogs inside that bark. A floor plan that is set up for HD. Make it almost impossible for anyone to just kick in the door and get the jump on you.

Yankee Doodle
March 4, 2011, 05:19 PM
The pup, if he is of that nature, will let you know if there is anyone trying to get in.
First, dial 911 and put the phone on the floor. You don't have to say a word. The call is automatically traced. They WILL come.
Then, keep up a loud commentary as to what is going on, so the Police dispatcher on the other end can advise the responding cars.
In a LOUD, CLEAR voice, announce that you are armed. You really want the cops to know this. If you leave your room, say so in a loud clear voice, and describe what you are wearing. You really want the cops to know this.
Leave your wife with the phone, so she can advise them what is going on once you have left the room.
DO NOT attempt to search the house. Go to your kids room and stay with them. Let the skells come to you.
When the Cops show up, and they will, they are going to be ready for trouble.
Do not meet them at the door with a drawn gun.
Other than these fairly simple procedures, there is not too much you can do without installing a good alarm system.
There are do-it-yourself systems on the market, but I don't know enough about them to have an opinion.
Hope this helps.

Skadoosh
March 4, 2011, 05:26 PM
Yankee Doodle has given EXCELLENT advice.

ousooner81
March 4, 2011, 05:33 PM
YD, thank you for the great advice! My natural inclination is to search for the bastards in my home. But logically that is not the best decision.

mayosligo
March 4, 2011, 05:44 PM
Yankee, thanks I liked the advice and it was a good refresher. I had everything but the "describe what you are wearing", so now I know that.

kraigwy
March 4, 2011, 06:03 PM
Keep it loaded, handy, and make sure your other half knows which one is loaded.

I'll mention a semi-possible home invasion story that got me in trouble, that happened in 1972.

We all know, (including my wife) that a cow moose is one of the most dangerous animals in North America.

Back in the spring of '72 I had just moved to Alaska and was working on the railroad, living in 3 miles north of Healy. We, (myself, wife, and two toddlers) were living in a tent while I was building a cabin.

It was about time for me to get off work, about 11 at night. Wife was setting by the fire and our two small toddlers were sleeping in the tent when a cow moose came through camp, and desided to hang around a while. Wife, knowing the critter had in mind to stomp the tent and her babies. She grabs a rifle to protect her kids.

About that time I came home (riding a motor cycle), the sound of the bike scared the moose away. I found her setting there with a rifle laying across her lap. She tells me the story, and I tell her, "next time, pick a rifle thats loaded", She checked and sure enough it wasn't. (probably the only one that was unloaded).

I went to bed without dinner that night.

Moral of the story, home invasions, animal or man, come fast, have the gun available, within reach and LOADED.

I learned later, as a cop in Anchorage, that response times for cops, even under the best of conditions could take 10-15 minutes. It takes a few seconds for one to kick through a door and do his evil deeds.

glockcompact
March 4, 2011, 06:15 PM
Also make sure your wife is comfortable with a gun. If she's scared and goes to get the gun, and the gun also makes her nervous then she needs more training. Picking up a pistol should never make you nervous. Respect what it can do but don't be afraid of it. Excellent advice from the above posts too. I always learn things on this board.

Jake Balam
March 4, 2011, 06:23 PM
I have a heavy steel screen door (think steel bars) that is usually propped open, the other night it slammed shut in a wind storm at about 2 am. It sounded exactly like I would imagine someone kicking my door in.

I was sleeping. Within three seconds of the door slamming I was cocked and locked in my kitchen wearing nothing but my tight whites, Taurus in hand.

My wife said she didnt know I moved that fast.

Wrangler
March 4, 2011, 07:05 PM
Jake, Why do you have your screen door propped open, especially at night?? If it works, use it. If it's broken, you need to fix it. A screen door is good for buying extra time and giving a little bit more deterrence against burglars and other people that want in your house. An open screen does none of that, and would probably attract people who are looking for a home that's easy to break into.

Don P
March 4, 2011, 08:17 PM
nothing but my tight whites,
What no speedo or better yet the old B'DAY suit:eek:
Couldn't resist

Dwight55
March 4, 2011, 10:01 PM
ousooner, . . . I don't know for sure if they are still sold, . . . but most boat dealers used to carry a VERY LOUD air powered little plastic horn. Push the button on the can, . . . noise comes out the end of that little red horn that you would not believe.

These can be rigged very easily to go off when a door is opened against them, . . . and if you live next door to a grave yard, . . . don't be surprized if some of the inhabitants over there let you know to keep the noise down.

Seriously, they are not that expensive, . . . will alert the whole house, . . . and if the bg is not devil bent on doing you in, . . . he won't stick around very long.

May God bless,
Dwight

oldcspsarge
March 4, 2011, 10:27 PM
911 is Government sponsored DIAL-A-Prayer....in the best of cases, it will be 7 minutes from when you dial 911 until the PD/SO arrives.....they will take a report and document what happened.....in 98% of cases..it will all be over.

When seconds count...the police are just minutes away.

Take responsibility for take safety of your family.....anyone hearing a pump shotgun cycled instantly knows ....they are in the wrong place !

Be prepared to defend yourself and your family......your property..better check what the laws are in your State.

Have a plan !

Jake Balam
March 4, 2011, 10:29 PM
It's winter, we keep it propped open.

Also my house is not a very good Target. I have several highly disable security cameras, and my front door is second story and visible from three blocks in Amy direction.

EricReynolds
March 4, 2011, 10:55 PM
Another +1 to YankeeDoodle. That's in a nutshell exactly what I would do. I'm a highly trained security professional and ex Army Ranger and even I never would have thought to relay to 911 what I was wearing. Although, I would hope the police would realize the guy in his PJs lives here.

T. O'Heir
March 4, 2011, 10:56 PM
"...have an awesome dog..." Nothing scares a criminal like a dog.
Most 'home invasions' start with a knock on the door, not somebody kicking the door in. Fido is always ready. You and a firearm may not be.
"...do-it-yourself systems..." A DIY alarm system only tells you something is happening. They don't alert the constabulary.

sirsloop
March 4, 2011, 11:27 PM
If you consider your response time to be to the point where you may be caught with someone inside your house without you aware, then you need to take a step back and consider border security. Get an alarm, fortify/strengthen your entryways, and realize that YOU AND YOUR FAMILY will be the weakest link. You must remain vigilant at locking doors, arming the security system, poke an eye out the window if you notice activity, etc. I have a nightly ritual of making rounds around the house. I ensure all doors are locked, lights off, no activity in the street, nothing wrong in the house. If you have a sliding glass door, put a bar on it. Ya know if you forget to lock a door it makes it damn easy for someone to sneak in. If you have solid doors and the sucker is handle locked with a deadbolt and solid chain its gonna make one hell of a bang trying to knock that sucker in. Also look around your yard for possible entry points. Do you leave ladders outside that could be used to gain access to the 2nd floor. Is it possible for someone to get up to a window that you would not think to lock? Walk around your property, think like a crook, and "try to break in". If it cannot be accomplished without setting off the alarm, breaking something, or making an absurd amount of noise you are probably quite safe. The BG will just try the next house until they find a 1st floor window open, a hand locked door they can card into, or a puny lock on a sliding door they can overpower. I wouldn't call myself paranoid. I would prefer someone to opt for the next house cause its not motion lit up light a Christmas tree, its not locked and fortified, it doesn't have a big dog inside, and it doesn't have a crown vic ex-police cruise with an NRA hat on the rear shelf.

Good info about the knock at the door. I have loaded firearms located in key points in my house, pretty much in the best defensive position as far from the main entry point as possible. If for some reason there is an event at my door, I can simply flee to the other side of the house, quickly grab the loaded and ready firearm, and make it happen. That's obviously not always going to work, but IMHO its a pretty solid plan regardless of where I may be in my house. Upstairs, downstairs, garage, driveway... always a path for me to retreat and obtain a loaded weapon. Not much you can do if someone knocks on the door and stuffs a pistol in your face. Get a peep sight and use it I guess...

Yankee Doodle
March 5, 2011, 07:28 AM
Having spent most of my adult life as a cop, let me tell you what is going through the mind of the cops responding to your call.
First, and foremost, he/she wants to be able to go home after his/her shift.
Anything you can do to help him/her do this, will make their job easier, and you safer.
The more information you provide, the better for you and for them.
Our dispatcher were trained to ask every complainant on this type of call the following questions
What is your sex?
What is your race?
How tall are you?
Long or short hair?
What are you wearing?
Where in the home are you?
Are there other family members in the home?
Where are they
Are you armed?
(if so) What are you armed with?
This way, the call goes out to the cars something like this.
"Complainent is a white male, approx 6' tall, short brown hair wearing white underwear.
Be advised that he is armed with a Colt, blue steel, .357 magnum revolver. He is now in the bedroom at the top of the stairs on the right, with his two children.
His wife is in the bedroom on the left, armed with a 12 gauge shotgun. Advise station before entry, and we will advise complainants to place their weapons on the floor, and meet you when you get to the bedroom doors."
OK, the responding officers now have all the information they need to insure that you don't get taken for the intruder. Safer for them, much safer for you.
I have responded to quite a few of these calls over the years, and having this info has mede the job a lot easier. More important, it has made the armed homeowner a lot safer. The safety of the public is the only reason cops get paid in the first place.
As an aside, you may not hear the cops arrive. When responding to this type of call, they will have turned off the top lights and siren far enough away so that the perp will not hear them coming. It's a safety thing.
Sorry if I dragged this out too long.

Double Naught Spy
March 5, 2011, 08:15 AM
That's not an option for me. I'm not leaving my kids in their rooms to hope for the best. I'm going out firing with my wife behind me! I have an awesome dog that has a history of scaring off potential intruders but I don't have the alarm. I rent a house so I'm not installing one. Is there a cheaper option for home alertness (a way to be alerted if a door is opened or window)? Thanks again all!

While I agree that the "consensus" of barricading in place doesn't make much sense if that means sacrificing the kids, "going out firing with your wife behind you" is just downright moronic. When you leave your bedroom with guns blazing, where are your kids? Obviously, you don't really know. You know where they were when you went to bed, maybe, but you don't know where they are sometime later because you have been asleep in your bedroom.

but I don't have the alarm. I rent a house so I'm not installing one.

This statement says volumes and it says a lot of what many of us have to deal with. It says that the security of you and your loved ones isn't worth any extra expense, particularly if at the the end of a given period of time you don't get to keep it. You would rather keep your family less well protected than to leave an alarm for the property owner to have, and so you don't perceive an alarm system as being cost effective for your family.

You know, lots of things aren't terribly cost effective that we do for self defense like maintaining proficiency with guns. That really is just the nature of the problem. So what you might want to do is to try to decrease your cost such that an alarm system might be more cost effective. Talk to your landlord. See if you can offset part of your rent with an alarm upgrade to the house. You might not get all your costs offset, but things might turn out better than you think. Many landlords are willing to swap physical improvements for rent. Check and see.

I have a heavy steel screen door (think steel bars) that is usually propped open, the other night it slammed shut in a wind storm at about 2 am. It sounded exactly like I would imagine someone kicking my door in.

It's winter, we keep it propped open.

Also my house is not a very good Target. I have several highly disable security cameras, and my front door is second story and visible from three blocks in Amy direction.

One thing that I have noticed is that folks who feel the safest are often the ones that cry the most about feeling violated when the mental bubble of security bursts. Just because you don't think your home is a good target doesn't mean some group of crackheads have the same opinion. If you have all those "disable security cameras" then you obviously got lots of stuff of value inside. Why else would you have the cameras?

Bartholomew Roberts
March 5, 2011, 10:11 AM
Many people will not do it because they consider it extreme, but carrying a handgun on your person serves several needs you have:

1. You have children and are concerned about their access to firearms. Keeping the firearm on you means you know where it is at all times and have positive control over access to it.

2. You appear to be concerned about having time to access a firearm - having one on you reduces the time to access it dramatically.

So in terms of two of the major concerns you've shared with us, a handgun on your person (assuming you are willing to put in the effort to learn to safely carry) is one of the best responses for both concerns.

Buzzcook
March 5, 2011, 12:00 PM
There are alarms which you can uninstall and take with you.
http://www.google.com/products/catalog?hl=en&sugexp=ldymls&pq=security+alarms+for+doors&xhr=t&q=security+alarms+for+doors&cp=15&safe=off&client=firefox-a&hs=3xa&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&bav=on.2,or.&um=1&ie=UTF-8&cid=17015179286951083299&sa=X&ei=cWtyTe3iIom-sAP9k_XICw&sqi=2&ved=0CDYQ8wIwAQ#

A door bars that make it much more difficult to kick a door in.
http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=door+bars&hl=en&um=1&ie=UTF-8&cid=11010687530082212846&sa=X&ei=tmtyTZWuFZScsQOroKXGCw&ved=0CLMBEPMCMAI#

I can understand not wanting to make a rental cosmetically better. Security is different though.

Jake Balam
March 5, 2011, 12:06 PM
Sorry,

I meant visable security cameras, I was typing it on my phone.

I live on top of a small store, in a very high traffic (for our little town) area.

And while I said my house isn't a very GOOD target, I know its still a target, and thats why I am prepared.

My house was built buy a man that made even us look paranoid.

Tempered glass on the front door, three point hinge, three dead bolts (one going up, one down, and one normal)

I have two security monitors in my bedroom (non functional anymore) and intercoms between each room.

One entrance (unless you want to use a ladder, along one of the main roads in town, very high police presence) and I can see the front door from where I lay in my bedroom.

In the event of a break in, I know where my kids will be, one will be confined to her crib (one years old)

And the other will be asleep due to some very very heavy medication he takes for his autism that puts him out like a light at night.

When things go bump in the middle of the night, I have the option of grabbing the .45 on the nightstand, or the remington 870 in the corner by the door.

I don't live in a fairy tale. I know bad things can happen at any time. That's why I always carry, even while Im home, and have the shotgun loaded up next to the exit to my bedroom.

But that doesn't change the fact, my house is NOT a very good target.

Constantine
March 5, 2011, 12:22 PM
Lol Jake that's funny..if a member of my family read this online right now. They'd think I'm on a forum under the name Jake Balam. (minus the location and home)

Powderman
March 5, 2011, 12:48 PM
Lots of good stuff in this thread, and Yankee Doodle has it right on the money.

One thing you must prepare for, however is actually two fold...What happens when that bump in the night actually turns out to BE a bad guy? What happens when you actualy have to use whatever you have in your hand with lethal intent?

I guarantee you one thing--you might well be unprepared for the flood of emotions and physiological responses and stimuli that goes through your body. It is quite unlike anything you have EVER experienced, and it can be unnerving.

There is one thing that can minimize--although not eliminate--these responses, and that is PRACTICE. I don't just mean going to the range. Split your preparation into three phases...

1. Get to a range that will let you shoot graphically correct targets--the "picture" targets. Use that for a while.

2. Get yourself into good physical condition. The better you are, the better your body will be to handle the "dump" of internal stimulants into your system. It also helps you to handle the aftermath. Ever had an "adrenaline" headache--where your body starts burning through all the stuff dumped into your system when a REAL threat is perceived?

3. Get the following book: "In The Gravest Extreme" by Massad Ayoob. CPT Ayoob does something unique with this book...he takes you through the shoot, and into the aftermath of the shooting. Read and study.

Finally, pray that you NEVER have to deploy a firearm with lethal intent. It is something you do NOT want to go through.

ousooner81
March 5, 2011, 03:03 PM
Double naught spy said "While I agree that the "consensus" of barricading in place doesn't make much sense if that means sacrificing the kids, "going out firing with your wife behind you" is just downright moronic. When you leave your bedroom with guns blazing, where are your kids? Obviously, you don't really know. You know where they were when you went to bed, maybe, but you don't know where they are sometime later because you have been asleep in your bedroom."

Obliviously I didn't literally mean running out of my room and just shooting, haha! That is downright moronic, I was assuming we all had some sort of commonsense! And yes, I do know where my kids are seeing they are not old enough to leave their rooms. But in case of the worst case, that a BG has snatched one of them then this is where the commonsense comes in, knowing my target!

Double naught spy said "This statement says volumes and it says a lot of what many of us have to deal with. It says that the security of you and your loved ones isn't worth any extra expense, particularly if at the the end of a given period of time you don't get to keep it. You would rather keep your family less well protected than to leave an alarm for the property owner to have, and so you don't perceive an alarm system as being cost effective for your family."

Not sure what you mean, what do you have to deal with? I think it's moronic of you to assume that my family's safety is not worth the expense. Maybe it is but we just can't afford to install an alarm system. We are a one income household that has to live on a budget and an alarm system for a rent house is not a expense I can afford, nor is it an investment seeing we'll be out of the place in the next 6 months. Like many have stated before, we are looking for some secondary options (air horn, etc).

ousooner81
March 5, 2011, 03:08 PM
Thank you Buzzcook for the links! Very helpful and conducive to the topic!

Glenn E. Meyer
March 6, 2011, 10:48 AM
I think from the gun a-blazing interchange, we have a teachable moment of not spouting cliches for posturing purposes but discuss things in rational and precise terms.

Also, as mentioned - you can go to Home Depot or the like and get easily mounted alarms for doors and windows.

Run some emergency drills with the wife and and kids as you can't expect just telling them what to do once or twice will stick in an emergency.

While money may be a problem, my preachy advice is that if you are deadly serious about having the adults being a shooter in an emergency, you need more than the square range hole punching experience.

sonick808
March 6, 2011, 04:50 PM
some gems in here. telling 911 what you're wearing is a total gem.

I think i'm going to start sleeping in my lime green commodore 64 shirt since that is such an atypical color

as for the response time at my place, it'd be very difficult to get the jump on me. I've got a HD-centric furniture layout and the entry basically funnels any intruders into a single file line.

Powderman
March 6, 2011, 06:40 PM
some gems in here. telling 911 what you're wearing is a total gem.


OK. Think that's overboard?

Here's the situation...

Say I'm responding to a residential burg call, or an intruder call. I arrive and wait for at least one more officer to go in with me. I'll make sure a perimeter is set, and then we enter the house. ANY movement outlines a potential target--and yes, we practice this constantly. We are NOT going to kick in the door, unless an emergency exists.

So, dispatch has the homeowner on the line who whispers--"There's someone in the house" and that's it. Let's say that the information includes the fact that the intruder has a gun.

Like I said, we practice--and we can be VERY quiet inside a home. So, we round a corner--and all we see is someone there with a gun in his or her hand--with no other information. Guess what? You'd better be dropping that gun REAL fast, BEFORE we see you. And, you'd better be trying your best to touch the ceiling with both hands and acting like a statue. Anything else can get you shot. Multiple times.

Now, suppose that we have additional information like "The caller states that their (fill in the blank here) has the top floor secured, and is guarding the stairs up to the top floor with a firearm. The person is wearing (fill in the blank), and their name is (fill in the blank). Much better.

We will then clear the rest of the home, including the basement as applicable. We will then call out to you...

"To the people upstairs; this is the police. Are you OK?" If you reply "Yes", we'll ask for names. Hopefully the dispatcher is still on the phone; we'll probably give dispatch a code word to tell to you and ONLY you, and we'll ask for the code word to tell us you're OK.

Identifying yourself is a REALLY good thing. Trust me on that.

threegun
March 6, 2011, 07:26 PM
I think its best to prevent any such invasion to start with. Lights, removing high shrubbery, bars on all openings, and perhaps a large dog are all preventatives. Alarm systems also deter plus they allow you to monitor windows and doors from the key pad and will wake you to an intruder instantly.

My house I thought was pretty secure as it had bars on all the windows plus the sliding glass doors. My front and rear doors were solid and dead bolted giving me a false sense of security. One day my alarm company call me while I'm at work to say my alarm is going off. I called off police since my parents live nearby and could go check for me (false alarms are 75 bucks each these days). Plus it was noon or broad daylight. My father found my door had been kicked in. My neighbor confirmed that he heard only one bang noise meaning my door opened instantly. The solid door was only as strong as the door frame which exploded violently allowing the door to swing open. Thankfully my alarm scared off the burglar before he could clean me out.

This speed of entry did make me think however. If my main line of defense, the door, could be defeated with a single kick, then I could never truly be secure or prepared in my home unless I had a weapon in my hands at all times.

My solution was to purchase and install bars for both front and back doors. Several hundred dollars for true peace of mind was a bargain.

Double Naught Spy
March 6, 2011, 07:33 PM
But that doesn't change the fact, my house is NOT a very good target.

All those cameras and an open steel door? Sounds ripe for the picking. You wouldn't have cameras and a steel door if you didn't have valuable stuff inside, right?

Double naught spy said "This statement says volumes and it says a lot of what many of us have to deal with. It says that the security of you and your loved ones isn't worth any extra expense, particularly if at the the end of a given period of time you don't get to keep it. You would rather keep your family less well protected than to leave an alarm for the property owner to have, and so you don't perceive an alarm system as being cost effective for your family."

Not sure what you mean, what do you have to deal with? I think it's moronic of you to assume that my family's safety is not worth the expense. Maybe it is but we just can't afford to install an alarm system. We are a one income household that has to live on a budget and an alarm system for a rent house is not a expense I can afford, nor is it an investment seeing we'll be out of the place in the next 6 months. Like many have stated before, we are looking for some secondary options (air horn, etc).

Sorry man, but you plainly stated why you would not install an alarm system that you think you and your family need to be better protected.

I rent a house so I'm not installing one.

So yeah, it comes across that you are willing to skimp on safety because it isn't your own property. Nothing in your post indicated anything about limited income.

Yankee Doodle
March 6, 2011, 08:31 PM
Powderman
It appears that you are well versed, and well trained. Way to go.
Which "Job" are you on, or are you just well read?
Just wanted to wish you a safe career. It IS a jungle out there.

sirsloop
March 6, 2011, 08:38 PM
The ol password is a good technique to not getting shot by the police. Lol... when you're pretty confident its actually the police you can put the gun down but don't put it down far enough away that you can't grab it again :D:D:D


Lol... homeowner has upstairs secured, armed with a MG42 machine gun, wearing WWII german foot soldier attire, named Haans. That would be somethin :eek::D

Stevie-Ray
March 6, 2011, 11:52 PM
some gems in here. telling 911 what you're wearing is a total gem.

OK. Think that's overboard?
Actually, I think Sonick was being genuine. I don't know anybody that would be silly enough to think that a bad idea and be sarcastic about it. His comment of his future mode of dress may have been made tongue-in-cheek, but even it is a good idea. Lime green would be easy to spot.

Davey
March 7, 2011, 12:09 AM
I rent a house so I'm not installing one.

There are wireless full featured systems. There are absolutely no wires. It's all radio signals from the sensors to the control panel or even multiple control panels. Motion sensors, alarm activated lighting, pretty much everything is possible via wireless. Probably worth looking into it.

I vouch for homesecuritystore.com. I've bought my hardwired system from them and I'll be buying the rest of the system from them as time goes on.

ripnbst
March 7, 2011, 12:31 AM
You want cheap alarms on doors? Hang bells from string off a door knob. It doesn't get any cheaper, and as a bonus you can take em to your next house! We do it for our small dogs to knock the bell to let us know when they need to go out. Free alarm is anytime you open and/or close the door you bang the hanging bell against the door and it makes enough noise to annoy the shat out of you after a few days.

Especially since you will train yourself to listen for it, cuz of the dogs. In the night if my dog goes over and hits it myself or my wife are awakened.

The potential downside is you get into the mentality of "That dang dog needs to go out." And you get up and just head for the door without paying attention to anything because you want to let the dog out and get back in bed quickly. You are essentially walking straight at the BG.

I combat this by luck that all our dogs sleep on the bed with us so if I hear the bell and notice all the dogs are on the bed, I grab my .45 and see whats shaking, sometimes our cats think they are toys. I'd like to shoot em anyway, not a cat person.

boogy886
March 7, 2011, 10:25 PM
Going on what Davey said, there are wireless alarms available. I work for Interlogix, formerly GE Security. You could get a trusted name brand (such as GE Security), high quality, wireless alarm for less than $500...most of us pay more than that for guns on a regular basis...cheap insurance as far as I'm concerned. Alarms aren't a fix-all, but we all know that. A signal gets sent to an alarm panel, the panel sends it to a monitoring station, someone at the monitoring station then dispatches police...not exactly instantaneous...but, better than nothin'.

I installed it in my home. There are other handy features such as being able to turn lights on and off, and adjust your thermostat via your smartphone. Pretty handy for cutting down energy costs when lights get left on and your thermostat isn't set properly.

PLUS, can you imagine the tactical advantage of being able to confuse the BG by turning the light on in the kitchen, and he spins around and now has his back to you as you come down the stairs?

threegun
March 8, 2011, 08:49 AM
The problem with bells and alarms is that they don't delay the entry from a sudden style home invasion. My burglary opened my eyes to the fact that with just a single kick someone could be standing in my home. Not enough time for me to get a gun.

So while I always recommend alarms and other warning devices I also now recommend things that delay an entry.

Slow the bad guy down so you can implement your emergency plan, secure the children, arm yourself, call police, or simply have time to wake up.

#1 Prevention (lighting and other which make your home less a target)
#2 Delay the ambush (burglar bars, door reinforcement devices etc.)
#2.5 Early warning (bells, dogs, alarms, etc.)
#3 Intel (alarm keypad {which lets you know point of entry}, perimeter camera system.)

The above combined with many of the tactics offered in the thread you are pretty much well covered.

Stevie-Ray
March 8, 2011, 06:09 PM
There are wireless full featured systems. There are absolutely no wires. It's all radio signals from the sensors to the control panel or even multiple control panels. Motion sensors, alarm activated lighting, pretty much everything is possible via wireless. Probably worth looking into it.
Yes, and I've been checking these out on the net. You can get quite a monitoring system for very little money, compared to just a few years ago. I'm pretty good now, where I live, but when I move, my new house is going to get a new system for far less than a grand. They're modular also, so you can always add components later.

Glenn Bartley
March 17, 2011, 08:23 PM
First, dial 911 and put the phone on the floor. You don't have to say a word. The call is automatically traced. They WILL come.
Then, keep up a loud commentary as to what is going on, so the Police dispatcher on the other end can advise the responding cars.
In a LOUD, CLEAR voice, announce that you are armed. You really want the cops to know this. If you leave your room, say so in a loud clear voice, and describe what you are wearing. You really want the cops to know this. Someone who is alone may want to do something like that described above but the eprson who started the thread said his wife would be with him. It would be very unadvisable for you to call 911 while also being on alert, holding your firearm and trying to be prepared to shoot if another person is there who can call 91 for you.

Deja vu
March 17, 2011, 11:07 PM
My neighbor said that before he moved here he lived in Nevada and had a home intruder in his home. He said that it took 15 min for the cops to arrive and that he only lived 10 min from town

BigBob3006
March 18, 2011, 01:51 AM
For bite a big dog is great. For alarm (bark) a small dog is better.:)

Thought I should add more info. Since we live in an era of mad lawyers, give the Police dispatcher limited info. My house was invaded by 2 men armed with pistols-rifles-wet noodles. one is down on my living room floor and is no threat-disarmed. the second man (give description) left limping with injured right leg headed west on Ferngully. My family is awake and in the house. Venture no other in formation on how the scumbag got the bad leg. Say nothing else until your lawyer gets there. You are not protecting yourself from the police, but from the bad guys lawyer when he tries to sue you. Sometimes a d.a. out to make a name for himself will attempt to get to higher office over the backs of anyone they can. Keep your mouth shut until your lawyer gets there!!! This is from a former Police Officer with 14 years on the job. Remember, your job of protecting your family isn't finished just because the shooting has stopped, and everything you say to the dispatcher is recorded.

dannyb
March 20, 2011, 09:00 AM
A lot of good information that I'm reading. I'd like to add a couple of other thoughts.

We have a small but yappy dog. He sleeps with us in our bedroom with the doors closed.

1) When he wakes me up (happens with some frequency) I grab the amplified shooter's muffs that I keep by my bed. I'm hard of hearing, and it's quicker to put on muffs than to mess with a hearing aid at 3 AM. Also useful if somebody shoots at me or I have to shoot at somebody - they'll be temporarily deaf and I won't.

2) Next, I grab a high intensity flashlight and firearm. Also wake my wife (sound sleeper) and make sure that she will be able to grab the shotgun in the closet.

3) open bedroom door and let the dog go tearing out howling into the house, follow with flash etc. and go to hallway, check top of front and back stairs. Stay visible to wife who should have retrieved shotgun. Do not try and clear house. I must admit, wife is not always ready with shotgun, but it's still nice to know that it can be retrieved if needed.

4) If dog is still howling with no other sounds, recall dog, pet him, compliment him, go back to bedroom with him. If, after a few minutes, he doesn't start up again, we can stand down.

5) If dog suddenly stops howling or yelps or I hear other sounds, retreat to bedroom, close bedroom door, take cover behind bed (with wife already there), call 911 and give descriptions of us and what we wear and all the other things that have been mentioned before.

Brian48
March 21, 2011, 12:05 PM
My dog is my early warning system. If she goes off, so will I. I think the notion of barricading oneself in the room with a cellphone is fine, but it only works for single individuals living alone. In my reality, I have my wife, my kids, and my elderly Mom in the house as well. Locking myself away in a safe room is not an option.

Daugherty16
March 21, 2011, 01:43 PM
I have twin turrent mounted .50-cal machine guns guarding the approach to both the front and back staircases. These are laser guided, infrared sensitive, gattling guns capable of burst fire at 6000 rounds per minute. After the last burst, i toss a couple of flash-bangs down the stairs, kill power to the 50's, and slide down the bannister blasing away with my AR-15s. On the main floor, the flashbangs go into each room 1-2-3-4. like that. Then i clear the house with my 12 gauge, one quick blast of 00 buck into each room, then its over.

Who needs to call the cops? Call the repairman.

Okay, so maybe i exaggerated a little...:D

Seriously , a German Shepard is about the most loyal, child-friendly, devoted pet you could ask for. They also put the fear of painful, bloody death into a BG mind when they start to bark and growl.

SeeBeeS
March 21, 2011, 06:48 PM
First if you think someone is breaking into your home you are not going to be sleepy or groggy, it's called adreneline.
Second the dog is a great deterent
Third for a newbe a double barreled shot gun or a Judge is in my opinion the best bet aim isn't a big issue and the shotgun load won't blow the door off it's hinges like in the movies.
Also remember the BG doesn't know your floor plan, you do, leave the lights off, don't give him anything
Finally most break in guys are cowards looking for an easy score. Fire one in his direction and he will probably break a leg trying to get back out the door.

Just my thoughts

Constantine
March 21, 2011, 08:17 PM
Finally most break in guys are cowards looking for an easy score. Fire one in his direction and he will probably break a leg trying to get back out the door.

Just my thoughts

I'm pretty positive there is a huge problem with discharging a firearm in that manner.

I'm just saying, I might be wrong but pretty sure that's the case.

sonick808
March 21, 2011, 11:02 PM
re: clothing information to 911 et al

oh I was totally being genuine. Thanks for backing me up on that. I consider that a gem because recently I had a situation where that would have greatly helped my interaction with the police. I was armed, and a break-in was in progress on my storage unit. I told them I had a gun, OK, but I never ever thought to tell them what I was wearing. So yeah, quite sincere about that :)

The lime green idea was true also! I have a very old, very comfy lime green commodore 64 shirt that would be perfect.

Moondew
March 22, 2011, 07:57 AM
Lots of great advice given, especially a good dog (I have two "yappers"), BG seem to prefer to avoid them for easier targets, wireless alarms offer lots of options now as secondary and can be configured to notify authorities.

Security cams can also easily be set up.

Flashlights and take to time to have you and the wife to get some firearms training. (Know your target and what is behind it)

Make sure you have the arms secure to prevent access by curious kids but access by you quickly when needed.

nefprotector
March 22, 2011, 12:07 PM
One thing Please keep your gun within your reach, loaded and at the ready 24/7.

I know people that own handguns that claim "Im well protected". "I have a gun in the safe , along with the ammo". Whats the use of an unloaded gun thats locked in a safe?

Mutatio Nomenis
March 22, 2011, 05:42 PM
It takes a while for cops to show up. Even if the police are fast, an invasive burglary can be done in 5 minutes easy and give the perps 10 min to get away. I wouldn't put my faith in Cops, Dogs, or a Taser.

There are a few demotes I'd like to post on this...

http://i606.photobucket.com/albums/tt146/mortablunt/Guns/M1911Demote38.jpg
http://i606.photobucket.com/albums/tt146/mortablunt/Guns/M1911Demote30.jpg
http://i606.photobucket.com/albums/tt146/mortablunt/Guns/M1911Demote18.jpg
http://i606.photobucket.com/albums/tt146/mortablunt/Guns/M1911Demote13.jpg
http://i606.photobucket.com/albums/tt146/mortablunt/Guns/M1911Demote10.jpg
http://i606.photobucket.com/albums/tt146/mortablunt/Guns/M1911Demote7.jpg

I haven't stumbled upon demotes for any other defensive guns, but let me know if you find 'em.